English


College of Humanities
Dean: Nancy McDermid

Department of English Language and Literature
HUM 287-289
415-338-2264
Chair: Stephen E. Arkin

Undergraduate Coordinators:
Composition--Elise Earthman
ESL--Pat Porter
Language--Elizabeth Whalley
Literature--Jonathan Middlebrook

Graduate Coordinators:
Composition--Jo Keroes
Linguistics--Rachelle Waksler
Literature--Wai-Leung Kwok
TESOL--Elizabeth Whalley

Faculty

Professors--Arkin, Arthur, Bassan, Breen, Brogan, Brown, Chan, J., Doub, Feinstein, Green, Gregory, M., Gretton, Jain, Keroes, Kohn, Krasny, Langton, Lucas, McKay, Middlebrook, Porter, Renaker, Robinson, G., Robinson, W., Scovel, Solomon, Tick, Tuma, Weltner, Whalley, Wolf, Zimmerman

Associate Professors--Earthman, Evitt, Gillotte, Lyles, Peel, Shih, Sommers, Voloshin, Waksler, Weinstein

Assistant Professors--Avery, Kwok, Nakayama, Schoerke, Stec, Swanson

Programs

B.A. in English: Concentration in Individual Major

B.A. in English: Concentration in Language Studies

B.A. in English: Concentration in Literature

Minor in English and American Literature

Minor in English Language Studies

M.A. in English: Concentration in Composition

M.A. in English: Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

M.A. in English: Concentration in Linguistics

M.A. in English: Concentration in Literature

Certificate in Teaching of Composition

Certificate in Teaching Post-Secondary Reading

Program Scope

The B.A. in English typically includes introductory course work in the study of language, the principles of critical investigation and critical writing, and the various methods of literary and/or language study. The requirements for each concentration are intended to make each student more familiar with one of the principal areas of English studies, and to show how other areas of English studies can illuminate his or her area of concentration.

The M.A. in English with Concentration in Composition addresses the need for professionalization of writing instruction, drawing on recent research into the composing process and into the unique characteristics of written English. The concentration emphasizes theory, research, and practice in the teaching of writing at advanced-secondary, community-college, and college levels. It builds upon a pioneering program designed to train teachers of composition at San Francisco State and provides professional preparation for writing teachers and supervisors, and a rigorous scholarly foundation for students preparing for doctoral work in composition or adult literacy.

The Master of Arts in English with Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages is offered as a result of a growing local, national, and international demand for persons prepared to perform various services in English as a foreign or second language. This concentration includes work in literature and foreign languages, with optional electives in education and the social sciences, as well as specialized work at an advanced level in linguistics and language teaching. The concentration provides training for teachers and a suitable background for supervisors and others responsible for the preparation of materials and courses of study in English as a foreign or second language. Completion of the Master of Arts with a concentration in TESOL may not fulfill the requirements for teacher credentialing in the State of California; some California credentials may require additional course work and/or examinations.

The M.A. in English with Concentration in Linguistics provides students with a solid grounding in the tools of language analysis. The course offerings in contemporary linguistic theory cover a broad spectrum of the levels of linguistic structure: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse analysis, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics. The program provides background for teachers of English at the secondary and community college levels, for other specialists in education, and for those who wish to pursue more advanced studies. Since the program allows considerable choice in course work beyond a basic set of core requirements, the student in consultation with an adviser can plan a program to suit individual interests and career requirements.

The M.A. in English with Concentration in Literature develops professional skills, ensures breadth of knowledge, and provides opportunities for specialization. Broader relationships are studied in the survey, period, and genre courses; narrower, deeper investigations are undertaken in the seminars. The thesis explores critical possibilities well beyond the range of the seminar paper. It measures the candidate's ability to isolate and thoroughly examine a particular literary problem, theme, or idea. An oral examination is preparation for the thesis.

