Consumer and Family Studies/Dietetics

College of Health and Human Services
Dean: Donald P. Zingale

Department of Consumer and Family Studies/Dietetics
BH 329
415-338-1219
Chair: Jill Armstrong

Graduate Coordinator: Jill Armstrong

Faculty

Professors--Armstrong, Clarke, Fehrman, Rabolt, Sands, Seiden, Sim, Stark

Associate Professors--Johnson-Carroll, Schrock

Programs

B.S. in Dietetics

B.A. in Family and Consumer Sciences

B.A. in Family and Consumer Sciences: Concentration in Clothing and Textiles

B.A. in Family and Consumer Sciences: Concentration in Interior Design and Housing

Minor in Family and Consumer Sciences

M.A. in Family and Consumer Sciences

Certificate in Dietetics: Focus on Older Adults

Program Scope

Students in the accredited Consumer and Family Sciences/Dietetics programs develop university-level competencies requisite for employment in a variety of professional roles. Among these roles are: human services provider; director and/or supervisor of a child care center or nursery school program; dietetic intern; food specialist; interior designer; consumer adviser or advocate; furniture or fashion merchandiser; family finance counselor; apparel designer; textile specialist; teacher at the secondary, adult education, or community college levels; cooperative extension family and consumer scientist; and/or other roles concerned with the well-being of individuals and families. Undergraduate majors in the Consumer and Family Studies/Dietetics Department acquire detailed knowledge about: (1) the roles of individuals and families at all social, economic, and age levels; (2) human growth and development and the changing needs of individuals and families throughout the life cycle; (3) management of personal and family resources in the solutions of problems related to the provision of food, clothing, shelter, and emotional support for each individual; (4) the interrelationships which exist between individuals, families, and communities; and (5) the functioning of values, decision-making, communication, creativity, problem-solving, and other such processes as they relate to human development and daily living.

Courses in Consumer and Family Studies/Dietetics also provide a general education perspective.

The B.A. in Family and Consumer Sciences includes formal concentrations in: Clothing and Textiles, and Interior Design and Housing. Informal emphases on advisement are available in child development, family relationships, foods and nutrition/foodservice management, and single subject teaching.

Students who earn a baccalaureate in family and consumer sciences or dietetics, with supporting courses in appropriate fields and with a 3.0 grade point average, may qualify for admission to the Master of Arts in Family and Consumer Sciences. Graduate study prepares one for entry into advanced professional assignments in education, business, government, human services, or communications.

The Master of Arts in Family and Consumer Sciences is aimed toward: increasing competencies for teaching home economics courses in colleges and universities; developing competencies needed in professional roles related to business, extension, community services, and health; developing competencies essential for supervising and administering consumer and family sciences programs; and increasing competencies for teaching family and consumer sciences at the secondary levels. The program also prepares one for further graduate study.

Students are expected to observe the general requirements outlined in this Bulletinand to consult with a graduate adviser. Requests for an adviser should be directed to the department chair.

A 28-31 unit graduate certificate program in Dietetics: Focus on Older Adults provides for the knowledge and practice requirements of The American Dietetic Association to meet eligibility to sit for the examination for Registered Dietitian. The student rotates through various facilities in the community to gain the appropriate practice and experiences required.

Career Outlook

There are almost no limits to the types of careers open to graduates in Consumer and Family Studies/Dietetics. Graduates with a baccalaureate degree are employed in business; community service; education; journalism, television and radio; and health and hospitality units. Students seeking the Single Subject Teaching Credential or the California Children's Center Instructional Supervision Permits should consult the department. An internship or AP4 practice program are two means by which graduates of the B.S. in Dietetics may become eligible to take the examination to become a Registered Dietitian (R.D.).

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN DIETETICS

This degree prepares students for entry level careers in food service systems management and/or nutrition education positions in industries or government agencies. Students earning an appropriate grade point average are eligible to compete for continued training in an approved dietetic internship or AP4 (Approved Pre-Professional Practice Program) to gain eligibility to sit for the R.D. examination. In order to ensure completion of all degree and competency requirements, students must consult on a regular basis with the designated dietetic coordinator. Students who anticipate credits earned at another institution being accepted in lieu of courses required for the degree at San Francisco State University must obtain approval from the designated dietetic coordinator.

The Bachelor of Science in Dietetics is a 126-unit degree. The program meets the new Standards of Education (Plan V) of The American Dietetics Association. The program provides competencies in the three areas of dietetics and meets the 24 knowledge requirements.

Students enrolled as dietetics majors should consult the dietetic program coordinator for planning and evaluation of courses transferred from other institutions. Students should consult the course descriptions in this Bulletinfor prerequisites and corequisites.

