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Poetry Center Calendar: FALL 2014

SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
POETRY CENTER DIGITAL ARCHIVE



Unless otherwise noted:
All programs free to SFSU students and Poetry Center Members
Reduced low-income admission
No one turned away for lack of funds



PCDA logo-smallPOETRY CENTER DIGITAL ARCHIVE will be launching circa 100 rare archival recordings from the 1960s soon. Check out "50 from the '50s" —already posted 1950s recordings.

For updates LIKE us at facebook.


september 2014

Thursday SEPT 4 Celebrated AfroCuban poet Nancy Morejón
12:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free
Co-sponsored by The Poetry Center, and the Departments of
Creative Writing and Women and Gender Studies

Nancy Morejon

Nancy Morejón (b. 1944, Havana, Cuba) has been writing and publishing poetry for better than a half century, with her work achieving enormous popularity, and translated internationally into better than ten languages. Among her many honors are the Cuban Premio Nacional de Literatura (2001), the Gold Crown of Macedonia (2006), the Rafael Alberti Award (2007), the Gallega Universal Writer (2008) and, most recently, the prestigious Latin American Studies Association Award (2012). In 2013 she was awarded the Order of Arts and Letters of the French Republic. In 2008, Morejón was elected president of the Association of Writers of the Unión Nacional de Escritores y Artistas Cubanos (UNEAC). Currently, she directs the Caribbean Studies Center at Casa de las Américas, Havana, epicenter of Cuban and Latin American intelligentsia, and serves as Director of the Cuban Academy of Language.

Most of Nancy Morejón's extant poetry was collected into the anthology El huerto magnífico de todos, edited by Alfredo Pérez Alencart; this was preceded by Looking Within / Mirar adentro: Selected poems 1954-2000 (bilingual edition), edited and with an introduction by Juanamaría Cordones-Cook.

Her first collection of poetry to appear in the US, Where The Island Sleeps Like A Wing, was published in the Bay Area by the late Robert Chrisman's renowned Black Scholar Press in 1985, and translated by Kathleen Weaver. Her most recent poetry collections are Peñalver 51 (2009, Mockingbird Foundation of Zamora, Spain), and the anthology Exposed Havana (2012, Vigia de Matanzas Edition). Photo of Nancy Morejón by Tony Ryan.

Thursday SEPT 4 Words and Music, in memoriam Fred Ho
Royal Hartigan and Ben Barson
with special guest Hafez Modirzadeh

4:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free

Royal, Ben, Fred

Join us for one in a series of special events taking place in the Bay Area in tribute to the late musician and cultural worker Fred Ho (see Struggle For a New World! Fred Ho Memorial Tribute taking place September 7, details just below). Fred Ho was twice a featured guest at The Poetry Center, in performance with poets raúlrsalinas and Magdalena Gomez, and with the Brooklyn Sax Quartet — in that incarnation the members being Fred Ho, David Bindman, Rujesh Mahantappa, and Hafez Modirzadeh.

Royal Hartigan is a percussionist, pianist, and tap dancer who has studied and performed the musics of Asia, Africa, Europe, West Asia, and the Americas as well as African American blues, gospel, funk, hip-hop, and jazz traditions. He has performed, given workshops, and recorded internationally with his own blood drum spirit ensemble and master artists (blood drum spirit, 1997 and 2003, Innova; ancestors and blood drum spirit: the Royal Hartigan ensemble live in china, both Innova, 2008), Juba (Look on the Rainbow, 1987), Talking Drums (Talking Drums, 1985) and Someday Catch, Someday Down (1987), the Fred Ho Afro-Asian Music Ensemble, Hafez Modirzadeh's Paradox, the David Bindman-Tyrone Henderson Project, Nathaniel Mackey, Michael Heffley, soundSFound Orchestra, Global Phatness, and Paul Austerlitz, among others. He has released a documentary and artistic video of his work in West Africa and its relation to the African American music cultures (eve). More

Benjamin Barson is a composer, baritone saxophonist, and revolutionary political activist. He had been Fred Ho's Baritone saxophone protege from 2009 until Mr. Ho's passing in April of 2014, and partnered with Mr. Ho to produce several mixed media musical projects, most recently a tour of Ho's music through Vermont under the banner of Ecosocialism during Black History Month of 2014. Benjamin has played with the bands of a diverse cross-section of innovative voices in New York City's jazz scene, ranging from Arturo O'Farrill to Craig Harris. He has performed at New York's prestigious cultural institutions such as the Guggenheim Museum, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Lincoln Center. As a producer & curator, he was responsible for the launch and development of the music program at the iconic Red Rooster in Harlem. Ben does not separate culture from politics and considers cultural work to be essential to the construction of politics of liberation and sustainability in the 21st century. Currently he is working with the collective Scientific Soul Sessions and Ecosocialist Horizons, to construct a revolutionary self-sufficient gardening project in the city of Pittsburgh, where he resides. More