The Certificate in the Teaching of Composition has been designed as a quick, economical means of attaining proficiency in the teaching of composition at senior high school, community college, college, and adult levels. It is aimed at both experienced and aspirant teachers who wish to study the practice of teaching composition without the theoretical and research background obtained in the M.A. in English: Concentration in Composition.

The Certificate in the Teaching of Post-Secondary Reading enables prospective and already practicing post-secondary teachers to attain proficiency in the teaching of reading at community college, college, and adult levels. New requirements for teaching reading in the community colleges (Assembly Bill 1725) specify that new instructors must possess a master's degree in education with a specialization in reading, or a master's in English or TESOL with additional certification in the teaching of reading.

Career Outlook

The English major can lead to a career in teaching as well as in other professional fields such as law, publishing, information science, and business.

Students completing the M.A. in Composition typically either go on to doctoral work with a view to teaching at a four-year institution or enter the community-college job market. At the university level, specialists in composition and rhetoric are in increasing demand as researchers and directors of undergraduate writing programs. Two-year colleges are increasingly recognizing the need for professional training in the teaching of composition and are hiring accordingly.

The Master of Arts with Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages prepares students specifically to teach English to non-native speakers of the language. Most graduates of the program become TESOL classroom teachers in adult education classes, public schools, intensive language programs, and colleges either in the United States or foreign countries. Others choose jobs in related areas such as program administration, curriculum design, materials writing, and teacher training.

The Master of Arts in Linguistics prepares students for a variety of teaching and research positions in which the emphasis is on the structure of language. Graduates of the program may teach English language or writing, work in the fields of speech production or speech recognition, or go on to further study in linguistics or related disciplines.

While the M.A. in Literature is specifically designed to prepare a student for a career in teaching literature in community colleges or high schools in the U.S. or overseas, it has a far broader application. Any career requiring communication, research or analytic skills, literacy, a careful scholarly approach and a broad understanding of human values may use this program as a base. Those include publishing, editing, media, journalism, technical writing, government service, law, and administrative or research work in business or industry.

The Certificate in the Teaching of Composition prepares students for teaching composition at the advanced secondary, community college, and college levels. Many students in M.A. programs other than composition take the certificate as a means of preparing themselves for teaching positions in two-year colleges, recognizing that other degree concentrations in English may not make them sufficiently marketable. In addition a number of two-year college and high school English teachers take the courses to develop their expertise in composition.

The Certificate in Teaching Post-Secondary Reading enables prospective and already practicing post-seconday teachers to develop their ability to meet specific individual professional needs in the area of basic literacy and reading instruction. This certificate prepares students for teaching positions in the community colleges and community agencies where specialized background and techniques are necessary.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH

General Information

Students who are considering teaching in the secondary schools should see a departmental credential adviser before planning their program. Specific courses and an assessment of competencies are required for admission to the Secondary Education Credential program. Students should also contact the Student Services Office in HSS 244, (4l5) 338-7038, regarding teaching credential information.

English majors are required to complete a 39-unit program consisting of fifteen (15) units of core requirements and additional requirements in an area of concentration.

English courses normally earn three units of credit. However, some courses which fulfill requirements for the major are variable unit courses and may earn four or five units. For further information on how to apply these additional units to completion of the major, see the elective unit section under each concentration, pick up a Literature Course Classification Guide (available in the English Department), and consult with your adviser.

The basic requirements for the B.A. in English can be met by completing any one of the following areas of concentration. Guidelines for the patterns of additional requirements for each concentration, including the Individual Major, are available in the department office. In addition students must take one critical writing course which includes an introduction to literature; typically this requirement will be met by students taking English 214 to fulfill university requirements. But for students not taking English 214, one of the following must be included on their program: English 418 or English 411 (foreign students only). English 50, 114, 214, 410/414 cannot be counted for credit in the major.

Nine units of work in lower division courses may be accepted for credit in the major upon consent of an adviser.

Courses for this discipline are listed in alphabetical sequence (consult Index for page reference).

