Bulletin--Liberal Studies Program-1

Liberal Studies


Undergraduate Studies
Dean: Erwin Seibel

Advising Center
ADM 212
415-338-2101
Assistant to the Dean: Helen Goldsmith

Area I Coordinator—Susan Shimanoff
Advisers—Folb, Johnson, Shimanoff, Sommers, Stec, Swanson, Terris

Area II Coordinator—Leigh Auleb
Advisers—Auleb, Bruno, Gutierrez, Tabatabaian

Area III Coordinator—Susan Taylor
Advisers—Busacca, Collier, Flynne, Kroeker, Loewy, Miller

Area IV Creative Arts Coordinator—Jim Davis
Advisers—Davis, Marshall

Area IV Humanities and Foreign Languages Coordinator—Ruth Knier
Advisers—Knier, Steier, Martin (Foreign Languages)

NEXA Coordinator—David Meredith

Advisers for students with no emphasis—Chuck, Goldsmith, Smith

Programs
B.A. in Liberal Studies

B.A. in Liberal Studies: Concentration in NEXA


Program Scope
The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies requires 124 units for graduation. The 46-unit Liberal Studies major has a multidisciplinary curriculum encompassing all areas of knowledge in the arts and sciences. Students seeking a broad liberal arts background with considerable flexibility in course selection should consider this major. Many employers and professional schools prefer graduates with the type of richly diversified education that this major provides.

Before meeting with an individual adviser, Liberal Studies majors must attend a Liberal Studies workshop on Advising Day or at the Advising Center where workshops are offered on a regular basis. At the workshop, students are introduced to the requirements and receive information and materials about the program and advising. Liberal Studies majors with a touch tone phone may call 338-1510 for a recording containing up-to-date information about advising and special events of interest to Liberal Studies majors.

NEXA offers a concentration within the Liberal Studies major which allows students to pursue the NEXA theme, a convergence of conceptually different disciplines upon a core of common concern that cuts across all disciplines, in depth and with a specific focus.

Facilities
This program is pursued in all areas of the university; facilities used vary according to the individual student's program.

Career Outlook
The Liberal Studies major is applicable to a variety of fields. It is the main avenue of preparation for those desiring to become elementary school teachers; the program's broad interdisciplinary approach provides the broad academic background necessary for teaching in a self-contained classroom. Since the major has considerable flexiblity, it can be designed to meet a student's personal and academic interests. It can be planned with a particular career in mind, such as in government agencies, in multicultural communities, and in public service. It is appropriate also as preparation for various professions and graduate programs such as business, counseling, law, librarianship, medicine, and social work.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LIBERAL STUDIES

Courses for this program are listed in alphabetical sequence (see course listing in the Announcement of Courses section).

As soon as possible after declaring the major, each student must consult with an adviser in the student's chosen area of emphasis to discuss the Liberal Studies major, Liberal Studies program (credential candidates), the selection of courses, the preparation of the planning worksheet, and the academic statement. This statement must explain:

Each student's planning worksheet and academic statement must be approved by the area adviser and the area-of-emphasis coordinator before the student has completed 110 units and no later than the semester prior to the semester the student plans to graduate. These approved documents must be on file in the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies before the graduation application will be signed.

The 85-unit Liberal Studies Program is designed for those students seeking the Multiple Subject Credential. The 46-unit major is a component of the Liberal Studies Program. The other 39 units are in courses which fulfill specific subject matter requirements and some electives. Courses in this component of the Liberal Studies Program are listed under Additional Subject Matter Requirements in the Multiple Subject Credential Waiver Program at the end of the course listings for the major.

Additional informational materials on the major and the program are available from the Advising Center, Liberal Studies area advisers and coordinators, and the Office of Undergraduate Studies.

Outline of Curriculum

Units in Core. All units must be upper division.

AREA I—Communication, Language, and Literature
		Literature			  3
		Speech				  4
AREA II—Life Science, Physical Science, and 
	Mathematics
		Life Sci.			  3
		Phys. Sci.			  3
AREA III—Behavioral and Social Sciences
		SS 300				  3
		SS 301				  3
AREA IV--Creative Arts, Humanities, and Foreign 
	Languages
		CHS/HUM 425			  3
		IAC 426				  3
	Total for core				 25
Units in Area of Emphasis. A minimum of six units must be upper division. One area is chosen.

