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HEALTHY COMPUTING EMAIL TIP 560: TURN YOUR HEAD

Have you noticed that your neck is stiffer and that it is more difficult to look behind you? So often as we focus on our work and we do not take breaks, our neck and shoulders stiffen. Increase neck and should movement when you TURN YOUR HEAD.

HOW TO TURN YOUR HEAD*:

Scoot forward and sit straight up at the edge of your chair with your hands resting on your lap and do the following:

--Look to the left as far as you can and remember the spot on the wall. Look straight ahead and relax.

--Bring your right hand to the back of your right side of your neck so that your elbow is pointing straight ahead or slightly to the side. While gently holding on the back of your neck, move the elbow the right and left. Let the bend arm swing to right and left while the head rotates in the opposite direction of the elbow. Repeat about ten times and then drop your arm on your lap and rest.

-- Bring your right hand to the back of your neck so that your elbow is pointing straight ahead. Reach forward and back with the elbow so that the shoulder moves forward and backwards. As you reach forward with your elbow let it go forward and back about three to 6 inches. Repeat about ten times and then drop your arm on your lap and rest.

--Finally, look to the left as far as you can and then come back and relax. Observe how much further you could now rotate to the left. Repeat the same exercise except look to the right and use your left arm with your left hand on the left side of your neck.

Practice this or other movement exercises to increase body flexibility.

* I thank Servaas Mes for teaching this exercise.

The Institute for Holistic Healing Studies and Human Resources sponsor the distribution of Healthy Computing Email Tips. Copyright 2009 Erik Peper, Ph.D. and Katherine Hughes Gibney. Permission to copy and distribute Healthy Computing Email Tips for personal use is granted. Distribution or copying of Healthy Computing Email Tips for commercial purposes is prohibited without prior written consent of the copyright holders.
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