Foreign Languages and Literatures

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
HUM 475
415-338-1421
Chair: Elizabeth C. Wright

Programs

B.A. in Chinese
B.A. in French
B.A. in German
B.A. in Italian
B.A. in Japanese
B.A. in Russian
B.A. in Spanish
Minor in Chinese
Minor in French
Minor in German
Minor in Italian
Minor in Japanese
Minor in Russian
Minor in Spanish
M.A. in Chinese
M.A. in French
M.A. in German
M.A. in Italian
M.A. in Japanese
M.A. in Russian
M.A. in Spanish


Program Scope

Bachelor of Arts

The Department of Foreign Languages offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish. The department also offers a minor in these languages. Programs are designed for students who are planning to use foreign languages in professional careers, as well as for students who wish to acquire an appreciation of the cultures of other peoples. Students may select courses in language, conversation, composition, reading, linguistics, culture, and literature. Some of the programs offer courses in business and translating skills, and literature and culture courses in English.

Students who have had foreign language experience before enrolling at San Francisco State University should consult with an adviser in the specific language program for placement in the proper course in which they can receive credit.

A multimedia foreign language laboratory is open to all students enrolled in any class in the department. Basic level courses usually require preparation using audio and video cassettes, laser discs, and computer programs, located in the multimedia language laboratory.

Major. The Bachelor of Arts requirements for a major in any foreign language are the same for all students, including credential candidates. It is suggested that students intending to major in a foreign language consult with an adviser in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures early enough to assure proper scheduling of essential courses.

Minor. For students who wish to take a minor in a foreign language, the requirements for all seven languages are 21 units. The first two years of language instruction (lower division courses) are preparatory courses. A few lower division courses may be applied to the minor but must be approved upon consultation with an adviser. For the specific upper division courses required for completion of the minor, consult the individual language program.

Upper division courses in the foreign language programs are, in general, conducted in the language under study.

Master of Arts

The department offers the Master of Arts in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish. The various master's programs provide advanced instruction in culture, language, and literature. A limited number of graduate teaching assistant positions are available for students engaged in graduate study in the programs. The M.A. programs are designed to prepare students for a variety of careers. M.A. graduates often become teachers in private or public secondary schools, in community colleges, or after completing doctoral studies, in universities.

Admission to Programs

Students seeking admission to a master of arts program must have completed an undergraduate major comparable to the major in the appropriate language and literature at San Francisco State University.

Applicants without such a major may be admitted conditionally after developing, through consultation with advisers, a program of studies to establish the equivalent of that major. Courses prescribed for equivalency may not be credited toward the master of arts program.

Students in all master of arts programs are required to have a GPA of at least 3.0 in their undergraduate major.

Advancement to Candidacy

In addition to meeting all the university general requirements, students prior to advancement to candidacy must:

If students are unable to meet the above requirements for advancement to candidacy, they may be advised to enroll in additional courses prior to being considered for candidacy. In such cases the courses will not be credited toward the master's degree.

Demonstration of Exit-Level Language Proficiency

Professional level of proficiency in the language studied is demonstrated by satisfactory completion of written and oral comprehensive examinations.

Students interested in any of these programs are urged to contact the department office or the undergraduate or graduate adviser.

International Programs

For majors or minors, the department recommends an overseas experience of academic and cultural studies. Students who participate in the International Programs of the California State University (consult Index for reference) may undertake an academic year at certain designated major institutions of higher learning located outside the United States. All students in the overseas language programs should consult with an adviser in the specific language to ensure that courses taken abroad can be applied to the major, the minor, or the degree at San Francisco State University. For the Chinese, French, German, Italian, and Spanish programs, fifteen (15) of the 30 upper division units required for the major must be taken at the home campus. For the minor, nine (9) of the fifteen (15) to eighteen (18) upper division units must be taken at the home campus. There may also be limits in the other language programs.

