San Francisco State UniversityCampusMemo
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January 28

Volume 49, No. 17
announcements Vaughn's classic achievement Registrar forms Edelman mini-grants
Student researchers begin work In memorium: Tim Sampson Shining STAR CIC: looking for a few good students
This Week We want your blood Textiles of Cusco on exhibit Presidential Scholars director
Fostering int'l education Next Week Faculty affairs dean finalists Senate back in session
Taste diversity at Mocha Fest Begin planning for summer A spot on politics The currency market
A season for fungiphiles Work-study debate Enabling youth A taste for tea
All shook up The tragic effects Helpful oysters Teaching about terrorism
SFSU ranked a top school

Newsmakers: SFSU in the print and electronic news media

Announcements

Vaughn's classic achievement

Pamela Vaughn, associate professor of classics, recently received the highest teaching honor for a classics scholar in the United States.

She was presented with the 2001 Excellence in Teaching award from the American Philological Association (APA) at its 133rd annual meeting on Jan. 5 in Philadelphia.

"She has done everything that a dedicated and innovative teacher of the classics can do," said Jeffrey Tatum, a Florida State University classics professor who presented the award. "She has enriched our profession through her devotion to students at her university and to students in the schools."

Tatum later added: "Dr. Vaughn is not an easy 'A.' Her syllabus for Elementary Latin makes the point succinctly: 'I do not grade on the curve; there is no extra credit it is all about YOU and the LATIN!' Yet she is not unduly intimidating or off-putting. As one of her colleagues puts it, 'Her students learn very early on that they can be serious and hard working or they can leave. And yet they never leave.'"

Vaughn, who joined SFSU in 1993, is also chair of the Academic Senate.

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Registrar forms

Registrar's Office forms can be obtained by contacting Faye Sink at fayesink@sfsu.edu or via fax at ext. 8-6922. Many of them are also available at: Return to top

Edelman mini-grants

The Marian Wright Edelman Institute is accepting proposals for its Mini-Grant Program. The program provides assistance and materials for research, scholarship, creative activity, faculty collaboration and community advocacy focusing on children, youth and families.

Each grant will range from $3,000 to $10,000. A total of about $20,000 is available.

Probationary faculty, tenured faculty and lecturers are eligible. Faculty on early retirement (FERP) may not serve as principal investigators but are eligible to participate on project teams. Projects related to course development are ineligible. Projects must be conducted during summer or fall 2002.

For more information, contact the Edelman Institute at ext. 5-3564 or mweinst@sfsu.edu.

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Student researchers begin work

The deadline to apply for participation in the 16th Annual Student Research Competition is Tuesday, Feb. 26. Faculty are asked to share this news with their students.

All currently enrolled students and spring, summer and fall 2001 graduates are eligible. Proprietary research is excluded.

Students may enter the competition in one of the following areas: behavioral and social sciences; biological and agricultural sciences; business, economics and public administration; creative arts and design; education; engineering and computer science; health, nutrition and clinical sciences; humanities and letters; and physical and mathematical sciences.

The SFSU competition, which features oral presentations, takes place March 4-8.

SFSU will provide travel funds for campus winners to compete in the CSU-wide competition May 3-4 at CSU Long Beach.

Student registration forms and application guidelines are available in the Graduate Division office, ADM 254, and in college offices. For details, contact Darlene Yee at dyee@sfsu.edu or Lisa Hoskins at lhoskins@sfsu.edu.

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In memorium: Tim Sampson

Tim Sampson, a 30-year veteran who taught in the School of Social Work and a longtime faculty union leader, died of cancer Dec. 24, 2001. He was 66.

"I have lost a colleague, a friend and a mighty partner in the fight for justice," President Robert A. Corrigan said.

Perhaps best known on campus for his faculty union efforts, Sampson worked with the two immediate predecessors to the California Faculty Association (CFA). He helped organize the local chapter of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), and then served as an officer with the United Professors of California (UPC) when it was formed. He served as president of the SFSU chapter of the CFA for 13 years and went on to chair several statewide CFA committees. Off-campus, he was active as a union and community organizer.

"Tim was a warrior and a defender of faculty rights," said Pamela Vaughn, chair of the Academic Senate. "He will be sorely missed."

