Chemistry and Biochemistry


College of Science and Engineering
Dean: James C. Kelley

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
TH 806
415-338-1288
Chair: Daniel Buttlaire

Undergraduate Adviser: J. Z. Krevor
Graduate Coordinator: J. R. Keeffe

Faculty

Professors--Aragon, Buttlaire, Eden, Erden, Keeffe, Krevor, Lindquist, Luckey, Macher, Orenberg, Plachy

Associate Professors--Gronert, Trautman

Assistant Professors--DeWitt, Palmer, Simonis, Wu

Adjunct Professors--Banin, Dreyer, Roitman

Programs

B.A. in Chemistry

B.S. in Biochemistry

B.S. in Chemistry

Minor in Chemistry

M.S. in Chemistry

M.S. in Chemistry: Concentration in Biochemistry

Program Scope and Career Outlook

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers an outstanding educational environment for undergraduate and graduate students. The department's degree programs are designed to prepare students for graduate study; health professions programs, such as medicine; and professional careers, such as teaching and laboratory positions with biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. An important objective is to educate versatile chemists and biochemists who understand the theoretical basis and practical applications of their discipline and are well prepared to succeed in graduate school and professional positions.

The Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry is particularly well-suited for those students whose career goals involve the integration of chemistry with other fields. This program provides excellent preparation for pre-medical students and high school science teachers, as well as those who will pursue further studies in the pharmaceutical sciences, veterinary medicine, and dentistry. Additionally, the B.A. in Chemistry may be combined with a minor in engineering, business, social sciences, the humanities, or the arts to provide the student with a unique synthesis of experience applicable to careers in patent law, management, sales, marketing, chemical engineering, regulatory affairs, technical writing, scientific journalism, library science, environmental protection, and art restoration.

The Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry is designed for those students who wish to be particularly well qualified in the rapidly expanding fields between biology and chemistry. This strong laboratory training program provides exceptional preparation for careers in biotechnology and enjoys a favorable reputation among biotechnology companies in the Bay Area. This degree provides a strong foundation for a graduate degree in biochemistry, and it is an excellent degree choice for entry into medical or dental college.

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, which is approved by the American Chemical Society, prepares the student to pursue a career in chemically-oriented industry or to begin graduate study in chemistry and other molecular sciences. The degree provides a solid foundation in mathematics and physics, breadth in traditional chemical subdisciplines (analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry), and depth in one or more areas of chemistry. This program provides excellent training in instrumental analysis and emphasizes quantitative and analytical aspects of the discipline.

The Master of Science in Chemistry, which has been approved by the American Chemical Society, is designed as a balanced program in analytical, inorganic, organic, physical, and biochemistry. The department also offers the Master of Science in Chemistry with a Concentration in Biochemistry for students who want to specialize in the biochemical aspects of chemistry. The American Chemical Society placement examinations, while not greatly influencing the graduate status of the student, will determine where individual weaknesses exist so that corrective emphasis may be applied. The department also offers a cooperative M.S./Ph.D. program with the University of California, Davis for defined minority students and women from all ethnic groups (contact the department chair for further information). Work leading to the master's degree should provide for the best possible balance between theoretical course work and research. A student completing the program should be prepared to pursue a career in the field of chemical research and development at the technical level, teaching, or have the necessary foundation to continue studies toward the doctorate.

The Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society enthusiastically commended the department for the excellence of its undergraduate program. High-quality teaching, one-on-one advising, and opportunities for students to participate in research under the direct supervision of active faculty members who are recognized authorities in their field are significant features of the department. Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty members are actively involved in research, and many undergraduate students work on research projects during their senior year, working closely with their faculty research adviser. Examples of research projects currently under investigation by our faculty members and their research students include:

Analytical Chemistry: Evaluation of Martian soil analog materials. Development and applications of new methods of mass spectrometry.

Biochemistry: Enzyme reaction mechanisms. Synthesis of enzyme inhibitors, including boronic acid peptide transition-state analogs, and enzyme-inhibitor interactions. Isolation and characterization of methyl transferase enzymes. Structure-function relationships in membrane transport proteins, including Lamb and heat shock proteins, and mechanisms of membrane biogenesis. Biosynthesis and regulation of the expression of complex carbohydrate cell surface antigens.

Environmental Chemistry: Mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance/accumulation in higher plant systems. Movement of heavy metals from the environment into the biosphere. Characterization of the atmosphere on the Russian Space Station Mir. Detection of trace levels of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Monitoring terpene emissions in forest-based ecosystems. Atmospheric degradation pathways of alkanes.