Sunday SEPT 7
STRUGGLE FOR A NEW WORLD!
Fred Ho Memorial Tribute

An all-star salute to the late musician and cultural worker
2:00–4:30pm @ Oakland Asian Cultural Center
388 9th Street (at Franklin), Oakland, free

co-sponsored by The Poetry Center and the Design Center for Global Needs at SFSU, Freedom Archives, and Oakland Asian Cultural Center

Fred Ho-early

“Fred Ho writes, speaks, and plays in order to persuade and inspire, to expose the crimes of the ruling class, and to challenge the status quo so that we imagine a different future.”
—Robin D. G. Kelley, historian and biographer of Thelonious Monk

On Sunday, September 7th an all-star assemblage of musicians, writers, and activists will gather in Oakland to honor Fred Ho — celebrated composer-bandleader, virtuoso baritone saxophonist, author of multiple books, and lifelong radical activist. A self-described “revolutionary matriarchal socialist” (New York Times), Fred Ho for four decades was a fierce warrior against exploitation and oppression wherever they persisted, including in his very public battle with cancer.

Fred Ho’s family will be present, and footage from the documentary Fred Ho’s Last Year (Stephen de Castro, 2014) will be screened.

Featured performers will include:

The Afro Asian Music Ensemble
Ben Barson
Davheed Behroozi
Jimmy Biala
Winston Byrd
Royal Hartigan
Mark Izu
Jon Jang
Masaru Koga
Genny Lim
Hafez Modirzadeh
Gwendolyn Mok
Ken Okada
John-Carlos Perea
Rova Saxophone Quartet
Akira Tana
Marty Wehner
Francis Wong
Brenda Wong Aoki

With speaker/emcees: Diane Fujino, Matef Harmachis,
and Tony Marks-Block.

Fred Ho biography (born Fred Wei-han Houn, August 10, 1957, Palo Alto, CA; died April 12, 2014, Brooklyn, NY). One of the outstanding composers of his generation, New York-based Chinese-American saxophonist and cultural activist Fred Ho founded the Afro-Asian Music Ensemble (1982), the Asian-American Art Ensemble (1981-88), and the Monkey Orchestra (1990), all of them fusing Western and Eastern instruments and influenced by Afro-American traditions, especially inspired by Charles Mingus’s orchestras. Later ensembles included The Green Monster Big Band, The Saxophone Liberation Front, and Brooklyn Sax Quartet (cofounded with David Bindman). Among many honors, he was the first Asian American musician to be awarded the Duke Ellington Distinguished Artist Lifetime Achievement Award. More

New York Times Obituary for Fred Ho, April 12, 2014

The Guardian (UK) obituary for Fred Ho

Fred Ho at Big Red Media, Inc.

Thursday SEPT 11 Andrew Joron and Julie Carr
4:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free

Andrew, Julie

Andrew Joron is the author of Trance Archive: New and Selected Poems (City Lights, 2010). Joron’s previous poetry collections include The Removes (Hard Press, 1999), Fathom (Black Square Editions, 2003), and The Sound Mirror (Flood Editions, 2008). The Cry at Zero, a selection of his prose poems and critical essays, was published by Counterpath Press in 2007. From the German, he has translated the Literary Essays of Marxist-Utopian philosopher Ernst Bloch (Stanford University Press, 1998) and The Perpetual Motion Machine by the proto-Dada fantasist Paul Scheerbart (Wakefield Press, 2011). As a musician, Joron plays the theremin in various experimental and free-jazz ensembles. Joron joins the creative writing faculty at SFSU this fall.

Julie Carr is the author of six books of poetry, most recently 100 Notes on Violence (Ahsahta), Sarah: Of Fragments and Lines (Coffee House), RAG (Omnidawn), and the forthcoming Think Tank (Solid Objects). She is also the author of Surface Tension—Ruptural Time: the Poetics of Desire in Late Victorian Poetry (Dalkey Archive). Her poems and essays and have been anthologized widely, including in Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. She is the co-editor of the forthcoming volume Active Romanticism: The Radical Impulse in Nineteenth-Century and Contemporary Poetic Practice. Her co-translations of Guillaume Apollinaire and of French poet Leslie Kaplan have been published in Denver Quarterly, Kenyon Review, and elsewhere, and a section of Kaplan’s Excess: The Factory was published as a chapbook by Commune Editions. She teaches at the University of Colorado in Boulder and helps to run Counterpath Press and Counterpath Gallery in Denver.