Courses must be completed with a 2.0 grade point average and no grade below a C- or CR. No more than six units may be completed with the CR/NC grading option in the Foundation Requirements.

A student will receive a verification of completion of Plan V requirements if an overall GPA of 2.7 and a GPA of 3.0 in the Professional Requirements have been achieved.

Courses for this program are listed in alphabetical sequence (consult Index for page reference).

Units

General Education Requirements

MATH 124	Elementary Statistics (to meet quan-
titative reasoning requirement) 3
General Psychology or Sociology or Social 
Science 105 3
General Microbiology with laboratory equiva-

lent to BIOL 210/211		4
Total for general education		10

Foundation Requirements

CHEM 111	General Chemistry I		5
CHEM 113	General Chemistry II (lecture only)		3
CHEM 130	General Organic Chemistry		3
BIOL 328	Human Anatomy		4
CFS 250	Foods, Production, and Service		3
DFM 152	Computer Applications in Food-
service Management and Nutrition 3
DFM 253	Nutrition in Health and Disease		3
MGMT 405	Introduction to Management and 

	Organizational Behavior		3
Total for foundation		27

Professional Requirements

In addition to the general education and foundation courses, the following are required of all dietetic students. Prerequisite to enrollment in these courses requires a grade of C- or better in the General Education and Foundation Requirements.

BIOL 610/611	Principles of Human Physiol-
ogy and Laboratory 4
CHEM 349	General Biochemistry		3
CFS 325	Transitions in the Family Life Cycle		3
CFS 353	Foodservice Systems Management		3
CFS 653	Nutrition Education Experiences 
for Young Children 1
DFM 350	Experimental Food Study		4
DFM 450	Advanced Nutrition		3
DFM 451	Nutritional Assessment in the 
Community 3
DFM 452	Foodservice Layout and Design		3
DFM 458	Management of Quantity Food 
Purchase and Production 3
DFM 484	Clinical Dietetics		3
DFM 485	Seminar in Clinical Nutrition and 
Patient Care 3
DFM 655	Professional Communication in 
Dietetics 3

MGMT 610	Human Resource Management		3
Total professional requirements		42

Electives

Units chosen from one of the following 

interest areas listed below		3
Total for major		72

Recommended Electives

FOODSERVICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT

ACCT 100	Principles of Financial Accounting
CFS 455	Food, Beverage, and Catering 
Management
MGMT 613	Management of Job Safety and 
Health

CLINICAL NUTRITION/PATIENT CARE

CFS 427	Families with Alcohol/Drug 
Dependency and Eating Disorders
NURS 500	Death and Dying in Contemporary 
Society (2-3)
BIOL 326	Disease!

COMMUNITY DIETETICS

CFS 426	Family Crises
CFS 453	Nutrition in the Life Cycle
H ED 420	Epidemiology

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

The major enables a student to specialize in one of five subject areas or to generalize. The Single Subject Credential prepares one for teaching in family and consumer sciences education programs. The common core of the Bachelor of Arts is devoted to students acquiring understanding about child growth and development; family relationships; management dynamics; food and nutrition, clothing and shelter as solutions to the physical, social, and psychological needs of individuals and families; sensitivities to the needs and value systems of individuals, families, and groups which vary by age, socio-economic status, and ethnic heritage; and the role expectations of professional family and consumer scientists. Students pursuing the liberal arts major, depending upon their areas of specialization, may complete field experiences in business, industry, government, or private agencies. These field experiences serve as integrating experiences for students prior to their entry into professional roles.

In order to ensure completion of all degree requirements, students are expected to consult on a regular basis with an adviser. Students who wish credits earned at another institution to be accepted in lieu of courses offered for the major at San Francisco State University must obtain acceptance from the instructors of the courses and the department chair. To select an adviser and to set up a file, see the department secretary.

The B.A. program permits specialization in one of the following areas:

Prerequisites: 0-12 units depending on subject matter interest

Units

Core Courses

CFS 312	Families, Individuals, and Environ-
ments 3
CFS 412	Senior Integrative Seminar: 
Professional Focus 3
Units chosen from the following (to include 
the course in the student's concentration
or emphasis) 9
CFS 252	Nutrition
CFS 320	Children and Families
CFS 325	Transitions in the Family Life 
Cycle
CFS 364	Fashion, Clothing, and Society
CFS 430	Management Dynamics: Life 
Goals and Decisions
CFS 542	Human Dimensions in Housing 

	and Interiors
Total for departmental core		15

Concentration

Concentration or recommended pattern of 
electives 30-42
Students may select the Concentration in 
Clothing and Textiles (see below); the
Concentration in Interior Design and
Housing (see below); or one of the
following subject matter emphases:
child development/family relations, or
foods and nutrition/foodservice