"Tim was so deeply committed to the mission of the CSU and to improving the lives of the people who are the CSU -- both those who work and those who study here," CFA President Susan Meisenhelder said. "Through his own work, he showed so many of the wonderful things possible when we join with others around a common goal."

A longtime supporter of the SFSU Labor Archives and Research Center, Sampson donated office files to the center from the AFT and UPC. His files included information and photographs of the San Francisco State College strike of the late 1960s, material that has been invaluable for SFSU students interested in that era.

Born in Chicago in 1935, Sampson received a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago in 1960 and a master's degree in social work from the University of Southern California in 1962.

He worked as a social worker and community organizer, including three years with the National Welfare Rights Organization, prior to joining SFSU's School of Social Work in 1970. He was awarded emeritus status in 2000.

Sampson brought his expertise in organizing and commitment to social change to the school.

"What made Tim unique as a social work educator was his involvement with his students. If there was a rally, a march or a demonstration, you could expect that Tim would be out there on the front lines along with his students in the fight for social justice," said Eileen Levy, director of the School of Social Work. "Tim was instrumental in developing nontraditional field placements for the social development students, where they could gain knowledge and experience in community organizing and social justice work."

Sampson also helped shape the school by mentoring faculty. Greta Glugoski, a former colleague, said he was "wise like Solomon" and always willing to answer faculty questions. "When Tim would advise you, it was the right advice," Glugoski said.

"Our school has been shaped by Tim's presence and his legacy will live on for generations to come," Levy said. "As Tim would say, 'Onward.'"

Sampson is survived by his wife Nancy and his children Peter and Joan.

A campus celebration of Tim Sampson's life and work will be held from 3:45 to 6 p.m., Monday, Feb. 4, in the Seven Hills Conference Center.

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CIC: looking for a few good students

The Community Involvement Center (CIC) asks faculty to inform their students of the center's academic internship opportunities.

The internships allow students to gain valuable experience in an office setting or the community, where their presence is greatly needed.

The recruiting period runs through Feb. 15. For details, visit the CIC in building T-A (near the SFSU Bookstore), call ext. 8-1486 or send an e-mail to: cic@thecity.sfsu.edu.

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Shining STAR

Claudette Neveu, university bursar in the Cashier's Office, is STAR of the month for January.

Neveu handles a variety of functions for the Bursar's Office, including tuition, fees and financial assistance for students. She also oversees two offices to assure the entire campus receives prompt, courteous assistance from the Bursar's Office.

"I have had the pleasure of being Claudette's supervisor for six years. Over this period she has demonstrated great efficiency, reliability and professionalism," said Cora Wong, director of student financial operation and business systems.

Biology Professor Leigh Auleb turned to Neveu to help solve a problem with his parking permit.

"She is efficient and conveyed the impression that she really wanted to resolve my difficulty. She is cheerful and has a wonderful sense of humor," Auleb said. "I left the Administration building with a great feeling of satisfaction, but more than that, I had a smile on my face."

The STAR Committee invites you to congratulate Claudette Neveu.

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CIC: looking for a few good students

The Community Involvement Center (CIC) asks faculty to inform their students of the center's academic internship opportunities.

The internships allow students to gain valuable experience in an office setting or the community, where their presence is greatly needed.

The recruiting period runs through Feb. 15. For details, visit the CIC in building T-A (near the SFSU Bookstore), call ext. 8-1486 or send an e-mail to: cic@thecity.sfsu.edu.

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This Week

We want your blood

The Student Health Service (SHS) will hold a blood drive from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday in the SHS Conference Room. Faculty, staff and students interested in donating blood must sign up in advance.

The signup sheet is located in SHS, Area D, Room 72. For details, contact Kamal Harb at harbk@sfsu.edu.

Blood Centers of the Pacific is sponsoring the drive.

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Textiles of Cusco on exhibit

The campus community is invited to a reception with David Van Buskirk of the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday in the University Club.

Buskirk's extraordinary photographs and weavings on display in the University Club are striking representations of Peruvian culture. Refreshments will be served.

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Presidential Scholars director

The deadline to apply for faculty director of the Presidential Scholars Program is Thursday. Applicants must send a letter and curriculum vitae to Gail Whitaker, associate vice president for academic program development, in ADM 447.

The position begins this fall.