AREA I—Communication, Language, and 
	Literature				12-unit Pattern or
AREA II—Life Science, Physical Science, and 
	Mathematics				12-unit Pattern or
AREA III—Behavioral and Social Sciences		12-unit Pattern or
AREA IV—Creative Arts, Humanities, and Foreign 
	Languages				12-unit Pattern
	Total for area of emphasis		12
Units on Advisement. May be lower or upper division courses. Three units must be taken in each area other than the area of emphasis.

AREA I—Communication, Language, and 
	Literature				0-3
AREA II—Life Science, Physical Science, and 
	Mathematics				0-3
AREA III—Behavioral and Social Sciences		0-3
AREA IV—Creative Arts, Humanities, and Foreign 
	Languages				0-3
	Total for electives			  9

TOTAL						 46
(Minimum 31 upper division units)

COURSES INCLUDED IN THE LIBERAL STUDIES MAJOR

All courses included in the Liberal Studies major must be selected in consultation with an academic adviser in the student's chosen area of emphasis. All courses must meet the criteria for internal coherence and integrative interrelationships articulated in the student's academic statement.

Descriptions of all courses as well as any prerequisites and corequisites to courses are in this Bulletin. All prerequisites and corequisites must be met for all courses taken at San Francisco State University.

With adviser and area coordinator approval, courses transferred from other institutions may be used in the core category of the major if they are upper division and equivalent in content to those courses listed in this Bulletin as meeting the core requirements. Lower and/or upper division courses transferred from other institutions may be used in the area of emphasis so long as a minimum of six units in the area of emphasis are upper division and the content of the courses is equivalent to those listed in the Bulletin as meeting the requirements of the chosen area of emphasis. Lower and/or upper division courses transferred from other institutions may be used in the units on advisement category. All residence requirements as stipulated in the Bulletin must be met.

Courses used to meet General Education Basic Subjects (Segment I) requirements may not be used in any category of the Liberal Studies major. A maximum of twelve units used to meet General Education requirements in Segment II and/or Segment III may be included as courses in the core, area of emphasis, or units on advisement categories.

A course may be used for only one purpose within the major. For example, if a course is used in the core, it may not be used in the area of emphasis or in the units on advisement.

REQUIRED CORE COURSES

AREA I--COMMUNICATION, LANGUAGE, AND LITERATURE

Literature--Select one:
AAS 322		Chinese American Culture—Language and Literature
AAS 363		Survey of Philippine Literature
BLS 411		African—African–American Literature
BLS 420		Black Fiction
ENG 480		Junior Seminar
ENG 554		Modern American Novel
ENG 555		The Short Story
ENG 583		Shakespeare: Representative Plays
ENG 584		Shakespeare: Selected Plays
LARA 560	Contemporary Literature of La Raza
NEXA 350	Explorations of the Future
NEXA 390	The Einsteinian Revolution
NEXA 398	John Steinbeck and "Doc" Ricketts: 
		Literature of the Sea
WOMS 540/ENG 614 Contemporary Women's Novel 
		[topic course–no other topics acceptable]
WOMS 541/ENG 614 Women Writers and Social Change 
		[topic course–no other topics acceptable]
and

Speech—Select one:
SPCH 351	Public Speaking (4)
SPCH 362	Introduction to Oral Interpretation (4)
SPCH 363	Oral Interpretation of the First Person 
		Voice (4)
SPCH 365	Argumentation and Debate (4)
SPCH 366	Persuasion (4)
SPCH 521	Group Discussion (4)
AREA II—LIFE SCIENCE, PHYSICAL SCIENCE, AND MATHEMATICS

Upon adviser and department approval, students emphasizing Area II may substitute more advanced upper division courses normally taken by majors in these fields.

Life Science—Select one:
BIOL 300	Nature Study
BIOL 313	Principles of Ecology
BIOL 318	Our Endangered Planet
BIOL 321	Magic, Myth, and Medicine
BIOL 326	Disease!
BIOL 333	The Genetic Revolution
BIOL 335	Origin of Life
Physical Science—Select one:
ASTR 350	History of Astronomy
CHEM 599	Chemistry, Its Evolution Through the 
		Centuries
GEOL 302	The Violent Earth
METR 302	The Violent Atmosphere and Ocean
PHYS 500	Physics, Its Evolution Through the 
		Centuries
AREA III—BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

SS 300	Social Sciences Core I and
SS 301	Social Sciences Core II
AREA IV—CREATIVE ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES

CHS/HUM 425	Thought and Image I and
IAC 426		Thought and Image II

AREA OF EMPHASIS BEYOND THE CORE

Liberal Studies majors must emphasize one of the four areas in which they take an additional twelve units beyond the core. A minimum of six units in the chosen area of emphasis must be upper division.