Thursday SEPT 25 Prose at The Poetry Center
Lance Olsen and Lucy Corin

4:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free

Lance, Lucy

Lance Olsen is author of more than 20 books of and about innovative writing, including three published this year: the novel based on Robert Smithson's earthwork the Spiral Jetty, Theories of Forgetting; How to Unfeel the Dead: New & Selected Fictions; and [[ there. ]], a trash-diary meditation on the confluence of travel, curiosity, and aesthetic/existential experimentation. His short stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in hundreds of journals and anthologies, such as Conjunctions, Black Warrior Review, Fiction International, Village Voice, BOMB, McSweeney’s and Best American Non-Required Reading. A Guggenheim, Berlin Prize, Artist-in-Berlin Residency, N.E.A. Fellowship, and Pushcart Prize recipient, as well as a Fulbright Scholar, he teaches experimental narrative theory and practice at the University of Utah and serves as chair of the Board of Directors at the independent press Fiction Collective Two, currently in its 40th year making fiction making trouble.

Lucy Corin is the author of the short story collections One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses (McSweeney's Books), and The Entire Predicament (Tin House Books) and the novel Everyday Psychokillers: A History for Girls (FC2). Stories have appeared in American Short Fiction, Conjunctions, Ploughshares, Tin House Magazine, and elsewhere. She spent 2012-13 at the American Academy in Rome as the John Guare Fellow in Literature.


october 2014


Thursday OCT 2 Poetry Center Book Award Reading
Stephen Ratcliffe
for Selected Days
4:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free

Stephen Ratcliffe

Selected DaysThe Poetry Center is pleased to announce that Stephen Ratcliffe’s book Selected Days (Counterpath Press, 2012) has been selected by an anonymous award judge to receive the annual Poetry Center Book Award.

The Poetry Center Book Award has been presented annually since 1980 by The Poetry Center, San Francisco State University, to a single outstanding book of poetry published in the previous year. The Poetry Center Book Award carries a cash prize and an invitation to read, along with the award judge, at The Poetry Center in San Francisco.

POETRY CENTER BOOK AWARD, 1980-2012

Anonymous judge’s statement on Selected Days:

• "Like a core sample drilled down through the days, these Selected Days come up with layered and differentiated strata in evidence of time perceived as phenomenally present on the poet/reader’s eye, ear, and persistent body moved to work, steadily and across an extensive sweep of one person’s human time. Stephen Ratcliffe’s dedicated (devotional) practice of writing a single roughly sonnet-dimensioned poem every day, and arranging them with little after-matter, trued to each day in its sequence, beginning in 1999, is apparently still ongoing, without let-up or lay-off, exactly this far into our now no longer new century. The schemata of this particular book, as “selected,” involves stepping into the span of some dozen years of consecutive days of the poet’s act of recording these peculiar (specific) calendric indexes, then casting briefer “new” works as sequences drawn out of the several greater books. So a “book of books,” slices out of a far more vast body of work, and yet discreet, intact. What was enormous now with new dimensions." More

Stephen Ratcliffe is a poet, professor, and publisher. His recent publications include: Painting (Chax, 2013), CLOUD / RIDGE (BlazeVox [books], 2011), Conversation (Bootstrap Press / Plein Air Editions, 2011), HUMAN / NATURE, Remarks on Color / Sound, Temporality (Eclipse, 2011); Reading the Unseen: (Offstage) Hamlet (Counterpath, 2010); REAL (Avenue B, 2007); CLOUD / RIDGE (ubu editions, 2007); HUMAN / NATURE (ubu editions, 2007); Portraits & Repetition (Post-Apollo, 2002); SOUND/(system) (Green Integer, 2002). He teaches at Mills College and lives in Bolinas, California, north of San Francisco on the Pacific coast.

Saturday OCT 11 Ed Roberson and Michael Palmer
7:00 pm @ Unitarian Center, 1187 Franklin St (at Geary),
San Francisco, $10*

(*$5 low income; free for SFSU students, Poetry Center members; Franklin St parking available at 7pm)

Ed, Michael

Ed Roberson is the author of eight books of poetry. He is the recipient of the Poetry Society of America’s Shelley Memorial Award and the Lila Wallace–Reader’s Digest Writers’ Award, and his prior books have won the Iowa Poetry Prize and the National Poetry Series. Having retired from Rutgers University, Roberson currently lives in Chicago where he has taught at Columbia College Chicago, Northwestern University, and the University of Chicago. For Fall 2014 he is appearing locally as the Holloway Lecturer at UC Berkeley.