Teaching Credentials

A bachelor of arts from San Francisco State University in any of the above languages may be used to fulfill the subject matter requirement for a Single Subject Teaching Credential required to teach in the secondary schools in the State of California. A master of arts in any of these languages may be used to fulfill the state's requirement to teach that subject at the two-year community colleges.

NOTE: While the master's degree may qualify students to teach at the community college level, it will not qualify them to teach at the elementary or secondary levels. A single subject or multiple subject credential is necessary for such employment. (Refer to the section on Credential Programs in this Bulletin for further details.)

Students considering teaching a foreign language and obtaining a teaching credential must see the credential adviser in their language of concentration before planning their program. Specific courses and an assessment of competencies are required for admission to the Secondary Education Credential Program. Students should also contact the Student Service Office in the College of Education, (415) 338-7038, regarding teaching credential information.

Special Courses

First year language courses in Cantonese, Filipino, and Portuguese are offered with some frequency. Consult the Class Schedule.

Career Outlook

Some careers require a foreign language as a primary skill. For those employed in teaching foreign languages, culture and literature, and for those who work as interpreters and translators, a high degree of fluency or near-native competency is required. On the other hand, there are a great number of career alternatives open to people who possess good competency in one or more foreign languages. Local and state agencies as well as the federal government (such as the State Department, the Department of Defense, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Peace Corps) often have openings for people with the above skills. Further employment possibilities are in multinational companies with significant global operations (international marketing and accounting firms, international banking, and other international business), advertising, journalism, publishing, communications, and information services, media and entertainment, travel and tourism, the hotel and restaurant industry, health care, as well as in the arts. Competency in one or more foreign languages will open the door to many exciting careers.


Foreign Languages and Literatures—Chinese

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
HUM 475
415-338-1421
Chair: Elizabeth C. Wright

Program Coordinator and Undergraduate Adviser: Yung-O Biq

Graduate Coordinator: Christina Yao

Faculty

Professors—Biq, Yao

Assistant Professor—Francis

Programs

B.A. in Chinese
Minor in Chinese
M.A. in Chinese


Program Scope

The Chinese Program at San Francisco State University since its inception in 1959 has been one of the most comprehensive degree programs in Chinese, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The joint emphasis on language competence in Chinese (putonghua or guoyu) and an appreciation and understanding of Chinese literature, art, culture, and linguistics offers our students a balanced course of study.

After the basic language sequence is completed (or waived), a minimum of 30 units of upper division work, at least nine (9) of which are electives, is required. The heritage courses, taught in both English and Chinese, provide students with an understanding of one of the world's oldest cultures which may inspire the students to view the modern world from a perspective rooted in the Chinese culture. Some of the innovative courses offered in recent semesters have been: Chinese Literature in Translation, Chinese Cultural Heritage in Translation, Literary Themes in Film, Chinese Idioms As Cultural Expressions, Chinese Language and Modern China. There are also practical courses such as Business Chinese and Teaching Chinese as a Second Language which equip students with career-related language skills.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHINESE

Online course descriptions are available.  Upper division courses are generally conducted in Chinese, and students are expected to use Chinese in their speaking, reading, and writing.

Program Units
CHIN 311 Conversation and Reading 3
CHIN 312 Speech and Writing 3
CHIN 401 Advanced Chinese 3
CHIN 501 Introduction to Classical Chinese 3
CHIN 507 Traditional Chinese Culture 3
CHIN 525 Chinese Applied Linguistics 3
CHIN 601 Chinese Literature in Translation: The Poetic Tradition or 3
CHIN 602 Chinese Literature in Translation: The Narrative Tradition
Upper division electives on advisement 9
Total 30

NOTE: Only six out of the 30 units can be taken from the 600 series.