For details, visit: www.sfsu.edu/~scholars.

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Fostering int'l education

The deadline for grant proposals to foster international education is Friday. The Office of International Programs is offering the grants. Tenured and tenure-track faculty who are not on early retirement (FERP) are eligible to apply.

Applications are available in ADM 450 or on the OIP Web site: www.sfsu.edu/~oip. For details, call ext. 8-1293.

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Next Week

Faculty affairs dean finalists

Five finalists have been selected for dean of faculty affairs and professional development. They have been invited to meet with SFSU representatives. The campus community is invited to the presentations and receptions for each candidate in the University Club.

Senate back in session

The first Academic Senate meeting of the semester will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, at Seven Hills Conference Center.

The Academic Senate and its Shared Governance Task Force invite the campus community to attend and discuss issues and concerns of shared governance. Topics of discussion include the role of shared governance in the retention-tenure-promotion process and in allocating academic resources.

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Taste diversity at Mocha Fest

The Mocha Festival, to be held Feb. 5-14, features four concerts celebrating folk, country, bluegrass/Celtic/African and Delta blues music and an afternoon of Southern humor.

Odetta performs Tuesday, Feb. 5. Jim Lauderdale performs Wednesday, Feb. 6. Peter Rowan performs Thursday, Feb. 7. James Cottom performs Tuesday, Feb. 12. T. Bubba Bechtol with Red Meat perform Thursday, Feb. 14.

All shows are at 7:30 p.m. in Knuth Hall, except T. Bubba Bechtol with Red Meat, which is at 3:30 p.m. in Jack Adams Hall.

Tickets are $15 general admission and $8 for students and seniors for each show. Tickets may be purchased at the Creative Arts Box Office or by calling ext. 8-2467.

The festival is presented by Associated Students Performing Arts and Lectures and co-sponsored by Jazz and World Music Studies.

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Begin planning for summer

A Summer Semester Committee meeting will be held from 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, in ADM 552. All meetings are held from 10 to 11 a.m. the first Thursday of the month in ADM 552, except for the April 4 meeting, which will be in ADM 460.

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A spot on politics

Gerard Heather, professor of political science, commented on California's 2002 gubernatorial campaign in a Jan. 17 interview with KPIX-TV, Channel 5. "I think that he comes across as immediate, friendly, benign and serious," he said of Republican challenger Richard Riordan, the former mayor of Los Angeles.

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The currency market

The Jan. 7 edition of KQED-FM's Forum included Charles Haase, assistant professor of economics, in a discussion on the history and future of worldwide currencies following the adoption of the euro. "We have the technology now to move toward a virtually cash-free society. We won't, however, because there still exists a demand for hard currency for anonymous transactions, or for transactions that you know are complete as of that moment," he said. "As long as that demand exists, we're going to have a hard currency whether the government says so or not."

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A season for fungiphiles

The wide variety of mushrooms in the Bay Area during the fertile harvest season was the focus of a Dec. 25 New York Times story. Among their many uses, including medicinal and hallucinatory ones, mushrooms have flourished in traditional Asian and Italian cuisines and have gained increasing popularity, according to the article. Dennis Desjardin, professor of biology, however, noted that the change in societal attitudes toward mushrooms is a recent phenomenon. He said, "North Americans have been fungiphobic, as opposed to Europeans, who are fungiphilic."

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Work-study debate

Students receiving financial aid through work-study programs at their university or college are generally not involved with community service programs, especially at Ivy League schools, according to the January/February edition of the Washington Monthly. Government aid provides 75 percent of student wages for financial aid recipients, yet some schools are spending as little as 5 percent of federally allocated money on wages for community service positions. "Presidents at many prominent institutions take an adamant position that work-study is strictly financial aid and reject government telling them how to spend it, regardless of what they do," said President Robert A. Corrigan, who also noted that elite private schools in the East garner a disproportionate share of federal work-study funding. "The further West you go, the less well-funded are the work-study programs," he explained.

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Work-study debate

Students receiving financial aid through work-study programs at their university or college are generally not involved with community service programs, especially at Ivy League schools, according to the January/February edition of the Washington Monthly. Government aid provides 75 percent of student wages for financial aid recipients, yet some schools are spending as little as 5 percent of federally allocated money on wages for community service positions. "Presidents at many prominent institutions take an adamant position that work-study is strictly financial aid and reject government telling them how to spend it, regardless of what they do," said President Robert A. Corrigan, who also noted that elite private schools in the East garner a disproportionate share of federal work-study funding. "The further West you go, the less well-funded are the work-study programs," he explained.