AREA I—COMMUNICATION, LANGUAGE, AND LITERATURE (Area of Emphasis)

Students who select Area I as the area of emphasis must take ENG 480, Junior Seminar, either as a course in the Area I core category, Literature, or as one of the courses in Category A, Literature, in the twelve-unit emphasis.

At least one course must be from Category A, Literature, and at least one course must be from one other category; i.e., Category B, Communication Strategies; Category C, Language/Speech Performance; or Category D, Language/Speech Studies. The other two courses (for a minimum of twelve units) may be taken from any category in Area I.

Category A—Literature
Course(s) may be selected from among those listed under Required Core Courses Area I Literature or from among those listed below.

AAS 206		Introduction to Asian American Literature
AIS 162		American Indian Oral Literature
AIS 360		Modern American Indian Authors
BLS 210		Introduction to Black Literature
CLAS 330	Myth in Ancient Epic
CLAS 360	Greek and Roman Mythology
ENG 150		The Study of Literature
ENG 151		The Short Poem in English (CAN ENGL 20)
ENG 152		The Novel in English
ENG 153		The Drama in English
ENG 154		Masterworks of Literature in English
ENG 155		Contemporary Literature
ENG 158		American Literature
ENG 159		Beginning Shakespeare
ENG 502 through 586 Period, Genre, Individual Authors
ENG 614		Women in Literature: Authors and Characters 
		[all topics acceptable]
ENG 616		Science Fiction and Fantasy
ENG 618		Studies in Gay and Bisexual Literature 
		[all topics acceptable]
ENG 630		The Visionary Child in Literature 
		[topic course–no other topics acceptable]
ENG 631		English Literature from Third World 
		Countries
ENG 635		Coming of Age in America
ENG 655		Studies in Literature for Adolescents
LARA 230	Introduction to Contemporary Raza 
		Literature
NEXA 386	The Freudian Revolution
WOMS 551	Lesbian Literature
WCL 230		Introduction to World Literature
WCL 250		Fables and Tales
WCL 260		Myths of the World
WCL 415		The Literary Use of Legend 
		[all topics acceptable]
WCL 420		Studies in Comparative Literature 
		[all topics acceptable]
WCL 425		Individual Authors 
		[all topics acceptable]
WCL 445		National Literature 
		[all topics acceptable]
WCL 465		Modern Greek Poetry
WCL 495		Short Fiction 
		[all topics acceptable]
Category B—Communication Strategies
NEXA 384	Words, Culture, and Change
NEXA 397	Communication Between Humans and 
		Other Animals
SPCH 300	Rhetoric and Communication Theory (4)
SPCH 301	Form and Function of the Spoken Word (4)
SPCH 302	Communication and the Social Process (4)
SPCH 303	Communication and Human Interaction (4)
SPCH 502	Interpersonal Communication (4)
SPCH 512	Nonverbal Communication (4)
SPCH 515	Family Communication (4)
SPCH 541	Intercultural Communication (4)
SPCH 542	Intracultural Communication (4)
SPCH 544	Vernacular Communication (4)
Category C—Language/Speech Performance
Course(s) may be selected from among those listed under Required Core Courses Area I Speech or from among those listed below.

AAS 406		Asian American Workshop in Creative Writing
CW 301		Fundamentals of Creative Writing
SPCH 352	Women and Words (4)
SPCH 353	Speech for the Classroom Teacher (4)
THA 450		Children's Literature and Oral Experiences
THA 451		Storytelling and Folk Literature
Category D—Language/Speech Studies
ENG 420		Introduction to the Study of Language
ENG 421		The Structure of English
ENG 424		Phonology and Morphology
ENG 657		Grammar and Rhetoric of the Sentence
SPCH 410	American Phonetics (4)
SPCH 415	Introduction to Speech Science (4)
SPCH 508	Children's Communication (4)
AREA II—LIFE SCIENCE, PHYSICAL SCIENCE, AND MATHEMATICS (Area of Emphasis)

Besides taking the six units required in the core, students who select Area II as the Area of Emphasis must take an additional six units from the courses listed under Area II Required Core Courses plus a minimum of six units selected from among those courses listed below; a minimum of three units in the emphasis must be in Life Science. Upon adviser and department approval, students emphasizing Area II may substitute more advanced upper division courses normally taken by majors in these fields.