MINOR IN CHINESE

Program Units
CHIN 311 Conversation and Reading 3
CHIN 312 Speech and Writing 3
CHIN 501 Introduction to Classical Chinese 3
CHIN 507 Traditional Chinese Culture 3
CHIN 525 Chinese Applied Linguistics 3
CHIN 601 Chinese Literature in Translation: The Poetic Tradition or 3
CHIN 602 Chinese Literature in Translation: The Narrative Tradition
Electives on advisement 3
Total 21

MASTER OF ARTS IN CHINESE

Online course descriptions are available.  Upper division courses in Chinese may be considered, upon approval of the graduate adviser.

Program Units
CHIN 821 Seminar in Modern Chinese Literature 3
CHIN 822 Seminar in Classical Chinese 3
CHIN 825 Chinese Linguistics and Teaching/Learning Chinese as a Second Language 3
CHIN 826 Seminar in Chinese Discourse 3
Upper division and graduate courses in Chinese 9
Upper division or graduate electives in Chinese or in related subjects with approval of graduate adviser 6
Graduate course in Chinese on advisement 3
Minimum total 30
  and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations

The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.


Foreign Languages and Literatures—French

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
HUM 475
415-338-1421
Chair: Elizabeth C. Wright

Program Coordinator and Undergraduate Adviser: Delphine Perret

Graduate Coordinator: Delphine Perret

Faculty

Professors—Perret, Wright, E.

Associate Professors—Hamou, Herrera

Programs

B.A. in French
Minor in French
M.A. in French


Program Scope

The French Program offers lower division language courses and upper division language, culture, and literature courses leading to a B.A. in French. Students who have previously studied French should consult with a French adviser for placement at the proper class level. For those students interested in pursuing a secondary school teaching credential, the B.A. in French fulfills the requirements for the single subject credential waiver program. The program also offers graduate seminars in literature, culture, and linguistics leading to the M.A. in French, which allows students to teach at the community college level or to continue graduate study for a doctorate. While many of our B.A. and M.A. graduates pursue teaching careers or further study, a good number go on to careers in other fields such as international law or business.

Our program emphasizes training in the four language skills—listening, speaking, reading, and writing as the basic groundwork for more advanced study of the language, literature, and culture. The aim is to broaden students' cultural perspectives by introducing them to various aspects of French and Francophone cultures as they are manifested throughout the world. Students who complete a French major should have both the linguistic and cultural preparation to be able to function at a fairly advanced level in a French-speaking society or with French speakers, and have developed a tolerance for forms of expression and ways of life different from their own. It is hoped that this will prepare them both to pursue careers and to participate fully in today's and tomorrow's global cultures.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH

Online course descriptions are available. All upper division courses are conducted in French, and students are expected to use French in their speaking, reading, and writing.

Program Units
FR 301 French Phonetics 3
FR 305 French Composition 3
FR 306 Advanced Conversation 3
FR 325 French Linguistics 3
FR 400 French Culture 3
FR 500 Introduction to Literary Texts 3
Upper division electives on advisement 12
Total 30

MINOR IN FRENCH

Program Units
FR 301 French Phonetics 3
FR 305 French Composition 3
FR 306 Advanced Conversation 3
FR 325 French Linguistics 3
FR 400 French Culture 3
FR 500 Introduction to Literary Texts 3
Electives on advisement 3
Total 21

MASTER OF ARTS IN FRENCH

Online course descriptions are available.

Upper division courses in French may be considered, upon approval of the graduate adviser, with the exception of FR 301, 304, 305, 306, 325, 400, and 500.

Program Units
Graduate courses in French 15
Upper division or graduate courses in French language, literature, or civilization 6
One of the following options:
Option I
Upper division or graduate courses in French or in related subjects, with approval of graduate adviser 9
  and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations
Option II
Upper division or graduate courses in French or in related subjects, with approval of graduate adviser 6
FR 898 Master's Thesis 3
  and Master's Comprehensive Oral Examination
Minimum total 30

Written and Oral Examinations Option. Students are admitted to oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.

Master's Thesis Option. Students must pass an oral examination at the end of the semester preceding the semester when they write their thesis.


