Recreation

College of Health and Human Services
Interim Dean: Don Taylor

Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies
HSS 307
415-338-2030
Web Site: www.sfsu.edu/~recdept
Chair: James F. Murphy

Undergraduate Coordinator: Erik Rosegard
Graduate Coordinator: Patrick Tierney

Faculty

Professors—Dahl, Jaquith, Murphy, Taylor, Tierney

Assistant Professor—Rosegard

Lecturers—Flasher, Holland, Lowe, Mirviss, Neu, Pon, Rifkin, Schilling, Somers

Programs

B.A. in Recreation
Minor in Recreation
Certificate in Youth and Human Services Nonprofit Agency Administration
M.S. in Recreation


Program Scope

The Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies at San Francisco State University, in existence since 1956, has established a reputation for excellence. The faculty members represent a broad range of skills and interests. They are well qualified professors and scholars with many years of practical field experience in diverse leisure service agencies. A bachelor of arts degree in recreation is offered through the department and is accredited by the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) and American Association for Leisure and Recreation (AALR) Council on Accreditation. Accreditation provides broader recognition in the academic community and professional field. Employers can be assured that graduates of accredited programs are fully qualified for entry-level positions. Students from accredited programs are immediately eligible to sit for the Certified Park and Recreation Professional Examination (CPRP) certificationóan increasingly recognized credential in the field.

The recreation major is designed to provide students with the skills necessary for successful entrance into the profession and specialty area of choice. The major can be supplemented with appropriate electives to prepare students for specialized careers within the leisure service delivery system. Students continue through the curriculum requirements until fully qualified for placement as full-time interns during the last semester. Upon successful completion of the internship, students graduate and become employable. The program also includes academic work that focuses on the latest marketing management, clinical, leadership, and programming skills, and the latest computer applications in the recreation field.

The program's most important resource is the diversity and vitality of the San Francisco Bay Area. It's unduplicated myriad of agencies, institutions, and leisure enterprises makes it truly a focal point for international tourism, recreation, and a living laboratory for leisure. Located in this prime area, the program provides opportunities to create professional networks with hundreds of SFSU graduates now in the field, which creates an additional competitive edge in today's job market. The university's extensive library resources complement the department curriculum.

SFSU offers other programs of study in recreation. An undergraduate minor program is designed to complement majors in such diverse fields as child and adolescent development, business, education, psychology, theatre arts, geography, and biology. A graduate program is available for students with experience who wish to pursue advanced training in the areas of community building, leadership, and management. The department and university recognize their responsibility to provide an opportunity for all students to acquire leisure skills. As a service to the students, the department offers a variety of courses that provide skill development and instruction activities such as sailing, camping, arts and crafts, staff supervision, planning cooperative games, adventure activities, and other recreation pursuits. The department also recognizes its responsibility to provide for the general education of the campus community. To that end, it offers several General Education courses in Behavioral and Social Sciences, Humanities, Creative Arts areas, and Segment III.

The Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies in the College of Health and Human Services at San Francisco State University envisions a California where all residents are adequately prepared and situated to realize quality in all that comprises their life's pursuits. The department mission and goals are to:

Students desiring to receive a master's degree, bachelor of arts degree, or minor in recreation should consult with the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies where they will be directed to a faculty adviser related to their area of specific interest. Students interested in the nonprofit sector can obtain a certificate in nonprofit management and should see the American Humanics campus director for advising.

Students are expected to observe university requirements stated in this Bulletin and specific department requirements stated in the department student handbook.

Career Outlook

Every year, millions of people spend an increasing abount of time in pursuit of beneficial leisure and recreation experiences. As the world's leading industry, recreation and leisure spending accounts for approximately one trillion dollars a year. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook published by the U.S. Department of Labor, the overall employment in the leisure and hospitality industry will grow by 17.8 percent,. The arts, entertainment, and recreation division will grow by 28 percent and add 497,000 new jobs by 2012. Job growth will stem from public participation in arts, entertainment, and recreation activitiesóreflecting increasing incomes, leisure time, and awareness of the health benefits of physical activity.

