Bulletin--Science Program

Science


College of Science and Engineering
Dean: James C. Kelley

Center for Interdisciplinary Science
TH 323
415-338-1571
Director: Susann Novalis

Programs
B.A. in Science: Concentration in Individual Major

B.A. in Science: Concentration in Physical Science

M.A. in Science


Program Scope
The Center for Interdisciplinary Science (CIS) is a part of the College of Science and Engineering which especially encourages inquiries that extend across disciplines, not only within the sciences but also in other areas as they interface with the sciences. The bachelor's degree is based on gaining the breadth of science and scientific methodology through "Basic Courses," and gaining depth in a defined interdisciplinary area through a "Thematic Concentration." The basic courses include mathematics (six units), physics (eight units), chemistry (eight to ten units), biology (five units), earth sciences (three to four units), and history of science (two to three units). The specific basic courses vary slightly depending on the type of thematic concentration that the student takes.

A student may take one of three thematic concentrations:

Individual Major. The student in consultation with an adviser designs and proposes an interdisciplinary science theme. A written statement must be developed which describes the goals of the proposed major. The Individual Major consists of courses planned in advance to focus on this coherent theme.

Physical Sciences. Suitable for students who wish to obtain a teaching credential in the physical science area under the Single Subject Waiver Program; see Credential Programs for further information on credential requirements. Within this thematic concentration, three areas of emphasis are possible; namely, chemistry, physics, and earth sciences.

Meteorology. Students interested in this program should consult the Department of Geosciences, TH 509, 338-2061 or see "Bachelor of Arts in Science: Concentration in Meteorology."

Career Outlook
Career opportunities are primarily those in which a broad scientific background is desirable, such as work related to environmental concerns, health, safety, physical hazards, technical writing, science education, and technical administration.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SCIENCE: CONCENTRATION IN INDIVIDUAL MAJOR

All major course work must be completed with letter grades (CR/NC grades are not acceptable). Courses are listed under the Center for Interdisciplinary Science. Other courses required in this major are listed in alphabetical sequence (see course discipline listing in the Announcement of Courses section).

Basic Courses					Units
Mathematics					    6
MATH 220	Calculus & Analytic Geometry I
One of the following:
	MATH 221	Calculus and Analytic 
			Geometry II
	CSC 210		Introduction to Computer 
			Programming: PASCAL
Physics						    8
PHYS 111/112	General Physics I and Labora-
		tory (3-1) and
	PHYS 121/122	General Physics II and 
			Laboratory (3-1) or
PHYS 220/222	General Physics w/Calculus I & 
		Laboratory (3-1) and
	PHYS 230/232	General Physics w/Calcu-
			lus II & Laboratory (3-1)
Chemistry					 8-10
CHEM 111	General Chemistry I (5)
One of the following:
	CHEM 113/114	General Chemistry II & 
			Laboratory (3-2)
	CHEM 130	General Organic 
			Chemistry
Biology						    5
BIOL 230	Introductory Biology I (5)
Earth Sciences—one of the following:		  3-4
GEOL 102	Introduction to Oceanography
GEOL 110	Physical Geology (4)
ASTR 320	The Solar System and
ASTR 321	Observational Astronomy 
		Laboratory (1)
ASTR 330	Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology
METR 401	Introduction to Physical 
		Meteorology (4)
History—one of the following:			    3
ASTR 350	History of Astronomy
BIOL 321	Magic, Myths, and Medicine—A 
		History of Medicine
NEXA 387	Origins of Modern Science
NEXA 388	Newtonian Revolution
NEXA 389	Darwinian Revolution
NEXA 390	Einsteinian Revolution
CHEM 599	Chemistry, Its Evolution Through 
		the Centuries
MATH 300	History of Mathematics
PHYS 500	Physics: Its Evolution Through 
		the Ages
		Total basic courses		33-36
Electives					   21
Academic courses selected by the student in 
consultation with a faculty adviser in the 
College of Science and Engineering centering on 
an interdisciplinary science theme. The 
elective program must be designed, proposed, 
and approved by the adviser and the director of 
the Center for Interdisciplinary Science before 
the senior year or before completion of 90 units 
of credit. At least fifteen elective units must 
be in upper division courses.
		Total units for program		54-57

BACHELOR OF ARTS: CONCENTRATION IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE

All major course work must be completed with letter grades (CR/NC grades are not acceptable). Courses are listed under the Center for Interdisciplinary Science. Other courses required in this major are listed in alphabetical sequence (see course discipline listing in the Announcement of Courses section).