management
Total for major		45-57
Units

Clothing and Textiles Concentration--57 units

Prerequisite courses			12
The following General Education courses par-
tially meet the Segment I, Basic Subjects,
and Segment II, Arts and Sciences
requirements.
BA/MATH 110	Mathematics Analysis for 
Business
ECON 305	Economic Analysis for Non-
Majors
CFS 240	Color and Design
One course selected from the following:
S S 105	Individual, Culture, and Society: 
Their Interaction in America
S S 360	The Individual in Modern 
Society
PSY 200	General Psychology
Departmental core(see above)		15
One course selected from the following:		3
CFS 160	Clothing Study I
CFS 161	Clothing Analysis
CFS 366	Textiles		3
CFS 367	Textiles Laboratory		1
CFS 369	Fashion Merchandising		3
CFS 465	Clothing and Textiles in the World 
Marketplace			3
CFS 568	Culture and Historical Costume		3
One course selected from the following:		1-3
CFS 460	Computer Applications in Cloth-
ing and Textiles Research (1)
CFS 462	Computer-Aided Apparel Design
One course selected from the following:		3
CFS 461	Clothing Design Problems
CFS 464	Seminar: Fashion, Clothing, and 
Society Research
CFS 466	Textile Analysis and Testing
Electives chosen from one of the following 

options on advisement		8-10
Total		57
Units

Fashion Merchandising Option

Units selected from the following:		6
CFS 365	Fashion Forecasting (2)
CFS 486	Field Experience: Fashion Mer-
chandising (1-3) and
CFS 487	Seminar: Fashion Merchan-
dising (2)
CFS 565	Fashion and the Consumer
Related electives chosen from the following:		2-4
CFS 432	Consumer Issues and Public Policy
CFS 699	Special Study (1-3)
BICS 263	Introduction to Computer Informa-
tion Systems
MKTG 431	Marketing
MKTG 432	Public Relations
MKTG 436	Retail Management

MGMT 342	Women in Management
Total for option		8-10
Units

Clothing Design and Textiles Option

Units selected from the following:		6
CFS 260	Fashion Illustration
CFS 360	Clothing Study II
CFS 362	Clothing Design I
CFS 363	Clothing Design II
CFS 481	Consumer and Family Studies/
Dietetics Field Experience
CFS 568	Culture and Historical Costume
CFS 657	Current Concepts in Consumer 
and Family Studies/Dietetics
Related electives chosen from the following:		2-4
CFS 699	Special Study (1-3)
DAI 321	Introduction to Computer-Aided 
Drafting
DAI 521	Industrial Computer-Aided Design
ART 222	Exploration in Textiles
ART 521	History of Textiles
IBUS 330	International Business and Multi-
cultural Relations
IBUS 430	Small Business Export-Import 
Management
CHEM 130	General Organic Chemistry
CHEM 334	Organic Chemistry I Labora-

	tory (2)
Total for option		8-10
Units

Interior Design and Housing Concentration--
57 units

Prerequisite courses		12
The following General Education courses meet 
the Segment II--Humanities and Creative
Arts requirements.
ART 202	Western Art History
ART 231	Explorations in Drawing and 
Painting
CFS 240	Color and Design
DAI 110	The Arts of Industry
Departmental core(see above)		15
CFS 242	Graphic Communication for Interior 
Design 3
CFS 341	The Materials of Interior Design		3
CFS 344	Interior Design Solutions I		3
CFS 347	Housing for People with Special 
Needs 3
CFS 349	The Housing Structure and Its 
Component Parts 3
DAI 300	Design I		3
DAI 321	Introduction to Computer-Aided 
Drafting 3
Nine units selected from either Interior Design 

or Housing electives (see below)		9
Total		57

Interior Design Electives

ART 222	Explorations in Textiles or
ART 260	Explorations in Photography or
ART 521	History of Textiles or
CFS 366	Textiles or
CFS 243	Delineation for Interior 
Designers
CFS 342	Heritage of Housing and Interior 
Design
CFS 344	Interior Design Solutions I
CFS 444	Interior Design Solutions II
CFS 481	Consumer and Family Studies/
Dietetics Field Experience
CFS 540	Contemporary Design in Housing 
and Interiors

Housing Electives

CFS 342	Heritage of Housing and Interior 
Design or
HUM 495	Architecture and American Life
CFS 366	Textiles
CFS 435	Family Life Styles in American 
Society
CFS 436	Human Resources and Time 
Management
CFS 481	Consumer and Family Studies/
Dietetics Field Experience
CFS 540	Contemporary Design in Housing 
and Interiors
CFS 541	America's Housing Problems
GEOG 455	Geography of Ethnic Communities
URBS 580	Urban Housing