Those students interested in emphasizing mathematics should consult with an adviser regarding a new mathematics emphasis, now in the process of being approved.

Life Science
BIOL 230	Introductory Biology I (5)
BIOL 328	Human Anatomy (4)
BIOL 610	Principles of Human Physiology
Physical Science, Mathematics
ASTR 115	Introduction to Astronomy
ASTR 240	Planetarium Astronomy (2)
CHEM 101	Survey of Chemistry
GEOL 100	Investigating the Earth
MATH 124	Elementary Statistics
MATH 220	Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 260	Exploration and Proof
MATH 309	Computation in Mathematics
MATH 560	Computers in the Elementary Classroom
MATH 567	Problem Solving and Discovery in Mathematics
METR 100	Introduction to Meteorology
NEXA 387	Origins of Modern Science
NEXA 389	The Darwinian Revolution
NEXA 392	Culture and Technology
PHIL 350	Philosophy of Science
PHIL 365	Science and Civilization
PHYS 101	Conceptual Physics
AREA III—BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (Area of Emphasis)

Students who select Area III as their area of emphasis must take a minimum of twelve units from one of the following patterns.

Anthropology--Select any four:
ANTH 110	Introduction to Archaeology (CAN ANTH 6)
ANTH 120	Introductory Social and Cultural 
		Anthropology (CAN ANTH 4)
ANTH 310	Kinship and Social Structure
ANTH 315	Regional Ethnography [all topics]
ANTH 319	Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East
ANTH 332	Human Variation Today (4)
ANTH 356	Archaeology of California
ANTH 471	The Ancient Maya
ANTH 475	Ancient South America
ANTH 481	Asian Prehistory
ANTH 550	Culture and Personality
Economics
ECON 100	Introduction to Economic Analysis I 
		(CAN ECON 2) and
ECON 101	Introduction to Economics Analysis II 
		(CAN ECON 4) and
ECON 300	Intermediate Macroeconomics or
	ECON 301	Intermediate Microeconomics and
	any other upper division course in Economics, 
		except ECON 305
Ethnic Studies
Students must select one course from Category A, Historical, and one course from Category B, Psycho-cultural. Two additional courses must be selected, one each from any of the other categories.

Category A—Historical
AIS 150		American Indian History in the 
		United States
AIS 460		Power and Politics in Contemporary 
		Indian America
AAS 200		History of Asian Americans
AAS 310		Chinese in America: Beginning to Exclusion
AAS 331		Japanese Americans in the U.S.
AAS 370		Southeast Asians in America
AAS 456		Pilipinos in America: Problems of 
		Transition
BLS 300		From Africa to America
BLS 301		Africa in Global Perspective
BLS 302		Black Diaspora
BLS 303		Afro-American History
BLS 304		Black People and the American Experience
LARA 376	History of La Raza in the United States
Category B—Psycho-cultural
AIS 530		American Indian Psychology
AAS 315		Chinese American Personality
AAS 335		Japanese American Personality
AAS 355		Psyche and Behavior of Pilipinos
BLS 111		Black Cultures and Personalities
BLS 200		Introduction to Black Psychology
BLS 215		Introduction to Black Family Studies
BLS 515		Black Family Studies
BLS 555		Pigmentation and the Experience of Color
LARA 280	Acculturation Problems of La Raza
LARA 510	Psychodynamics of the La Raza Family 
		Structure
Category C—American Women of Color
AIS 420		American Indian Women
AAS 603		Asian American Women
BLS 335		The Black Woman: A Cultural Analysis
ETHS 571	Women, Class, and Race
LARA 410	La Raza Women
Category D—Ethnic Community Studies
AAS 680		Community: Changes and Development
AAS 695		Seminar on Contemporary Asian American 
		Communities
BLS 125		Black Community Involvement Workshop
BLS 340		Economics of the Black Community
BLS 516		Research Methods in the Black Community
BLS 551		Field Work in Black Studies
LARA 680	La Raza and Community Organizing
LARA 690	La Raza Community Fieldwork
Category E—Interdisciplinary Ethnic Studies
ETHS 220	Asians in America
ETHS 260	Ethnic Studies: The African American and 
		Western Racism
ETHS 275	Ethnic Studies: Issues in La Raza History
Category F—Politics, Government, and People of Color
AIS 205		American Indians and U.S. Laws
AAS 205		Asian Americans and American Ideals and 
		Institutions
BLS 320		Black Politics, Mass Movements, and 
		Liberation Themes
BLS 375		Law and the Black Community
BLS 376		Government, Constitution, and Black 
		Citizens
LARA 276	La Raza, Government, Ideals, and 
		Constitution
Family Studies
Students must select the number of courses as indicated in each of the categories.