Inorganic Chemistry: Synthesis and characterization of new soluble transition metal organometallic complexes that model active sites of heterogeneous catalysts and biological molecules that are known to assist in the oxidation of alkanes. Solution structures of biologically relevant paramagnetic Fe(III) porphyrin, zinc and organocobalt complexes, which mimic the active sites of important heme proteins, zinc enzymes and vitamin B12. Development and applications of multi-dimensional NMR methodology for structural analysis of paramagnetic molecules. Photochemistry and photophysics of organometallic compounds.

Organic Chemistry: Reaction mechanisms and synthetic applications of organic peroxides. Small rings. Heterocyclic chemistry. Chemistry of singlet oxygen. Mechanisms of fundamental organic reactions: computational approaches to modeling the transition states of nucleophilic substitutions and elimination reactions. Conformations of small peptides. Structure-reactivity relationships in acid- and base-catalyzed organic reactions, including heterolytic cleavage of C-H and C-C bonds. Design and synthesis of sub-strate analogs to elucidate the catalytic mechanisms of orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase and inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

Physical Chemistry: Characterization of structural features and dynamic behavior of natural and synthetic macromolecules in solution using physical methods and theoretical models. Electrical and mechanical properties of nucleic acids, proteins, including molecular motors, and protein-nucleic acid complexes. Biophysical applications of electron spin resonance spin labels. Diffusion and solubility of molecular oxygen in biomembranes and in other tissue.

Students obtain extensive hands-on experience with a wide array of state-of-the-art research instruments, and they obtain valuable training in modern laboratory techniques and computational methods. These include, for example, excellent nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, which are used to study molecular structure and dynamics, as well as numerous modern biochemical instruments used to study biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. Computers are used extensively in chemistry classes, and the department's modern facilities include a computational chemistry and visualization laboratory. This laboratory houses state-of-the-art computer workstations with 3D graphics capabilities and enables us to teach molecular modeling applications and computational chemistry in inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry undergraduate lecture and laboratory courses. The advanced capabilities of this computer laboratory places the department at the forefront in the use of innovative methods to teach chemistry to undergraduate students.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS IN CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

High school preparation for these programs should include two years of algebra, one year of geometry, one-half year of trigonometry, one year of chemistry, and one year of physics.

It is suggested that students plan the program of courses in the major with the help of the adviser in order that the correct sequence of courses be taken. Otherwise, unnecessary delays may occur in the completion of the program. It is also suggested that students in these programs consult with the adviser before selecting courses to meet General Education requirements. Students who are considering teaching chemistry should see a credential adviser in the Chemistry Department before planning the major. Specific courses and a competency assessment are required for admission to the credential program.

All courses used in the major program except CHEM 694 must be completed with letter grades. CR/NC may be used only for CHEM 694.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY

Units

Lower Division Requirements

CHEM 111	General Chemistry I					5
CHEM 113/114	 General Chemistry II and Laboratory (3/2)		5
One of the following sets:						8-12
PHYS 111/112	General Physics I (3/1) and
PHYS 121/122	General Physics II (3/1) or
PHYS 220/222	General Physics with Calculus I and Laboratory (3/1) and
PHYS 230/232	General Physics with Calculus II and Laboratory (3/1) and
PHYS 240/242	General Physics with Calculus III and Laboratory (3/1)
MATH 220/221	Calculus and Analytic Geometry I/II (3 each)		6
Total lower division requirements					24-28

Upper Division Requirements

CHEM 300	General Physical Chemistry I				2
CHEM 301	General Physical Chemistry II				2
CHEM 320	Modern Methods of Quantitative Chemical Analysis	4
CHEM 333	Organic Chemistry I					3
CHEM 334	Organic Chemistry I Laboratory				2
CHEM 335	Organic Chemistry II					3
CHEM 336	Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 
[CHEM 338 may be substituted for CHEM 336]				3
CHEM 452	Integrated Laboratory I					4

Upper division chemistry electives, including one of the following:	4
CHEM 343	Biochemistry I Laboratory
CHEM 348	Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
CHEM 432	Advanced Organic Laboratory (4)
CHEM 453	Integrated Laboratory II
CHEM 470	Research
Total upper division requirements					27
Total for major								51-55

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY

Students are required to complete 130 units to meet the requirements for the B.S. in Chemistry.

