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Volume 56, Number 8    October 6 , 2008         

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April 2006 Newsmakers

Virtual learning
New video game technology is revolutionizing the way that students are learning. In a Sept. 29 Wall Street Journal article, Sam Gill, professor of information systems, offered insight into his new method of teaching. Gill teaches a business-process management class that analyzes how workers perform their tasks and integrates technology to improve productivity. Despite video game taboos, Gill reaffirms that teaching his students through an interactive video game provides them with more hands-on training. Students are drawn to the video-game aspect of the class, creating a course both beneficial and entertaining. "Students today are not like me," Gill said. "Gaming is a big thing to them. Students can relate better to material if I’m not standing in front of them."

The tides must turn
A collection of educators and ecologistis recently teamed up to address the issue of plastic pollution in the San Francisco Bay and across the world. On Sept. 27 the Marin Independent Journal featured Geosciences Lecturer Matthew Horrigan and his opinion about the growing problem. Horrigan stressed the importance of stopping the pollution, noting a Texas-sized vortex of plastic pollution in the North Pacific Ocean and the threat of plastic to water and bird life. "World War III will be fought between Mother Nature and homo sapiens," Horrigan said.

Sugar and spice
Following the first Presidental Debate, a Sept. 28 KCBS news segment featured Professor of Communication Studies Joseph Tuman and his opinion on the candidates' debate styles as well as advice for future debates. As a former speechwriter and debate adviser, Tuman stressed that Barack Obama must become more assertive to back-up his strength and confidence. Tuman said that by constantly agreeing with McCain throughout the debate, "(Obama) comes across sometimes as (passive) and a willingness to accept what the other person is saying. When that person is being deeply critical of you, you have to answer, you have to respond," Tuman said. 

 

 

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Last modified Oct. 6, 2008 by University Communications.