Full-time, trained recreation professionals are needed to develop, organize, and implement programs for the public and nonprofit sector, park districts, municipal recreation agencies, and marinas, private camps, event-planning organizations, and theme parts employ recreation professionals. Agencies serving people with disabilities and the elderly hire recreation therpists to assist their clients. Boys and Girls Clubs, and YM/YWCA are semi-public, nonprofit organizations that account for many of the job opportunities in the field of recreation. Thus, the recreation profession offers diverse employment opportunities for people who are enthusiastic, enjoy working with people, and have acquired the necessary professional skills.

Activities director (spa/resort)   Interpretive specialist   Playground safety inspector
ADA specialist   Leisure consultant   Professional storyteller
Adventure therapist   Leisure/wellness counselor   Program director
]Aquatic facilities operator   Leisure education specialist   Recreation professor
Arts and crafts specialist   Leisure industry entrepreneur   Recreation program supervisor
Attractions manager Lifestyle coach Recreation specialty retailer
Backcountry ski guide Military recreation director Recreation therapist
Camp director Municipal recreation leader Researcher in recreation
Challenge course facilitator Museum curator River guide
Childcare provider Naturalist Ropes course facilitator
City manager Outdoor adventure guide Senior center activities director
Community center director Outdoor recreation specialist Social director (ctruise ships
Conference and event planner Park Administrator Tennis or golf club manager
Employee recreation manger Park concessionaire Tour director
Environmental educator Park maintenance supervisor Tour guide
Executive director (nonprofit) Park operations manager Travel agent
Exposition/trade show director Park planner University activity director
Expressive arts therapist Park ranger Volunteer coordinator
Fitness instructor Park superintendent Youth leader
Hospitality industry worker Play therapist Youth sports coordinator

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RECREATION

On-line course descriptions are available.

Foundation Units
REC 200 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services 3
REC 260 Leisure Travel and Tourism 3
REC 300 Leisure Leadership 3
REC 380 Developmental Play Processes 3
REC 400 Theory of Program Planning 3
REC 410 Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation 3
REC 500 Organization of Recreation and Leisure Services 3
REC 520 Park and Outdoor Leisure Resources 3
REC 550 Planning and Evaluation of Recreation and Leisure Services 3
  Total for foundation 27
Emphasis Area
Students select a minimum of 6 units from the following list of courses based on interest and adviser approval. Suggested Emphasis Areas and related courses:
Commercial Recreation/Tourism (REC 340, 460, 540, 605)
Community Recreation/Nonprofit (REC 330, 340, 370, 440, 470, 570)
Outdoor Recreation/Natural Resources (REC 230, 360, 430, 605
6
REC 230 Growth Through Adventure  
REC 330 Arts and Crafts for Leisure
REC 340 Conference and Event Planning and Management
REC 360 Outdoor Recreation Leadership (1)
REC 370 Principles of Nonprofit Administration
REC 430 Ecology of Outdoor Recreation
REC 440 Urban Recreation and Leisure Services
REC 445 Recreation Therapy and Expressive Arts
REC 460 Recreation Destination Resorts
REC 470 Care Break: Alternative Spring Break Service
REC 540 Administration of Private Recreation Enterprises
REC 560 Current Practices in Parks, Recreation, and Leisure Services (1-3)
REC 570 Developing and Managing Resources in Nonprofit Agencies
REC 605 Eco-tourism: Facilities and Services
  Total for emphasis 6
Internship
In the final spring semester, students complete a 3-unit seminar and a 12-unit Directed Field Experience in an appropriate recreation or leisure services setting. A minimum of 800 hours of paid or volunteer work in recreation settings and completion of all foundation courses and General Education requirements are required prior to enrolling in the Directed Field Experience. Students enroll in REC 660 concurrently with REC 680/690.
15
  REC 660 Seminar in Current Professional Issues  
  REC 680 Directed Field Experience in Recreation and Leisure Services (6)
  REC 690 Directed Management Experience in Recreation and Leisure Services (6)
  Total for internship 15
Additional course work is required for students seeking internships in settings which require special skills; such course work is prescribed in consultation with an adviser.  
Total for major 48