This thematic concentration with emphasis in any one of the three areas listed below will fulfill the "Single Subject Waiver Program in Physical Sciences" for the single subject teaching credential. For further requirements, see "Credential Programs."

NOTE: students taking a thematic concentration in physical science must take: CHEM 113-114, GEOL 110, ASTR 320-321 or METR 401, and NEXA 388 or NEXA 390. Chemistry Emphasis students only may take CHEM 599 in place of NEXA 388 or NEXA 390. Total basic course units in this case will be 40.

Basic Courses					Units
Mathematics					    6
MATH 220	Calculus & Analytic Geometry I
One of the following:
	MATH 221	Calculus and Analytic 
			Geometry II
	CSC 210		Introduction to Computer 
			Programming: PASCAL
Physics						    8
PHYS 111/112	General Physics I and 
		Laboratory (3-1) and
	PHYS 121/122	General Physics II and 
			Laboratory (3-1) or
PHYS 220/222	General Physics w/Calculus I and 
			Laboratory (3-1) and
	PHYS 230/232	General Physics w/Calcu-
			lus II & Laboratory (3-1)
Chemistry					   10
CHEM 111	General Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 113/114	General Chemistry II and 
		Laboratory (3-2)
Biology						    5
BIOL 230	Introductory Biology I (5)
Earth Sciences					    8
GEOL 110	Physical Geology (4)
ASTR 320	The Solar System and
	ASTR 321	Observational Astronomy 
			Laboratory (1) or
	METR 401	Introduction to Physical 
			Meteorology (4)
History—one of the following:			    3
NEXA 388	Newtonian Revolution
NEXA 390	Einsteinian Revolution
CHEM 599	Chemistry, Its Evolution Through 
		the Centuries (optional course 
		for Chemistry Emphasis only)
		Total basic courses		   40

CHEMISTRY EMPHASIS
CHEM 300	General Physical Chemistry I	    2
CHEM 301	General Physical Chemistry II	    2
CHEM 320	Modern Methods of Quantitative 
		Chemical Analysis		    4
CHEM 333	Organic Chemistry I		    3
CHEM 334	Organic Chemistry I Lab. (2) or
	CHEM 335	 Organic Chemistry II	  2-3
Upper division electives in Chemistry		    2
		Emphasis total			15-16
		Total units for program		55-56

PHYSICS EMPHASIS
PHYS 320/321	Modern Physics & Lab. (3-1)	    4
PHYS 340	Modern Optics			    3
One of the following:				  3-4
	PHYS 357	Principles of 
			Electronics (4)
	PHYS 370	Thermodynamics and 
			Statistical Mechanics
	PHYS 355	Introduction to Digital 
			Electronics
Upper division electives in Physics		  5-6
		Emphasis total			15-17
		Total units for program		55-57

EARTH SCIENCES EMPHASIS
GEOL 420	Mineralogy			    4
GEOL 440	Paleontology (4) or
	GEOL 450	Geomorphology (4)	    4
Upper division Astronomy with Laboratory	  3-4
Upper division electives in earth sciences 
(Astronomy, Geology, or Meteorology)		  3-4
		Emphasis total			14-16
		Total units for program		54-56

MASTER OF ARTS IN SCIENCE

The Master of Arts in Science is intended for students who are not going into the traditional science disciplines but rather are interested in synthesis and holistic inquiries that extend across disciplines not only within the natural sciences but also to other disciplines such as social, behavioral and humanistic areas as they interface with the natural sciences. The program is recommended for students who: (1) plan to terminate their studies at the M.A. level and seek employment in areas for which they are qualified; (2) are interested in science teaching at the secondary and junior college levels; and (3) wish to further their understanding of interdisciplinary science areas. The program is generally not suitable for students who wish to continue on for advanced studies in traditional science disciplines.

This program is currently under revision and is not admitting students for the 1994-96 academic years. Interested students should contact the director regarding the status of the program.


Bulletin 1994-96 Table of Contents, SFSU Home Page

last modified July 26, 1995


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