Category A—Select one:
CFS 320		Children and Families
CFS 321		Adolescents and Families
Category B—Select two:
CFS 426		Families in Crisis
HIST/SS 469	American Childhoods: Past and Present
SOC 464		The Family (4)
URBS 565	Social Policy and the Family (4)
Category C—Select one:
SPCH 503	Sex Roles and Communication (4)
SPCH 515	Family Communication (4)
Geography
Students must select one course from each of the following categories preferably in the order in which they are listed.

Category A
GEOG 107	World Regions
Category B
GEOG 600	Environmental Problems and Solutions
Category C
GEOG 550	Geography of the U.S. and Canada
AMST 400/GEOG 551 American Regional Cultures
Category D
GEOG 507	Japan and California
GEOG 570	Regional Studies: Selected Regions 
		[all topics]
GEOG 573/HIST/IR 392 Asia in Transition
HIST/IR/SS 393/GEOG 574 Contemporary Asia
Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation—Select any four:
HED 310		Health and Society
HED 312		Consumer Health
HED 315		Drugs and Society
HED 320		Contemporary Sexuality
KIN 457		Culture, Gender, and Movement
KIN 501		Women and Sport
KIN 502		Sport and Social Issues
KIN 504		Psychology of Coaching
REC 300		Leisure and Leadership
REC 380		Developmental Play Processes
REC 410		Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation
REC 420		Leisure and Contemporary Society
History
Students must select the number of courses as indicated in each of the categories for a minimum of twelve units.

Category A—Select zero or one:
HIST 120	History of the United States to 1865 
		(CAN HIST 8)
HIST 121	History of the United States Since 1865 
		(CAN HIST 10)
HIST 418	Society and Politics in American History
Category B—Select one or two:
HIST 420	American Colonial History
HIST 422	The Founding of the American Nation
HIST 424	History of the United States 1827-1877
HIST 426	History of the United States 1877-1916
HIST 427	History of the United States 1916-1945
HIST 428	History of the United States Since 1945
HIST 464	American Ethnic and Racial Relations I: 
		1740-1890
HIST 465	American Ethnic and Racial Relations II: 
		1890-Present
HIST/SS 469	American Childhoods: Past and Present
HIST 480	Thought and Culture in America
Category C—Select one:
HIST 110	History of Western Civilization I 
		(CAN HIST 2)
HIST 111	History of Western Civilization II 
		(CAN HIST 4)
HIST 326	The Byzantine Empire
HIST 327	The Mediterranean World
HIST 334	The Renaissance
HIST 344	Nineteenth Century Europe
HIST 346	Recent European History
NEXA 383	The City in Civilization
Category D—Select one:
HIST 109	Ancient African Civilizations
HIST 112	Latin American Civilizations
HIST 113	Asian Civilizations
HIST 114	Civilizations in Conflict
HIST 115	Modern European Imperialism
HIST/CST 312	Capitalist Hegemony and Third World 
		Resistance
HIST 318	Topics in Comparative History 
		[all topics]
HIST 391	Traditional Asia
HIST/IR 392/GEOG 573 Asia in Transition
HIST/IR/SS 393/GEOG 574 Contemporary Asia
HIST 501	The Latin American Past to 1929
HIST/SS 550	Social Change in Modern Latin America
HIST 603	History of the Middle East
HIST 610	History of Africa
HIST 611	Modern Africa
International Relations
Students must select a minimum of twelve units of course work from one of the following categories.