Foreign Languages and Literatures—German

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
HUM 475
415-338-1421
Chair: Elizabeth C. Wright

Undergraduate Adviser: Ilona Vandergriff

Program and Graduate Coordinator: Anita Antler

Faculty

Professors—Antler, Juretzka, Wiseman

Assistant Professor—Vandergriff

Programs

B.A. in German
Minor in German
M.A. in German


Program Scope

The German Program offers lower division language courses and upper division language, linguistics, culture, and a considerable range of literature courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts in German. The program also offers a full graduate studies program with seminars in literature, culture, and historical language development culminating in a master of arts. A limited number of graduate teaching assistant positions are available for students engaged in graduate study in the program. Many of the program's graduates are now teaching in public or private high schools or, after having been awarded the Master of Arts in German, work as instructors in community colleges or have earned their Ph.D. degree from leading American universities.

The German Program not only provides students with excellent language training, but also acquaints them with the achievements and the values expressed by great figures from the German-speaking areas of Europe, whose contributions to western culture have been enormous in such fields as philosophy, the sciences, social reforms, literature, and music. While the program provides an enriching experience for the mind and for the spirit, its major aim is to prepare students for gainful employment in many different fields in which they can use their acquired skills. To this end, the German program tries to prepare well-rounded graduates proficient in the German language, well-informed about current social, political, and literary trends in Germany and other German-speaking countries, as well as schooled in humanistic thinking.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GERMAN

Upper division courses are generally conducted in German and students are expected to use German in their speaking, reading, and writing.

Program Units
GER 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
GER 325 Applied German Linguistics: Phonetics and Phonemics 3
GER 401 German Culture and Civilization 3
GER 510 German Literature I 3
GER 511 German Literature II 3
Upper division electives on advisement 15
Total 30

MINOR IN GERMAN

Program Units
GER 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
GER 325 Applied German Linguistics: Phonetics and Phonemics 3
GER 401 German Culture and Civilization 3
GER 510 German Literature I 3
GER 511 German Literature II 3
Electives on advisement 6
Total 21

MASTER OF ARTS IN GERMAN

Program Units
GER 700 Seminar in Research Methods 1
GER 745 Seminar in the Development of the German Language 3
Graduate courses in German 12
Upper division or graduate courses in German language, literature, or civilization 6
Upper division or graduate courses in German language, literature, or civilization, or in related subjects with approval of graduate adviser 9
Minimum total 31
  and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations

The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.


Foreign Languages and Literatures—Italian

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
HUM 475
415-338-1421
Chair: Elizabeth C. Wright

Program Coordinator and Adviser: Elisabetta Nelsen

Faculty

Assistant Professors—Concolino, Nelsen

Programs

B.A. in Italian
Minor in Italian
M.A. in Italian


Program Scope

The Italian Program offers the student the possibility of acquiring basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and understanding; a broad and comprehensive background in literature, culture, civilization, and Italian studies as well as the possibility of pursuing a specialized career. Many students study Italian to become language teachers. Many students of music, art, film, archaeology, international relations, history, business, and comparative literature, as well as students planning to become translators and interpreters have discovered the usefulness of Italian. Others take Italian purely for the cultural enrichment they derive from it. The study of Italian is particularly rewarding to those of Italian heritage. It also opens the doors to the CSU International Program Center in Florence, to various Italian art and professional academies, and to Italian universities where students can pursue studies in any field.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ITALIAN

All upper division courses are conducted in Italian, and students are expected to use Italian in their speaking, reading, and writing.