MINOR IN RECREATION

Required Core Units
REC 200 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services or 3
  REC 420   Leisure and Contemporary Society
REC 400 Theory of Program Planning 3
  Total for core 6
Interest Area
In consultation with an adviser, students select a minimum of 9 units from the following electives according to the below areas of interest:
9
Commercial Recreation/Tourism
REC 260 Leisure Travel and Tourism  
REC 340 Conference and Event Planning and Management
REC 460 Destination Recreation Resorts
REC 540 Administration of Private Recreation Enterprise
REC 605 Eco-tourism: Facilities and Services
Community Recreation/Nonprofit
REC 330 Arts and Crafts for Leisure  
REC 340 Conference and Event Planning and Management
REC 370 Principles of Nonprofit Administration
REC 380 Developmental Play Processes
REC 440 Urban Recreation and Leisure Services
REC 470 Care Break: Alternative Spring Break Service
REC 570 Developing and Managing Resources in Nonprofit Agencies
Outdoor Recreation/Natural Resources
REC 230 Growth Through Adventure  
REC 360 Outdoor Recreation Leadership (1)
REC 430 Ecology of Outdoor Recreation
REC 520 Park and Outdoor Leisure Resources
REC 605 Eco-tourism: Facilities and Services
Therapeutic Recreation/Wellness
REC 380 Developmental Play Processes  
REC 410 Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation
REC 445 Recreation Therapy and the Expressive Arts
  Total for interest area 9
Internship
In the final spring semester, students complete a 6-unit Directed Field Experience (REC 680) in an appropriate recreation or leisure services setting. A minimum of 400 hours of paid or volunteer work in recreation settings and completion of all core courses are required prior to enrolling in the Directed Field Experience.
 
REC 680 Directed Field Experience in Recreation and Leisure Studies 6
  Total for internship 6
Minimum total for minor 21

CERTIFICATE IN YOUTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NONPROFIT AGENCY ADMINISTRATION

Campus Directors—Ginny Jaquith, Erik Rosegard

General Information

Nonprofit agencies play an important role in the development and well-being of individuals and communities. To help meet the growing need for qualified leadership in today's non-profit organizations our program inspires and prepares undergraduates for entry-level professional positions in the nonprofit sector. With the resources of American Humanics, Inc. and its national nonprofit partners, SFSU is committed to preparing quality nonprofit leaders, dedicated to making a difference in their community and in the lives of others through the Youth and Human Services Nonprofit Agency Administration Certificate.

Students take courses in a broad-based curriculum designed to develop leadership and management skills in nonprofit organizations. Students are encouraged to consult with the campus director to determine course work and co-curricular activities.

Required Core Units
REC 370 Principles of Nonprofit Administration 3
REC 570 Developing and Managing Resources for Nonprofit Agencies 3
REC 680 Directed Field Experience 6
Total for core 12
Professional Competency Areas
Units selected from the following list with at least 1 course chosen from each area.
15
Community Organization and Group Work
HED 410 Organization and Function of Health Services  
REC 440 Urban Recreation and Leisure Services
REC 470 Care Break: Alternative Spring Break Service
HED 455 Community Organizing and Building for Health
REC 300 Leisure Leadership
SW 410 Human Development and the Social Services
SW/URBS 456 Urban Community Organizing and Citizen Action
Management and Administration
REC 500 Administration of Recreation and Leisure Services  
MGMT 405 Introduction to Management and Organization of Business
MGMT 610 Human Resources Management
SW/URBS 660 Roles of Nonprofit Organizations in Urban Life
SW 302 Introduction to Social Service Organizations (2)
PA 775 Developing Nonprofit Resources
Program Planning
REC 340 Conference and Event Planning and Management  
REC 380 Developmental Play Processes
REC 400 Theory of Program Planning
HED 431 Community Health Education: Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation
  Total for professional competency areas 15
Total for certificate 27