MINOR IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER AND SCIENCES

Units

Core Courses

CFS 312	Families, Individuals, and Environ-
ments 3
Units chosen from the following		6
CFS 252	Nutrition
CFS 320	Children and Families
CFS 325	Transitions in the Family Life 
Cycle
CFS 364	Fashion, Clothing, and Society
CFS 412	Senior Integrative Seminar: 
Professional Focus
CFS 430	Management Dynamics: Life 
Goals and Decisions
CFS 542	Human Dimensions in Housing 
and Interiors
Recommended Electives		15
In consultation with an adviser, select fifteen 
units in one of the following areas: child development/family relations; clothing
and textiles; foods, nutrition, foodservice
management; interior design/housing;

general
Total		24

MASTER OF ARTS IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER AND SCIENCES

Admission to Program

Advancement to Candidacy

In recommending for advancement to candidacy, the department assesses a student's ability on the basis of scholastic records, results of any special examinations or assignments that may be required, and any evidence related to professional experience. The data are used diagnostically by the adviser in planning a program with each candidate.

Written English Proficiency Requirement
Level One:demonstrated by successfully completing the GET (Graduate Essay Test). Level Two:demonstrated by submission of a term paper written to fulfill a requirement for CFS 700.

Program Requirements

Courses for this discipline are listed in alphabetical sequence (consult Index for page reference). Most upper division courses offered by the department may be used but must have the approval of a graduate adviser.

Units

Program

CFS 794	Seminar in Research or
ISED 797	Seminar in Educational Research		3
CFS 700	Seminar: Trends and Issues in 
Family and Consumer Sciences 3
Graduate seminar in area of concentration:
CFS 720, 740, 750, 760		3
Graduate and upper division courses in con-
sumer and family studies selected upon
approval of graduate major adviser 12-15
CFS 898	Master's Thesis or
CFS 895	Field Study		3
Electives selected upon approval of graduate 

major adviser		3-6
Minimum total		30

CERTIFICATE IN DIETETICS: FOCUS ON OLDER ADULTS

Before being considered for acceptance to this certificate program, the student must first be eligible in accordance with all university requirements as outlined in the section Certificate Programs of this Bulletin. This same section also includes university program guidelines and procedures to be followed in filing for the award of the certificate when it is completed.

Admission to Program

Written English Proficiency Requirement
This requirement is met through the Graduate Essay Test (GET) administered by the Testing Center and through papers submitted to the faculty in the Department of Consumer and Family Studies/Dietetics. Students who do not pass the GET will be required to take EDUC 614.

Units

Program

DFM 658	Foodservice Systems in Facilities 
for Older Adults 3
DFM 785	Nutritional Care for Older Adults		3
One of the following:		3-4
GRN 500	Gerontology: An Interdisci-
plinary Perspective
GRN 705	An Interdisciplinary Synthesis
PSY 630	Psychology of Aging (4)
SOC 630	Sociology of Aging (4)
CFS 750	Seminar in Nutrition and Food 
Technology: Human Nutrition 3
DFM 881	Internship (includes 25-35 hours per 
week supervised practicum experi-
ence in various facilities for one
academic year to total fifteen units) 15

Electives selected on advisement		1-3
Minimum total		28-31
Students in the program basically have the following schedule:

Units

Fall Semester

GRN 500/GRN 705/PSY 630/SOC 630		3-4
DFM 658		3
DFM 881	Internship		7

Electives		1-3
Total for semester		14-17

Spring Semester

CFS 750		3
DFM 785		3

DFM 881	Internship		8
Total for semester		14
The internship units consist of 25-35 hours per week of supervised experiences under the direction of a dietitian or foodservice manager in a facility or program serving older adults. The internship is based on specific experiences and competencies which the student is expected to complete. Students are placed in a foodservice setting for the first semester and in a nutritional care setting for the second semester. A total of 900+ hours is required in the internship segment, when both Fall and Spring are combined, in order to meet requirements of The American Dietetic Association. Students take DFM 881 for seven units in Fall and DFM 881 for eight units in Spring semester. Additional affiliations in community-based programs for older adults are included throughout the program on a two-three week basis to enable students to have a broad array of experiences in dietetics. The approximate division is two-fifths nutritional care, two-fifths foodservice, and one-fifth community competencies.

The student is expected to be full-time in the certificate program and all students move through the program in a cohort. No part-time enrollment is allowed due to the requirements of the internship portion for continued practice experience. The practice component (DFM 881) is scheduled as four 7-8 hour days per week in a facility or facilities to correspond to the work schedule of the preceptor to whom the student/intern is assigned. Class work is scheduled usually in the late afternoon or evening.



SFSU Home   Search   Need Help?  

1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (415) 338-1111

Last modified July 02, 2012 by bulletin@sfsu.edu