Program Units
ITAL 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
ITAL 325 Practical Linguistics of Italian 3
ITAL 401 Italian Culture and Civilization 3
ITAL 510 Italian Literature—Early Period 3
ITAL 511 Italian Literature—Late Period 3
Upper division electives on advisement 15
Total 30

MINOR IN ITALIAN

Program Units
ITAL 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
ITAL 325 Practical Linguistics of Italian 3
ITAL 401 Italian Culture and Civilization 3
ITAL 510 Italian Literature—Early Period 3
ITAL 511 Italian Literature—Late Period 3
Electives on advisement 6
Total 21

MASTER OF ARTS IN ITALIAN

Program Units
Graduate courses in Italian 15
Upper division or graduate courses in Italian literature, language, or civilization, of which three units must be in literature 6
Upper division or graduate courses in Italian or in related disciplines with approval of graduate major adviser 9
Minimum total 30
and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations

The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.


Foreign Languages and Literatures—Japanese

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
HUM 475
415-338-1421
Chair: Elizabeth C. Wright

Undergraduate Advisers: Yukiko Alam, Midori McKeon, Masahiko Minami

Program and Graduate Coordinator: Eika Tai

Faculty

Associate Professors—McKeon, Tai

Assistant Professors—Alam, Minami

Programs

B.A. in Japanese
Minor in Japanese
M.A. in Japanese


Program Scope

The undergraduate Japanese program focuses on developing proficiency in the language in a socio-cultural context by offering a variety of language training courses and by conducting courses in culture and literature in Japanese. In addition to the required course work, students choose electives from a broad range of subjects, which include various courses in literature and culture as well as in translation, interpretation, and business Japanese. A Single Subject Credential Waiver Program is available for those working towards a career in teaching Japanese in public schools. The Master of Arts in Japanese offers two emphases: Teaching of Japanese as a Foreign Language and Professional Applications of the Language Study. The curriculum for the teaching emphasis prepares students for a career in teaching Japanese at the community college level. Courses offered include linguistics, pedagogy, and culture. The professional applications emphasis helps students acquire competency in their specific occupational goals in areas such as business, government, communication, arts, and other professional fields.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JAPANESE

Upper division courses in Japanese are generally conducted in Japanese, and students are expected to use Japanese in their speaking, reading, and writing.

Program Units
JAPN 301 Japanese Conversation 3
JAPN 302 Japanese Reading and Grammar 3
JAPN 305 Advanced Conversation and Composition I or 3
JAPN 306 Advanced Conversation and Composition II
JAPN 309 Advanced Readings in Japanese 3
JAPN 325 Practical Linguistics in Japanese 3
JAPN 401 Topics in Japanese Culture 3
JAPN 510 Modern Japanese Literature 3
Upper division electives on advisement 9
Total 30

MINOR IN JAPANESE

Program Units
JAPN 301 Japanese Conversation 3
JAPN 302 Japanese Reading and Grammar 3
JAPN 305 Advanced Conversation and Composition I or 3
JAPN 306 Advanced Conversation and Composition II
JAPN 309 Advanced Readings in Japanese 3
Electives on advisement (at least 3 units must be upper division) 9
Total 21

Individual student programs will be designed by an academic adviser, according to student's background and need.

MASTER OF ARTS IN JAPANESE

The Master of Arts in Japanese offers two emphases:

Admission to the Program

For admission to the master's program in Japanese, students must have a bachelor's degree in Japanese or in a field related to the area of intended emphasis with a minimum 3.3 GPA; demonstrate by a departmentally-approved examination the proficiency level in Japanese expected at the conclusion of a baccalaureate major in Japanese; submit two essays (one in English, one in Japanese) stating purpose; and submit at least two letters of recommendation, one of which must be from an individual familiar with the student's academic performance.

Demonstration of Exit-Level Language Proficiency

Professional level of proficiency in Japanese is demonstrated by satisfactory completion of a research project, master's thesis and oral defense, or written and oral comprehensive examinations.