English Proficiency Requirement: Students must meet the English proficiency requirement by demonstrating competence through a written examination during the first semester of enrollment and the completion of a written paper.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN RECREATION

Graduate Advisers—Dahl, Jaquith, Murphy, Rosegard, Taylor, Tierney

General Information

The mission of the Master of Science in Recreation is to serve as a catalyst for the development of emerging entrepreneurial leaders who will advance the recreation, parks, and tourism profession and society by providing a foundation of quality education, service, and research that bridges the gap between theory and practice, cutting edge knowledge, and creative and critical thinking. The program is designed to develop competencies for positions of administrative responsibility in the professional field of recreation, parts, and tourism. Maximum flexibility in choice of course work within the program enables the student both to broaden his/her knowledge of the field and to concentrate on his/her particular area of specialization. A master's degree in recreation provides opportunities in a wide range of career paths, from lifestyle and leisure coaching, adventure therapy, community leadership and therapeutic recreation. Look at the Recreation and Leisure Studies (RLS) student graduate program web site at www.sfsu.edu/~recdept/html/gradhm.htm for current information.

Students interested in this program ordinarily must have received a baccalaureate degree in recreation. However, a degree in a related major (e.g., creative arts, natural science, physical education, psychology, business, special education, public administration, park planning, social welfare, etc.) may be accepted provided such applicants demonstrate knowledge of recreation and leisure services through experience and/or training, and the ability to program and organize recreation in a variety of settings.

Applicants lacking successful field experiences, professional preparation, full-time paid experience, or a related undergraduate degree may be required to complete indicated undergraduate courses and/or experience requirements to become eligible for consideration.

To be considered for admission, applicants must have a 3.0 GPA for the last 60 units of undergraduate work, and submit the following documents to the department: three letters of recommendation, transcripts of all academic work, and a separate departmental application. A personal interview is recommended. Students must also apply separately to the university.

Classified Status

Students admitted to the department under "conditionally classified status" may achieve fully classified status after meeting the conditions set by the department for admission to classified status. Such conditions vary by student experience and undergraduate degree and may include: (a) prerequisite course requirements, such as REC 400, REC 410, REC 420, REC 500, and REC 520, or judged equivalents and/or others deemed necessary; (b) full-time work experience in the field, or judged equivalent, within a specified time frame; and/or (c) a grade of B or better in two graduate courses.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: students must take the Graduate Essay Test (GET) or petition the department's graduate faculty to approve an equivalent demonstration, either prior to or during the first semester of enrollment. In no case will a student be advanced to candidacy until this requirement is met. Level Two: assessment of writing proficiency takes place near the end of the student's course of study, and is based on performance on either the written comprehensive examination or the thesis. An independent literacy assessment, separate from other proficiency standards and requirements, is carried out for either culminating experience requirement.

Advancement to Candidacy

Besides meeting all general requirements, applicants must:

On-line course descriptions are available. Upper division courses are acceptable on approval of the graduate adviser.

Foundation Units
REC 700 Orientation and Professional Development 1
REC 720 Developing Collaborative Leaders in Leisure Services 3
REC 730 Foundations of Leisure 3
Professional Core
REC 810 Research Methods in Recreation and Leisure Studies 3
REC 850 Human Resources Development in Leisure Studies 3
REC 862 Management of Leisure Services 3
REC 880 Trends and Issues in Leisure Services 3
Area of Specialization
Selected courses with adviser approval (maximum of 9 units upper division courses) in areas such as tourism, therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation, gerontology 12
Culminating Experience Option
REC 898 Master's Thesis and Oral Defense or 3
Selection of upper division/graduate recreation courses with approval of graduate major adviser and Master's Comprehensive Written Examination
Total 34

Examination. Those candidates not completing a thesis and oral defense must pass a comprehensive written examination. This written examination broadly assesses the student's integration and synthesis of required foundation and professional core content. The comprehensive written examination may be attempted a total of two times.



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Last modified July 05, 2012 by bulletin@sfsu.edu