2008 Citation for the Shelley Memorial Award

Michael Palmer has lived in San Francisco since 1969. His most recent collections are Active Boundaries (Selected Essays and Talks) (New Directions, 2008), Madman With Broom (selected poems, with Chinese translations by Yunte Huang, Oxford University Press, 2011) and Thread (New Directions 2011). His latest collaboration with the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company, Time's Bones, had its San Francisco premiere in April 2014. He has taught at various universities in the United States, Europe and Asia and published translations from a variety of languages, in particular French, Russian and Brazilian Portuguese. A new poetry collection, The Laughter of the Sphinx, is in preparation.

Wednesday OCT 15 "Here On The Edge": World War II Conscientious Objectors, Their Legacy of Art and Peace
Steve McQuiddy with special guest Vladimir Dupre
in conversation with Steve Dickison

7:00 pm @ City Lights Bookstore
261 Columbus (at Broadway), San Francisco, free


Co-sponsored by The Poetry Center, City Lights Bookstore,
and LitQuake

Waldport camp group

Here On The EdgeHere on the Edge (University of Oregon Press) is the story of how a World War II conscientious objectors camp on the Oregon Coast plowed the ground for the social and cultural revolutions of the 1960s. This evening explores a long-neglected element of World War II history: the role of pacifism and conscientious objection in what is often called "The Good War." It focuses on one camp situated on the rain-soaked Oregon coast, Civilian Public Service (CPS) Camp #56. As home to the Fine Arts Group at Waldport, the camp became a center of activity for artists and writers from across the country who chose to take a condition of penance (compulsive labor for refusing to serve in the military) and put it to constructive ends. After the war, camp members went on to participate in the San Francisco "Poetry Renaissance" of the 1950s.

Their focus was not so much on the current war, but on what kind of society might be possible when the shooting finally stopped. “Here on the edge,” they wrote, “we can only watch . . . and bide on the time when what we are, and that for which we have taken this stand, can be tangent again to the world.” More

Steve McQuiddy writes and lectures on Pacific Northwest history and culture, particularly the eccentric quarter. His monograph, The Fantastic Tale of Opal Whiteley, has been widely cited and reprinted, with an expanded version published in 2012. He has written for Salon, Mother Jones, Seattle Times, and Best Essays Northwest, and has been awarded by the Society of Professional Journalists. He is an honorary director of the Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission and currently teaches writing at Lane Community College in Eugene.

Vladimir Dupre, 93 years old, was the executive secretary of the Fine Arts at Waldport. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, and was a psychology professor at Grinnell College and the University of Kansas. He served as president of the National Training Laboratories in Washington, D.C., and ran a private psychotherapy practice. He divides his time between the east and west coasts.




Thursday OCT 16
Dawn Lundy Martin and Anne Lesley Selcer
3:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free

—AND—

Thursday OCT 16 Dawn Lundy Martin and Anne Lesley Selcer
reading and book party for
from A Book of Poems on Beauty
7:00 pm @ The Green Arcade
1680 Market Street (at Gough), San Francisco, free

Dawn Lundy Martin

Dawn Lundy Martin, an essayist and award-winning poet, is author of A Gathering of Matter / A Matter of Gathering (University of Georgia Press 2007), winner of the Cave Canem Prize; DISCIPLINE (Nightboat Books 2011), which was selected by Fanny Howe for the Nightboat Books Poetry Prize and a finalist for both Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the Lambda Literary Award; Candy, a limited edition letterpress chapbook (Albion Books 2011); The Main Cause of the Exodus (O’clock Press 2014); and The Morning Hour, selected by C.D. Wright for the 2003 Poetry Society of America’s National Chapbook Fellowship. Her forthcoming collection Life in a Box is a Pretty Life will be published by Nightboat Books in 2014. She has written a libretto for a video installation opera, titled "Good Stock on the Dimension Floor," which was scheduled to be featured in the 2014 Whitney Biennial, and is collaborating with architect Mitch McEwen on Detroit Opera House, “a project which stages an opera as a house, the house and its dramas of occupancy, vacancy, demolition, and re-purposing as an opera.” Martin is also a co-founder of the Black Took Collective, an experimental performance art/poetry group of three. She is Associate Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh.