Core Requirements

								Units
One upper division course in Shakespeare			3
ENG 480	Junior Seminar						3

One of the following courses in English literature before 1800:	3
ENG 501	Age of Chaucer
ENG 509	Age of Humanism
ENG 510	Age of Wit

One of the following courses in English/ 
American literature of the 19th century:			3
ENG 514	Age of Romantics
ENG 516	Age of Victorians
ENG 526	Age of American Renaissance

One course in an individual author				3
Concentration (see listings below)				24
Total for major							39

Concentration I: Literature

One course in language with approval of adviser			3
One course in theory or criticism				3
One course in English literature before 1800 
(apart from core Shakespeare requirement)			3
Courses selected with approval of adviser			15

 Concentration II: Language Studies

Four courses in language					12
ENG 421	Structure of English
ENG 422	History of English Language
ENG 424	Phonology and Morphology
ENG 425	Language in Context
Courses selected with approval of adviser			12

Concentration III: Individual Major

Students enrolling in the Individual Major Program will follow a 24-unit course of 
study worked out in continuous close consultation with an individual program 
adviser. Each course of study is adapted to the background and interests of the 
student. The Individual Major is available to students who can define a course of 
study in a serious and coherent way. Interested students apply with the English 
Department advising coordinator.				24

MINOR IN ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE

								Units
One of the following courses in lower division literature:	3
ENG 150	The Study of Literature
ENG 152	The Novel in English
ENG 154	Masterworks of Literature
ENG 155	Contemporary Literature
ENG 158	American Literature
ENG 159	Beginning Shakespeare

One of the following courses in Language:			3
ENG 420	Introduction to the Study of Language
ENG 421	The Structure of English
ENG 422	History of the English Language
ENG 424	Phonology and Morphology
ENG 425	Language in Context
ENG 429	Stylistics

One upper division course in Shakespeare			3
One upper division course in pre-1800 literature		3
Three upper division literature courses (electives)		9

Total for minor							21

MINOR IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDIES

ENG 421		The Structure of English				3
ENG 424		Phonology and Morphology				3
ENG 425		Language in Context					3

Three units selected from the following:ENG 420, 422, 426, 429, 651	3
Six units in Literature, three of which must be from the following:	6
ENG 150		The Study of Literature
ENG 152		The Novel in English
ENG 154		Masterworks of Literature
ENG 155		Contemporary Literature
ENG 158		American Literature
ENG 159		Beginning Shakespeare

One upper division course in Shakespeare				3
Total									21

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN ENGLISH

Advising is central to the program. Students must see their advisers to shape their programs initially, to gain approval for course choices, and to prepare for the oral examination. Please contact the graduate secretary, English, for more detailed advising information.

All M.A. candidates who wish to receive the Single Subject Teaching Credential concurrently with the M.A. should confer with an appropriate adviser in the College of Education.

Courses for these programs are listed in alphabetical sequence (consult Index for page reference).

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH: CONCENTRATION IN COMPOSITION

Admission to Program

Applicants should have an undergraduate major in English. Applicants without an undergraduate major in English may be admitted conditionally but must complete during the first semester of residence twelve units (upper division or graduate) of British and/or American literature, including a course in Shakespeare, before filing the Graduate Approved Program. ENG 657 is a prerequisite to all courses in the program except ENG 700, 706, and 800.

It is expected that a student completing this program is able to write prose publishable in academic journals.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: satisfactory performance in ENG 657. Level Two: satisfactory completion of ENG 890.

Program

									Units
ENG 700		Introduction to Composition Theory			3
ENG 704		Seminar in the Teaching of Writing 			3
ENG 706		Seminar in Sociolinguistics of Composition		3
ENG 716		Projects in the Teaching of Writing 			3
ENG 890		Seminar in Research in Composition			3
ENG 892		Integrative Seminar in Composition Studies		3