Core Courses for Both Emphases Units
JAPN 750 Seminar in Japanese Linguistics 3
JAPN 800 Seminar in Analysis of Japanese Cultural Studies 3
JAPN 890 Integrative Seminar: Japanese Language and Culture 3
Emphasis (units selected from one of the emphases listed below) 18
Culminating Experience Requirement
One of the following three options: 3
JAPN 895 Applied Research Project
JAPN 898 Master's Thesis and Oral Defense
An additional graduate course on advisement in Japanese language, literature, culture, pedagogy, or professional applications; and Master's Comprehensive Oral and Written Examinations
Minimum total 30
Teaching of Japanese as a Foreign Language Emphasis
JAPN 760 Seminar in Pedagogical Japanese Linguistics 3
JAPN 770 Seminar in Teaching Japanese 3
JAPN 775 Seminar in Materials Development for Teaching Japanese 3
JAPN 780 Practicum in Teaching Japanese 3
Electives selected on advisement 6
Total 18
Professional Applications Emphasis
Units selected on advisement from the following (at least six must be at the graduate level): 12
JAPN 350 Introduction to Translation
JAPN 390 Business Japanese
JAPN 395 Business Writing
JAPN 401 Heian Culture: Culture of Peace
JAPN 401 Japanese Identity
JAPN 401 Japanese Way of Living
JAPN 401 Modern Cultural History of Japan
JAPN 501 Modern Japanese Literature
JAPN 560 Modern Japanese Fiction
JAPN 590 Japanese Women Writers
JAPN 590 Contemporary Japanese Literature
JAPN 690 Introduction to Consecutive Interpretation
JAPN 710 Current Topics: Magazines and Periodicals
JAPN 710 Current Topics: Newspapers
JAPN 710 Current Topics: Radio and Television
JAPN 710 Interpretation Workshop
JAPN 710 Translation Workshop
JAPN 725 Technical Translation
JAPN 730 Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation
JAPN 735 Seminar in Simultaneous Interpretation
JAPN 860 Seminar in Modern Japanese Literature
Electives selected upon advisement (Japanese courses or courses from other departments) 6
Minimum total for emphasis 18

Research Project or Thesis. After initiating a research project (JAPN 895 or 898), graduate students who have chosen either the project or thesis option for the culminating experience must enroll each semester in JAPN 897 until the project or thesis is completed.

Comprehensive Examinations. The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may not be attempted more than two times.


Foreign Languages and Literatures—Russian

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
HUM 475
415-338-1421
Chair: Elizabeth C. Wright

Undergraduate Adviser: Norair Taschian

Program and Graduate Coordinator: Ludmila Ershov

Faculty

Professors—Ershov, Taschian

Programs

B.A. in Russian
Minor in Russian
M.A. in Russian


Program Scope

The Russian Program offers lower division language courses and courses in advanced language, conversation, composition, linguistics, culture, and civilization as well as a considerable range of literature--both in Russian and in English translation. In this post-Soviet era the study of Russian language and culture, and the knowledge of the country as a whole, become even more imperative. More than ever before, our students are either frequently visiting Russia or working there for an extended period of time. In addition, there is now a greater availability of Russian archival material to Western students, researchers, and scholars.

Today Russia's extensive natural resources and other business opportunities stimulate the interest of many businesses throughout the United States and other parts of the world. Cognizant of this reality, the Russian Program strives to implement courses to respond to these various interests, which are also evident among our students. As a result, the program attempts to balance traditional academic offerings with such practically-oriented courses as Business Russian, the Contemporary Russian Press, and a Translation Workshop. Many business, science, and international relations majors take Russian as a minor or as a second major.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RUSSIAN

Upper division courses are generally conducted in Russian, and students are expected to use Russian in their speaking, reading, and writing. Online course descriptions are available.