Anne Lesley SelcerAnne Lesley Selcer recently served as a columnist for SFMoma's Open Space and has one book, Banlieusard, commissioned by Artspeak gallery. Writing had been anthologized in NW Edge III: the end of reality, The Physics of Context, The Feeling is Mutual: A list of our fucking demands, and most recently in It's night in San Francisco, but it's sunny in Oakland. A chapbook is forthcoming with supersuperette press, and another was published with the Dusie Kollektiv in 2011. Poems have appeared in The Clackamus Review, Dusie, Where Eagles Dare, in the artist book Aunt Maude's Scrapbook by Sydney Hermant, and are forthcoming in Fence. Writing on art has been commissioned by galleries Centre A, the Or, the Helen Pitt, and by artists Aurel Schmidt and Abass Ackhavan, and has appeared in Fillipand Doppelganger magazines. In San Francisco, she was a member of the now defunct Nonsite Collective. In Vancouver she created and curated an interdisciplinary series for poets, researchers, and artists called the Chroma Reading Series.

from A Book of Poems on Beauty was selected by Dawn Lundy Martin as the winner of the Gazing Grain Press 2014 feminist chapbook contest for poetry/hybrid manuscripts. The work is an ongoing, research based project which has produced poems, essays and video.



Thursday OCT 23 Cincinatti to San Francisco:
Catherine Wagner, Dana Ward, Tyrone Williams

7:00 pm @ Ruth's Table, 580 Capp Street (at 21st),
San Francisco, $10*

(*$5 low income; free for SFSU students, Poetry Center members; parking at Municipal Garage, 20th St btw Mission and Valencia)

Cathy, Dana, Tyrone

Three of the finest poets who presently share Cincinatti, Ohio as home are coming to San Francisco to read their work.

Catherine Wagner's collections of poetry include Nervous Device (City Lights, 2012), My New Job (Fence, 2009), Macular Hole (Fence, 2004), and Miss America (Fence, 2001). Her work has appeared in the Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Poetry, Gurlesque, Poets on Teaching, The Volta Book of Poets, Best American Erotic Poems and other anthologies, and her performances and songs are archived on PennSound. She is professor in the creative writing program at Miami University in Oxford, OH, where she lives with her son.

Dana Ward is the author of This Can't Be Life, The Crisis of Infinite Worlds, Some Other Deaths of Bas Jan Ader, as well as several other little books throughout the years. His new book, Smile, will be out from The Song Cave in 2015. He lives in Cincinnati, Ohio where hosts poetry readings most months, & co-edits Perfect Lovers Press with Paul Coors. He teaches at Bard College in the summertime too.

Tyrone Williams teaches literature and theory at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the author of five books of poetry, c.c. (Krupskaya Books, 2002), On Spec (Omnidawn Publishing, 2008), The Hero Project of the Century (The Backwaters Press, 2009), Adventures of Pi (Dos Madres Press, 2011) and Howell (Atelos Books, 2011). He is also the author of several chapbooks, including a prose eulogy, Pink Tie (Hooke Press, 2011). More

 


november 2014 — details tba

Thursday NOV 6 Kevin Killian and Andrew Durbin
4:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free

 

Thursday NOV 13 Donna de la Perrière and Barbara Tomash
4:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free

 



december 2014 — details tba


Thursday DEC 4 Amarnath Ravva and giovanni singleton
4:30 pm @ The Poetry Center HUM 512, SFSU, free

Saturday DEC 6 For Anne Boyer
7:00 pm @ Ruth's Table, 580 Capp Street (at 21st),
San Francisco, $10-$20 donation*

(*$5 low income; free for SFSU students, Poetry Center members; parking at Municipal Garage, 20th St btw Mission and Valencia)

 

Saturday DEC 13 George Oppen Memorial Lecture: Maria Damon
7:00 pm @ Ruth's Table, 580 Capp Street (at 21st),
San Francisco, $10*

(*$5 low income; free for SFSU students, Poetry Center members; parking at Municipal Garage, 20th St btw Mission and Valencia)

Supported by the Dorothy A. Fowler Trust

 



Unless otherwise noted:
All programs free to SFSU students and Poetry Center Members
Reduced low-income admission
No one turned away for lack of funds






PCDA logo-smallPOETRY CENTER DIGITAL ARCHIVE will be launching circa 100 rare archival recordings from the 1960s soon. Check out "50 from the '50s" online now.

For updates LIKE us at facebook.




Poetry Center programs are supported by San Francisco State University College of Liberal and Creative Arts, Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund (City of San Francisco), National Endowment for the Arts, SFSU Instructional Related Student Activities Fund, the Dorothy A. Fowler Trust, the Fund for Poetry, and Friends of the Poetry Center. BECOME A MEMBER




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