Units to be taken with the approval of an adviser
from the following:							12
ENG 429		Stylistics
ENG 555		Short Story
ENG 635		Coming of Age in America
ENG 701		Theoretical Backgrounds in Com-
		munity College and College Reading Instruction
ENG 702		Reading-Writing Connections
ENG 705		Seminar in Basic/Remedial Writing
ENG 707		Current Issues in Composition
ENG 708		Computers and the Teaching of Writing
ENG 715		Projects in the Teaching of Reading
ENG 717		Projects in Teaching Literature
ENG 718		Supervision of Teaching Experience
ENG 651		Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
ENG 730		Introduction to Graduate Study: TESOL
ENG 800		Special Topics in the Study of Composition and Reading
ENG 815		Research Topics in Post-Secondary Reading
ENG 896		Projects in Composition Research
or other approved courses within or outside the English Department
Minimum total								30
and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations

Master's Examinations. Failure of these examinations does not disqualify the candidate unless the examining committee so directs. The candidate may take the examinations twice, and if failing both times, will be disqualified from the graduate program.

NOTE: Prerequisite to ENG 704 is ENG 657, passed with a grade of B or better; prerequisite to ENG 716 is ENG 704, passed with a grade of B or better; prerequisite to ENG 890 is ENG 700.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH: CONCENTRATION IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES

Admission to Program

Prerequisites: In order to be fully classified, students must meet the conditions below:

English 421 and 424 may be taken concurrently with English 730. All other linguistics/language studies courses must be completed prior to English 730. All linguistics/language studies courses must be taken for a letter grade, and students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA in these courses to continue in the program. Literature courses may be taken for a letter grade or credit if the courses selected permit the grading option desired.

Students whose native language is not English and whose education was outside the United States must present evidence of a TOEFL score of 570 or higher. Students applying from other countries are accepted only for the Fall semester.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: both native and non-native speakers of English must take the Graduate Essay Test (GET). This test is given one or two weeks prior to the beginning of classes each semester. (Consult the Testing Center about dates and fee.) Admission to ENG 730 (and subsequent core courses) and Group I seminars requires a pass on the GET or successful completion of the appropriate composition courses. Level Two: satisfactory performance in ENG 891.

Core Courses (18 units)

The core courses listed below are required of all students graduating from this program.

									Units
ENG 653		TESOL: Pedagogical Grammar				3
ENG 730		Introduction to Graduate Study of TESOL			3
ENG 731		Seminar: TESOL Listening and Speaking Skills		3
ENG 732		Seminar: TESOL Reading and Writing Skills		3
ENG 733		Student Teaching in Teaching English to Speakers of
		Other Languages						3
ENG 891		Integrative Seminar in Teaching English to Speakers
		of Other Languages					3

Group Courses (12 units)

Upper division or graduate courses selected with adviser's
approval from subjects in 
each of Groups I, II, III, and IV (see below)				12
Minimum total								30
and Master's Comprehensive Examinations or 
Master's Thesis (see below)

Group I: Advanced Seminar in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3 units)

ENG 720		Seminar in Language, Literature,and Culture: TESOL
ENG 722		Seminar in Language Assessment
ENG 724		Special Topics in TESOL
ENG 728		Seminar in Sociolinguistics
ENG 729		Seminar in Psycholinguistics

Group II: Linguistic Theory (3 units)

ENG 719 Seminar: Contemporary Semantic Theory ENG 723 Seminar in the Structure of English ENG 725 Special Topics in Linguistics

Group III: Related Courses--Education/Psychology/Social Science (3 units)

Related courses (with written approval of adviser) including anthropology, educational theory, ethnic studies, history, international relations, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics. ENG 726 is required for students with fewer than two years TESOL teaching experience.

Group IV: Related Courses--Humanities (3 units)

Related courses (with written approval of adviser) including communication theory, composition theory, creative writing, ethnic studies, foreign language, linguistics, literature, speech science. (ENG 898, Master's Thesis, is acceptable in this group.)

Master's Examinations. The oral and written comprehensive examinations test the ability of students to integrate the knowledge and experience they have acquired in this field. The examinations are on the content areas covered in the program, with an emphasis on methodological facets of TESOL. The candidate may take the examinations twice and, if failing both times, will be disqualified from the graduate program.

