Speech Communication

College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of Speech and Communication Studies
HUM 282
415-338-1597
Chair: Susan Shimanoff

Graduate Coordinator: Patrick Hunt

Academic Office Coordinator: Donna Smith

Faculty

Professors--Busby, Chaney, Folb, Hunt, Imahori, Jenkins, Medcalf, Rebstock, Shimanoff, Terris

Associate Professors--Chung, Johnson, Tuman, Yep

Assistant Professor--Isaacson

Programs

B.A. in Speech Communication: Concentration in Individual Major in Communication Studies

B.A. in Speech Communication: Concentration in Intercultural Communication

B.A. in Speech Communication: Concentration in Organizational Communication

Minor in Speech Communication

M.A. in Speech Communication

Program Scope

Mission of the Department.The Department of Speech and Communication Studies is committed to the study of human communication in various contexts from multiple and interconnected perspectives in such a way as to contribute to a more humane world. Through communication humans form identities, connect with one another, examine values, enact cultures, and work collectively.

The department examines how people express themselves verbally and nonverbally, how people listen to others, and how symbols relate to human behavior. It acknowledges, appreciates, and integrates human diversity in its various forms. It studies human communication in culturally and socially diverse contexts. It does so by using a variety of methods and technologies to discover and share knowledge about communication and to analyze, interpret, and perform discourse. Areas of study include face to face interaction, group process, organizational communication, rhetoric, advocacy, intercultural communication, and performance of literature and oral traditions.

Students of speech communication can expect to develop skills essential for leadership, career development, and for understanding and interpreting events. They learn to advocate and critically debate ideas in social and political settings, appreciate diverse communication styles, work productively in task-oriented groups, and engage in rewarding interpersonal relationships.

The department works to express, as accurately and clearly as it can, what it perceives, feels, and believes, encouraging students to do the same, so that it may engage openly in genuine dialogue. It also encourages the practice of hearing and honoring a variety of voices and celebrating creative and humane approaches to solving complex human problems in our local and global communities.

Advising.Students must work with an adviser in designing their academic programs for the degree in Speech Communication. Students must consult with their adviser at the start of the program, and every student's application for graduation (undergraduate) must be signed by an adviser who has worked with that student and has approved the major program. Students may select an adviser or ask to be assigned to an adviser, by contacting the department.

Advising is also available for pre-law students.

Special Programs.See advisers before selecting these programs.

Forensics:An intercollegiate program in debate, individual speaking, and competitive individual events such as oral interpretation, readers' theatre, and persuasive speaking. Adviser--Tuman.

Liberal Studies Program:This interdisciplinary program can lead to the Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential in preparation for teaching grades K-8. Speech Communication (in conjunction with English Language Arts) is one of the core subject areas for this major. Advisers--Chung, Johnson, Medcalf, Terris.

English Language Arts:Students who wish to teach at the secondary level (grades 7-12) may prepare for the Secondary Credential Program with a subject matter program in English Language Arts. A program that combines Speech Communication and English is available. Adviser--Chaney.

Career Outlook

Graduates in Speech Communication have an excellent track record in entering their chosen career fields and in attending graduate and professional schools. Speech and Communication Studies graduates have secured positions as customer relations officers, public relations managers, human resources trainers, employment specialists, marketing representatives, investigators of civil rights, broadcasters, news reporters, sales representatives, and counselors to name a few examples.

Advisers can assist students in planning concentrations that are attractive to graduate schools and to employers. Each spring the department sponsors Career Day, a day long event that brings back graduates to discuss their preparation for and experience in various careers, including public relations, education, law, organizational communication, media, intercultural consulting, conflict interventions, etc. Speakers address the preparation provided both by the B.A. and the M.A. programs.

The department's internship program has helped many of these speakers begin their careers. The program offers over 160 internship opportunities. Students are encouraged to seek advising from the department's internship coordinator.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION

Requirements for the Major

Students pursuing a B.A. in Speech Communication must complete a 44-unit program consisting of twenty units of core requirements and additional requirements within one of three concentrations. The core requirements include five core courses from five core areas: Communication Theory and Human Interaction, Symbol Systems, Rhetorical Theory and Criticism, Public Communication Skills, and Communication and Diversity.

A maximum of eight units outside of Speech and Communication Studies may be counted toward the major and these units must be approved by a major adviser.

A maximum of eight units in any combination of SPCH 685, 695, or 699 may be counted toward the major.

Courses used to fulfill Segment I, General Education requirements, cannot be used to fulfill major requirements. Upon the approval of an adviser, up to twelve units of other lower division units may be counted toward the major.

Courses for this discipline are listed in alphabetical sequence (consult Index for page reference).