Program Units
RUSS 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
RUSS 307 Advanced Reading and Composition 3
RUSS 325 Practical Linguistics of Russian 3
RUSS 401 Russian Culture and Civilization 3
RUSS 510 Russian Literature I 3
RUSS 511 Russian Literature II 3
Upper division electives on advisement 12
Total 30

MINOR IN RUSSIAN

Programs Units
RUSS 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
RUSS 307 Advanced Reading and Composition 3
RUSS 401 Russian Culture and Civilization 3
RUSS 511 Russian Literature II 3
Electives on advisement (at least 3 units of which must be upper division) 9
Total 21

MASTER OF ARTS IN RUSSIAN

Program Units
RUSS 700 Seminar in Research Methods 1
RUSS 745 History of the Russian Language 3
Graduate courses in Russian 12
Upper division or graduate courses in Russian literature, language, or civilization 6
Upper division or graduate courses in Russian or in related subjects, with approval of graduate adviser 9
Minimum total 31
  and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations

The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.


Foreign Languages and Literatures—Spanish

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures
HUM 475
415-338-1421
Chair: Elizabeth C. Wright

Program Coordinator and Undergraduate Adviser: Emilio Cabeza-Olías

Graduate Coordinator: Gustavo Calderón

Faculty

Professors—Cabeza-Olías, Calderón, Williams

Programs

B.A. in Spanish
Minor in Spanish
M.A. in Spanish


Program Scope

The Spanish Program offers a substantial variety of courses in language skills as well as in Spanish and Spanish American literature, culture, and civilization. The classes in linguistics, culture, and civilization are aimed at improving one's understanding of the language and the people of the Spanish-speaking community of nations.

In the United States an ever increasing Spanish-speaking population has made Spanish the second most spoken language in the state of California and in other states of the Union. The study and knowledge of this language, therefore, offers career alternatives in practically all fields of work and is definitely an asset when seeking employment.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH

All upper division courses are conducted in Spanish, and students are expected to use Spanish in their speaking, reading, and writing. Online course descriptions are available.

Program Units
SPAN 325 Applied Spanish Linguistics: Phonetics and Phonemics 3
SPAN 326 Applied Spanish Linguistics: Morphology and Syntax 3
SPAN 401 Culture and Civilization of Spain 3
SPAN 405 Culture and Civilization of Spanish America 3
SPAN 500 Introduction to Literary Criticism 3
SPAN 595 Senior Survey in Spanish or Spanish American Literature (taken once
during senior year)
3
Upper division electives on advisement 12
Total 30

MINOR IN SPANISH

Program Units
SPAN 325 Applied Spanish Linguistics: Phonetics and Phonemics 3
SPAN 326 Applied Spanish Linguistics: Morphology and Syntax 3
SPAN 401 Culture and Civilization of Spain 3
SPAN 405 Culture and Civilization of Spanish America 3
Electives on advisement
Three classes chosen in Spanish or with an adviser's approval in a related field (two of which must be upper division)
9
Total 21

MASTER OF ARTS IN SPANISH

Admission to the Program

Those applying to the Spanish Program must demonstrate to the Spanish faculty a record of prior scholastic achievement indicative of potential success as a graduate student. In addition to this general requirement, they must meet the admission requirements established for M.A. applicants in all languages by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.

Furthermore, all applicants to the Spanish Program must take the entrance examination for the master's program in Spanish at San Francisco State. This examination is administered on an individual basis by the university Testing Center. Results of the examination should reach the graduate adviser for Spanish by the following dates: December 15 if the student is applying for Spring semester, and May 1 if applying for the Fall semester. Applicants must achieve an overall score of 70% on the examination.

Online course descriptions are available.

Program Units
Graduate courses in Spanish 15
Upper division or graduate courses in literature, language, or civilization of Spain or Spanish America of which 3 units must be in literature 6
Upper division or graduate courses in Spanish or in related subjects with approval of graduate adviser 9
Minimum total 30
  and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations

Examinations. The semester before candidates plan to take the Spanish comprehensive written and oral examinations, they should contact the graduate adviser in order to arrange for a screening interview. The screening committee consists of three faculty members who assess the candidates' preparation and advise him/her on areas of study, if any, that need more attention before the examinations. Candidates will not be screened until they have satisfied the English proficiency (GET) requirement.

The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.



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