Upon recommendation of the adviser and consent of the graduate coordinator, a student can write a master's thesis in lieu of taking the comprehensive examinations.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH: CONCENTRATION IN LINGUISTICS

Admission to Program

Prerequisites: In order to be fully classified, students must have already taken the equivalents or take at SFSU the following:

All linguistics/language studies courses must be taken for a letter grade, and students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA in these courses to continue in the program.

Students whose native language is not English and whose education was outside the United States must present evidence of a TOEFL score of 570 or higher. The ESLPT will no longer be required for non-native speakers. Foreign students applying from abroad are accepted only for the Fall semester.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: both native and non-native speakers of English must take the Graduate Essay Test (GET). This test is given one or two weeks prior to the beginning of classes each semester. (Consult the Testing Center about dates and fee.) Admission to ENG 719 (and other core courses) requires a pass on the GET or successful completion of the appropriate composition courses. Level Two: satisfactory performance in either the M.A. thesis or in ENG 899.

Required core courses

									Units
ENG 719		Seminar: Contemporary Semantic Theory			3
ENG 729		Seminar in Psycholinguistics				3
ENG 728		Seminar in Sociolinguistics				3
ENG 723		Seminar in the Structure of English			3
Total for core								12

Related Courses (15 units)

Units to be taken from one or more of the following groups of related courses or 
other courses approved by an adviser. At least two courses must be linguistics 
courses. All must be selected with approval of adviser.			15
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
ENG 651		Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages: Basic Principles
ENG 653		TESOL: Pedagogical Grammar
ENG 720		Seminar in Language, Literature, and Culture: TESOL
ENG 726		Practicum in TESOL
ENG 730		Introduction to Graduate Study: TESOL
ENG 731		Seminar: TESOL Listening and Speaking Skills
ENG 732		Seminar: TESOL Reading and Writing Skills
Linguistics
ENG 422		History of the English Language
ENG 724		Special Topics in TESOL (1-3)
ENG 725		Special Topics in Linguistics
ANTH 500	Descriptive Linguistics
PHIL 830	Seminar in the Philosophy of Language
Special Topics in Linguistics
ENG 722 Seminar in Language Assessment ENG 724 Special Topics in TESOL (1-3) ENG 725 Special Topics in Linguistics
Speech and Communication Studies
SPCH 503	Sex Roles and Communication (4)
SPCH 541	Intercultural Communication (4)
SPCH 750	Seminar in Communication and Culture (4)
Reading and Writing
ENG 654		Tutoring in Reading
ENG 656		Topics in Reading in the Secondary School (1-3)
ENG 657		Grammar and Rhetoric of the Sentence
ENG 658		Projects in Study and Reading Techniques
ENG 704		Introduction to Teaching of Writing
ENG 715		Projects in the Teaching of Reading
ENG 716		Projects in the Teaching of Writing
Literature
ENG 429		Stylistics
ENG 655		Literature and the Adolescent Reader
ENG 720		Seminar in Language, Literature, and Culture: TESOL
ENG 782		Seminar in Chaucer

One of the following							3
ENG 898		Master's Thesis or
ENG 899		Special Study and
		Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations
Minimum total								30
and Foreign Language Requirement (see below)

Master's Examinations. Failure in these examinations does not disqualify the candidate unless the examining committee so directs. The candidate may take the examinations twice, and, if failure occurs both times, will be disqualified from the graduate program.

Foreign Language Requirement. Ten semester units, or the equivalent, of a modern European language, plus a minimum of one semester or the equivalent of a non-Indo-European language, concurrent with ENG 426, is required of all candidates for the Master of Arts in English with Concentration in Linguistics. The student has the alternative of satisfying the foreign language requirement by examination. Units earned in foreign language study are not to be included in the student's Graduate Approved Program.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH: CONCENTRATION IN LITERATURE

Admission to Program

Applicants must meet general university requirements as stated in this Bulletin.