Category A—Global Development Studies
IR 310		U.S. Foreign Policy (4) and
IR/SS 540	The Rich and Poor Nations (4) and
Select one of the following courses:
	IR 321	African Foreign Policy (4)
	IR 322	Latin American Relations (4)
	IR 323	Middle East: Periphery (4)
	IR 324	Middle East: Heartland (4)
	IR 325	Chinese Foreign Policy (4)
	IR 326	South and Southeast Asia Foreign 
		Relations (4)
Category B—World Perspectives
IR/GEOG/SS 204	Current International Events
IR 310		U.S. Foreign Policy (4)
GEOG 102	The Human Environment (CAN GEOG 4)
GEOG 570	Regional Studies: Selected Regions 
		[all topics]
NEXA--Select any four:
NEXA 330	The Marxian Revolution
NEXA 340	The Nuclear Revolution
NEXA 383	The City in Civilization
NEXA 384	Words, Culture, and Change
NEXA 391	Biological Sex and Cultural Gender
Political Science
Students must select any three or four courses for a minimum of twelve units.

PLSI 100	Understanding Politics
PLSI/SS 106	Political Economy: Theory, Processes, and 
		Institutions
PLSI 300	Scientific Inquiry in Political Science (4)
PLSI 310	Contemporary Issues in American Politics
PLSI 351	Political Theory: The Classical 
		Tradition (4)
PLSI 370	Classical Marxism (4)
PLSI 551	Judicial Power in Public Policy Making (4)
Psychology--Select any four:
PSY 200		General Psychology (CAN PSY 2)
PSY 350		Mental Health
PSY 430		Adolescent Psychology
PSY 431		Developmental Psychology
PSY 435		Behavior Problems of Children
PSY 436		Development of Femaleness and Maleness (4)
PSY 441		Psychology of the Family
PSY 451		Theories of Personality
PSY 491		Learning or
	PSY 492		Perception or
	PSY 493		Motivation or
	PSY 494		Cognitive Psychology
Social Science Interdisciplinary
Students must select courses in one of the following categories.

Category A—Culture in America
AMST 300/SS 410		Perspectives on American Culture
AMST 310/HUM 485	The Arts and American Culture
AMST 400/GEOG 551	American Regional Cultures
AMST 410/HUM 478 	California Culture
Category B—American Sociopolitical Milieu
AMST 300/SS 410		Perspectives on American Culture
AMST 400/GEOG 551	American Regional Cultures
PLSI 310	Contemporary Issues in American Politics
IR 310		U.S. Foreign Policy (4)
Category C—Change
SS 510		Socio-Cultural Change: An Interdisciplinary 
		Analysis or
	SOC 470		Social Change (4) and
IR/PLSI/SS 520	Modernization and Third World 
		Countries or
	IR 540		Rich and Poor Nations (4) and
GEOG 421	Future Environments and
URBS 530/HIST 488 Alternative Urban Futures
Social Work
Students must select the number of courses as indicated in each of the categories.

Category A—Select two:
SW 300	U.S. Social Welfare: Past, Present, and Future
SW 301	U.S. Social Welfare: Problems, Policies, and 
	Programs
Category B—Select two:
SW 350	Child Welfare
SW 352	Gender, Sexism, and Social Welfare
SW 470	Social Differences and Social Work Practice
Sociology—Select any three:
SOC 340	Social Psychology (4)
SOC 362	Deviant Behavior (4)
SOC 461	Ethnic Relations: International Comparisons (4)
SOC 464	The Family (4)
SOC 469	Sex Roles and Society (4)
SOC 472	Social Inequality: Poverty, Wealth, and 
	Privilege (4)
SOC 480	Urban Sociology (4)
Urban Studies
Students must select the number of courses as indicated in each of the categories.

Category A—Select two:
URBS 400/HIST 489 Dynamics of the American City
URBS/PLSI 480	Policy Analysis (4) or
	URBS/GEOG 659 Land Use Planning
Category B—Select two:
URBS/GEOG 433	Urban Transportation (4)
URBS 475	Selected Issues in Urban Studies (3-4) 
		[all topics]
URBS/PLSI 513/GEOG 654 Politics, Law, and Urban Environment (4)
URBS 570	Urban Health Policy
URBS 580	Urban Housing
URBS/HED 582	Homelessness and Public Policy

More Liberal Studies degree program requirements


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