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Enabling youth

The Dec. 6 edition of the Marin Independent Journal spotlighted Alison Stewart, program director of SFSU's Operation Access (part of the Recreation and Leisure Studies Department), who was honored for her work with youth with disabilities by the Bay Area group Support for Families of Children with Disabilities. "I'm doing a job that I love and it's nice to be recognized, and to be doing a job that I feel so strongly about," Stewart said. "What is most important to me was that I was nominated by the parents of the children that I serve. The award validates my work and makes me realize that working with families and individuals is the most important part of what I'm trying to accomplish."

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A taste for tea

A formal Japanese tea ceremony, one of many activities celebrating International Education Week on campus, was featured in the Nichi Bei Times on Dec. 12. The occasion, held in a small tea room -- a replica of a Japanese peasant's house in ancient times -- inside the Humanities Building included faculty members and students. Midori Mckeon, chair of the Foreign Languages and Literatures Department, who took part in the event, said, "Introducing different cultures is a contribution to a world peace. Although in a modest way, I hope the tea ceremony promotes cultural exchange and understanding."Thomas La Belle, provost/vice president of academic affairs, added, "It was pretty cool. They put together a very striking laboratory ... for the study of Japanese culture. I liked the structure of the formality and the heavy cultural influence."

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All shook up

The recent discovery of the first fault line running beneath San Francisco by John Caskey, associate professor of geology, and Drew Kennedy, graduate student, was featured in a Dec. 15 San Francisco Chronicle article. Details about the Serra Thrust Fault were presented at the recent American Geophysical Union meeting. Asked if it's possible to predict whether this fault line, dormant for 2,500 years, may again come alive, Caskey said, "That's the big question. We feel we have demonstrated that it's active. It's highly debatable whether the active deformation is associated with large earthquake movement." The discovery was also featured in the Los Angeles Times on Dec. 16.

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The tragic effects

Time published a cover story on Nov. 19 looking at the traumatic after effects of the Sept. 11 tragedy on the lives of Americans, including students within the classroom. Sophie Clavier, lecturer of criminal justice and international relations, was quoted in the magazine, referring to her class as a "group therapy session." She added, "Students have been openly insecure, asking the same questions I'm getting from my 11- and 8-year-old kids at home. They want to know if they'll be O.K. And they come to my office hours in tears."

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Helpful oysters

"It's what we call a keystone species, with a number of functions important to the ecosystem," said Michael McGowan, senior research scientist of the Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, referring to the Olympia oyster in a front page story in the Nov. 26 issue of the Marin Independent Journal. The tiny oyster, once found in abundance in the San Francisco Bay, is now the subject of research aimed at reintroducing the mollusk into its native region. "They (oysters) would be here to filter out and kill non-native species that are coming in ballast waters. The fish communities would be benefited by cleaner water," McGowan observed.

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Teaching about terrorism

Universities across the country are adding new courses relating to events surrounding the Sept. 11 attacks, according to a Jan. 2 article in the San Jose Mercury News. "No faculty member could look at what happened and not have a deep sense of concern for young people," said Joe Tuman, professor of speech and communication studies. David Fischer, SFSU's diplomat in residence in the international relations department, looked at past experience with international incidents and expressed his worry that the recent interest in topics relating to the attacks may be short-lived. But as Rebecca Nagy, an international relations major, pointed out, "There definitely will be people looking at the new classes."

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SFSU ranked a top school

SFSU was named as one of the top 100 higher learning institutions for Hispanic students in the Nov. 19 edition of the Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education. Institutions were selected according to their ability to attract Hispanic students and offer them outstanding opportunities. SFSU founded its Raza Studies Department in 1969 and is the only university in the United States to offer a master's degree in ethnic studies, accepting about 15 students a year. The University also houses the Cesar E. Chavez Institute for Public Policy, and many students volunteer in the Bay Area's Hispanic community as part of their coursework. About 14 percent of the University's undergraduate student body and nearly 6 percent of its faculty are of Hispanic origin.

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