In addition to the materials sent to the Office of Admissions, the applicant must submit the following items to the English Department in order to be considered for admission: (1) English Department application; (2) at least two letters of recommendation; (3) one official set of transcripts; (4) writing sample (five page critical essay). Contact the graduate program assistant for the department application and department deadlines.

Applicants who meet the following requirements are eligible for admission to classified standing: completion of an undergraduate English literature major, comparable to the major program at this university, and achievement of a GPA of at least 3.0 in the major.

Applicants who do not meet the above requirements may be accepted conditionally and can achieve classified status as follows:

Denial. Applications that do not permit admission under the above rules must be denied unless the Graduate Literature Curriculum Committee makes an exception.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: satisfactory performance on papers in ENG 741. Level Two: satisfactory completion of the M.A. thesis.

Program

The program consists of ten courses (minimum 30 units) of which seven courses (minimum 21 units) must be graduate level courses. Of these graduate courses, six (18 units) must be English Department courses, of which nine (9) units must be seminars from the 742-790 range. Students may choose either an emphasis in General Studies or Special Studies. See guidelines for each emphasis after the Program Requirements.

NOTE: English courses usually earn three (3) units of credit; however, some upper division courses which fulfill requirements for the M.A. in Literature may be offered for three (3) to five (5) units.

Program Requirements

									Units
ENG 741		Theory of Literature					3
ENG 742-790	Graduate Seminars					9
Graduate level courses							6
Electives on advisement							9
ENG 898	Master's Thesis							3
Minimum total								30
and Master's Oral Examination
NOTE: ENG 704, 705, 715, and 716 may not be included among the electives. Courses from other related departments (up to six units with approval of adviser) may be included.

General Studies Emphasis

The course units below are not in addition to the minimum 30 units above. Program Requirement courses such as ENG 742-790, Graduate Level Courses, and Electives may be double-counted as meeting period, author, genre, or theory course requirements.

Courses selected with approval of adviser as follows:
Early Period Requirement						6
Period Emphasis								6
Genre course in the period of emphasis					3
Individual Author course from the period of emphasis			3

Theory and Criticism course, selected from 
the following or other courses on advisement:				3
ENG 429		Stylistics
ENG 600		Theory of Literature
ENG 601		Literature and Psychology
ENG 602		Literature and Society
ENG 603		Literature and the History of Ideas
ENG 611		Modern Criticism
ENG 613		Feminist Literary Criticism
ENG 615		Imagery, Metaphor, and Symbol
ENG 742		Seminar: Studies in Criticism
ENG 743		Seminar: Studies in Principles of Literary Form
ENG 744		Seminar: Literature and Psychology
ENG 746		Seminar: Modern Criticism
ENG 747		Feminist Criticisms

Early Period Requirement. Six of the 30 units in the General Studies Emphasis must be chosen from courses in literature before 1800. The early period requirement may be met by courses that also fulfill the above listed program requirements (for example, early period courses might also fulfill author, period, genre, seminar, graduate level, elective, or theory and criticism required courses). Thus, the early period requirement is a distribution requirement, not a course requirement.

Special Studies Emphasis

The special studies emphasis is available to students whose proposed fields of study (for example, cultural criticism or reader response approaches to literature) do not fall readily within the period, genre, or author rubric of the general studies emphasis. Students who wish to focus on special studies must define their course of study in a written proposal submitted early in their graduate career and before completing four of the required ten courses. The proposal must be approved and signed by a graduate adviser and by the English Department's graduate literature program coordinator.

The number of courses and seminars, graduate level courses, and electives selected individually by the student and proposed for the Special Studies emphasis must conform to the Program Requirements (see above).

Culminating Experience

Master's Thesis, Prospectus, and Oral Examination required for the General Studies and Special Studies Emphases. The prospectus and the oral are scheduled before a student begins writing the thesis. The prospectus is a written statement, usually including the controlling purpose of the thesis; the selection of literary materials; the relevant scholarship and criticism; and the value and interest of the study. The oral is a one-hour examination on the prospectus conducted by the two thesis readers.

