Exhibits

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Exhibits

Inside/Outside: Working Our Way Out of the Damaged Now (Design as Dialectics)

Inside/Outside: Working Our Way Out of the Damaged Now

Dates: Feb. 16 - March 30, 2017

Location: Design Gallery, Fine Arts building

Sponsor: Design Gallery, DESIS Philosophy Talks @Studio Time, LUCA Arts DESIS Lab

Hours: Tuesdays through Fridays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: Free

Opening/Reception: March 1, 6-7:30 p.m.

Exhibit Contact: Joshua Singer

Phone: (415) 338-6067

Email: jsinger@sfsu.edu

Website: https://lca.sfsu.edu/events/2016-10-20-070000-2016-12-01-080000/815670

"Inside/Outside" is a discourse manifested as an exhibition of experimental design work. Critical and speculative design and design futures are practices that challenge our expectations, propose new ideas and encourage discourse. This exhibition is a discourse within this practice with a specific philosophical question on how design can reveal the unrealized potentialities of our world (as explicated by a passage by Frankfurt philosopher Theodor Adorno). The exhibition's aim is to offer a dialogue on design as a practice that can "dialectically" change perceptions and reveal unexpressed potentialities. Curated by Joshua Singer and Virginia Tassinari.

 

Mashrabiya: The Art of Looking Back

Mashrabiya: The Art of Looking Back

Dates: Feb. 18 – March 16, 2017

Location: Fine Arts Gallery, Fine Arts building

Sponsor: Fine Arts Gallery

Hours: Wednesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: Free

Opening/Reception: Feb. 18, 1 to 3 p.m.

Exhibit Contact: Fine Arts Gallery

Phone: (415) 338-6535

Email: gallery@sfsu.edu

Website: http://lca.sfsu.edu/events/2017-02-18-080000-2017-03-16-070000/815571

Using the architectural form mashrabiya as a visual trope, this exhibition shows artwork that complicates Western paradigms of viewing and representing Middle Eastern and Islamic culture. Found throughout the Middle East, the mashrabiya is a projecting window that is screened with intricate latticed designs in wood. It is used to shield the domestic space from the public gaze while allowing the inhabitants to survey the street below unseen. Curated by Santhi Kavuri-Bauer, Kathy Zarur, Sharon Bliss and Mark Johnson.

 

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