Units

Core Area Requirements

Upon the recommendation of a major adviser 
and approval of the department chair,
students may substitute a course in a core
area to satisfy the respective core require-
ments.
Communication Theory and Human 
Interaction Area
4
SPCH 321	Communication Theory
Symbol Systems Area		4
SPCH 331	Verbal and Nonverbal Symbols
Rhetorical Theory and Criticism Area		4
SPCH 341	Rhetorical Theory
Public Communication Skills Area		4
SPCH 351	Public Speaking 
Communication and Diversity Area		4
One course selected from:
SPCH 541	Intercultural Communication
SPCH 542	Intracultural Communication
SPCH 503	Sex Roles and Communication
SPCH 525	Sexual Identity and Communi-

	cation
Total for core		20

Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communication: Concentration in Individual Major in Communication Studies

Core Area Requirements (see above)		20
Courses in Speech and Communication Studies 
with a related and coherent focus or
emphasis selected with the approval of a
major adviser. One course must be a
research methods course (SPCH 661, 662,

or 663.)		24
Total for major		44

Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communication: Concentration in Organizational Communication

Core Area Requirements (see above)		20
SPCH 522	Communication Analysis in 
Organizations 4
SPCH 661	Communication Research 
Strategies 4
SPCH 695	Speech Communication Internship		4
Elective courses related to Organizational 
Communication selected with approval
of a major adviser (may include up to

eight units from allied departments)		12
Total for major		44

Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communication: Concentration in Intercultural Communication

Core Area Requirements (see above)		20
SPCH 541	Intercultural Communication		4
SPCH 542	Intracultural Communication		4
SPCH 661	Communication Research 
Strategies 4
Elective units related to Intercultural Communi-
cation with approval of a major adviser
(may include up to eight units from allied

departments)		12
Total for major		44

MINOR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION

Three courses (twelve units), each of which is from a different one of the following core areas and eight units selected with approval of an adviser in Speech and Communication Studies. Upon the recommendation of a minor adviser and approval of the department chair, students may substitute a course in a core area to satisfy the respective core requirements. Courses used to fulfill Segment I, General Education requirements, cannot be used to fulfill minor requirements. With consent of an adviser, up to eight units of other lower division units in Speech Communication may be counted toward the minor.

One course selected from three of the 
following core areas 12

Communication Theory and Human
Interaction Area

SPCH 321	Communication Theory (4)

Symbol Systems Area

SPCH 331	Verbal and Nonverbal 
Symbols (4)

Rhetorical Theory and Criticism Area

SPCH 341	Rhetorical Theory (4)

Public Communication Skills Area

SPCH 351	Public Speaking (4)

Communication and Diversity Area

SPCH 541	Intercultural Communication (4)
SPCH 542	Intracultural Communication (4)
SPCH 503	Sex Roles and Communica-
tion (4)
SPCH 525	Sexual Identity and Communica-
tion (4)
Additional units on advisement in Speech 

Communication		8
Total for minor		20

MASTER OF ARTS IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION

Admission to Program

The requirements for admission are an undergraduate major in Speech Communication and a 3.0 or better upper division grade point average. Applicants not meeting these criteria are eligible for conditional admission. Conditions may vary from completing four to twelve units of approved undergraduate courses in Speech Communication to earning a B or better in the initial three graduate courses including Speech 700, Introduction to Graduate Study. No units used in fulfilling prerequisites for advancement to classified standing may be counted towards the satisfaction of course requirements in the graduate program. The Graduate Record Examination and two letters of reference are required for admission.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One:students must take and pass the GET (Graduate Essay Test) prior to enrolling in the first semester of graduate work. Students who fail the GET examination will be directed into an appropriate writing skills course; passing the GET or the recommended course will satisfy this requirement. Level Two:satisfactory completion of master's thesis or written comprehensive examination or creative project.

Courses for this discipline are listed in alphabetical sequence (consult Index for page reference). Upper division courses offered by the department may be considered, upon approval of the graduate adviser, except public performance courses.

Units

Core Requirements

SPCH 700	Introduction to Graduate Study		4
SPCH 771	Communication Research 
Strategies or
SPCH 772	Field Research Methods		4
Three additional graduate seminars in Com-
munication Studies upon advisement.
Seminars must be from SPCH 721-760,
and/or SPCH 880 12
Electives on advisement		12
One of the following:		3
SPCH 894	Creative Work Project
SPCH 896	Directed Readings in Speech 
Communication and
Written Comprehensive Examination

SPCH 898	Master's Thesis
Minimum total		35
NOTE:No more than eight units may be from upper division courses regardless of department; no more than eight units, graduate or undergraduate, may be from an allied department; and no more than eight units may be in any combination of SPCH 850-852, SPCH 855, or SPCH 899.

Master's Thesis or Creative Work Project.Each candidate who selects the option of a Master's Thesis or Creative Work Project must complete a satisfactory draft proposal. After the draft is approved by a committee, composed of a minimum of two faculty members, the Proposal for Culminating Experience Requirement form is signed and filed in the Graduate Division office. A final conference for approval of the completed thesis or creative work project is held with the candidate and his/her committee.

Master's Written Comprehensive Examination.Each candidate who selects the option of Master's Written Comprehensive Examination must complete a satisfactory proposal for three comprehensive examinations. After the proposal is approved by a committee, composed of a minimum of three faculty members, the candidate has one regular semester in which to complete the examinations. A final approval conference is held with the candidate and the committee.



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