A candidate who has failed the oral examination may not take it again before the next regular semester. A candidate who failed the examination twice will not be permitted to continue in the program for the M.A. in Literature. Consult The Prospectus and the Thesis handout available in the English Office for more information.

CERTIFICATE IN THE TEACHING OF COMPOSITION

Admission to Program

Every graduate student in English is invited to complete a twelve-unit sequence designated as the Certificate in the Teaching of Composition. For M.A. in Literature candidates, this sequence is separate from the 30-unit literature requirement. Unclassified graduate students and candidates for degrees in other departments may be accepted into the program with the approval of the English Department.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: the writing proficiency of students is monitored in ENG 657. Level Two: satisfactory completion of ENG 704 and ENG 716.

Program

									Units
ENG 657	Grammar and Rhetoric of the Sentence				3
ENG 704	Introduction to the Teaching of Writing				3
ENG 716	Projects in the Teaching of Writing				3

Select one of the following:						3
ENG 429	Stylistics
ENG 656	Topics in Reading in the Secondary School
ENG 658	Projects in Study and Reading Techniques
ENG 700	Introduction to Graduate Study in Composition
ENG 701	Theoretical Backgrounds in Community College and College Reading Instruction
ENG 702	Reading/Writing Connections
ENG 705	Seminar in Teaching Basic/Remedial Writing
ENG 706	Seminar in Sociolinguistics of Composition
ENG 707	Current Issues in Composition
ENG 708	Computers and the Teaching of Writing
ENG 715	Projects in the Teaching of Reading
ENG 717	Projects in the Teaching of Literature
ENG 718	Supervision of Teaching Experience
ENG 732	Seminar: TESOL Reading and Writing Skills
ENG 800	Special Topics in the Study of Composition and Reading
Total for program							12
NOTE: Students may enroll in any of the courses listed above, even if they do not wish to complete the sequence. ENG 657 is prerequisite to ENG 704 and 705. ENG 704 is prerequisite to ENG 716. Courses applied to the certificate may not be taken CR/NC and a grade of A or B must be earned in each.

The certificate program is coordinated by the director of composition, the department chair, and the dean of the Graduate Division. For more information, contact the secretary, Composition Office (338-2128).

CERTIFICATE IN TEACHING POSTSECONDARY READING

Admission to the Program

This twelve-unit program is open to all graduate students in English. For M.A. in Literature candidates, the sequence of courses is separate from the 30-unit Literature requirement. Unclassified graduate students and candidates for degrees in other departments may be accepted into the program with approval of the English Department. Candidates pursuing the Certificate or M.A. in the Teaching of Composition may concurrently complete the requirement for the Certificate in Post-Secondary Reading.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: the writing proficiency of students is monitored through evaluation of written assignments in ENG 701 and 715. Level Two: satisfactory completion of written assignments in ENG 800.

Satisfactory completion of ENG 657 is prerequisite to many of the courses in this certificate. Check the Announcement of Courses section for all prerequisites. ISED 606 meets the requirement for the Preliminary Designated Subjects Credential in Adult Education.

Program

									Units
ENG 701		Theoretical Backgrounds in Com-
		munity College and College Reading Instruction		3
ENG 702		Reading/Writing Connections				3
ENG 715		Projects in the Teaching of Reading			3

Select one of the following:						3
ENG 653		Pedagogical Grammar
ENG 656		Reading Theory and Methods
ENG 657		Grammar and Rhetoric of the Sentence
ENG 704		Introduction to the Teaching of Writing
ENG 705		Seminar in Teaching Developmental Writing
ENG 706		Sociolinguistics of Composition
ENG 717		Projects in the Teaching of Literature
ENG 728		Seminar in Sociolinguistics
ENG 729		Seminar: Psycholinguistics
ENG 732		Seminar: TESOL Reading and Writing Skills
ISED 606	Seminar in Principles and Methods of Adult Education
ISED 891	Adult Literacy and Basic Education
Total for certificate							12



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