Units

Lower Division Requirements

CHEM 111	General Chemistry I						5
CHEM 113/114	 General Chemistry II and Laboratory (3/2)			5
MATH 220/223	 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I-IV (3 each)			12
PHYS 220/222	General Physics with Calculus I and Laboratory (3/1)		4
PHYS 230/232	General Physics with Calculus II and Laboratory (3/1)		4
PHYS 240/242	General Physics with Calculus III and Laboratory (3/1)		4
Total lower division requirements						34

Upper Division Requirements

CHEM 320	Modern Methods of Quantitative Chemical Analysis	4
CHEM 333	Organic Chemistry I					3
CHEM 334	Organic Chemistry I Laboratory				2
CHEM 335	Organic Chemistry II					3
CHEM 336	Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 
		[CHEM 338 may be substituted for CHEM 336]		3
CHEM 351	Physical Chemistry I					3
CHEM 353	Physical Chemistry II					3
CHEM 425	Inorganic Chemistry					3
CHEM 452	Integrated Laboratory I					4
CHEM 453	Integrated Laboratory II				3

Electives, including at least two units of laboratory, on advisement from the following list 
(other upper division and graduate courses that have a physical chemistry prerequisite 
can also be elected, with consent of an adviser):			8
CHEM 340	Biochemistry I
CHEM 341	Biochemistry II
CHEM 343	Biochemistry I Laboratory
CHEM 347	Clinical Biochemistry (2)
CHEM 348	Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
CHEM 423	Chemical Instrumentation
CHEM 432	Advanced Organic Laboratory (4)
CHEM 433	Advanced Organic Chemistry
CHEM 470	Research (May be repeated once for a maximum of six units) 
		[Strongly recommended for students preparing for graduate college
		and professional positions]
CHEM 694	Cooperative Education in Chemistry (1) [maximum of two
		units with approval]
CHEM 825	Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 831	Theoretical Organic Chemistry
CHEM 834	Organic Spectroscopic Methods
CHEM 841	Enzymology
CHEM 850	Valency and Spectroscopy
PHYS 320	Modern Physics I
PHYS 321	Modern Physics Laboratory (1)
Total upper division requirements					39
Total for major								73

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOCHEMISTRY

Department advisers should be consulted about strengthening professional aspects of this degree. Research (CHEM 470) is strongly recommended for students preparing for graduate school and professional positions.

PHYS 220, 222, 230, 232, 240, and 242 may be substituted for PHYS 111 and 121. CHEM 351 and 353 may be substituted for CHEM 300 and 301.

Units

Lower Division Requirements

CHEM 111	General Chemistry I					5
CHEM 113/114	 General Chemistry II and Laboratory (3/2)		5
PHYS 111/112	General Physics I (3/1)					4
PHYS 121/122	General Physics II (3/1)				4
MATH 220/222	 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I-III (3 each)		9
BIOL 230	Introductory Biology I					5
Total lower division requirements					32



Upper Division Requirements

CHEM 300	General Physical Chemistry I				2
CHEM 301	General Physical Chemistry II				2
CHEM 320	Modern Methods of Quantitative Chemical Analysis	4
CHEM 333	Organic Chemistry I					3
CHEM 334	Organic Chemistry I Laboratory				2
CHEM 335	Organic Chemistry II					3
CHEM 336	Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 	
[CHEM 338 may be substituted for CHEM 336]				3
CHEM 340	Biochemistry I						3
CHEM 341	Biochemistry II						3
CHEM 343	Biochemistry I Laboratory				3
CHEM 452	Integrated Laboratory I					4
Total upper division requirements					32
Biochemistry or Biology Option (see below)				8-10
Total for major								72-74
Biochemistry Option (8 units)
Electives from the following (must include at
least two units of laboratory course work):				8
CHEM 347	Clinical Biochemistry (2)
CHEM 470	Research (Biochemistry related 
		research with prior consent of Biochemistry adviser)
CHEM 640	Advanced Topics in Biochemistry (1-3) [may be repeated for 
		a maximum of four units for different topics]
CHEM 694	Cooperative Education in 
		Chemistry (1) [maximum of two units with approval; biochemistry 
		related research with prior consent of Biochemistry adviser]
CHEM 699	Special Study in Chemistry (1) 
		[maximum of one unit with approval; biochemistry related 
		research with prior consent of Biochemistry adviser]
Biology Option (8-10 units)
BIOL 240	Introductory Biology II					5

Electives from the following:						3-5
BIOL 350	Cell Biology
BIOL 351	Experiments in Cell Biology and Genetics (4)
BIOL 355	Genetics
BIOL 401	General Microbiology
BIOL 402	General Microbiology Laboratory (2)
BIOL 525	Plant Physiology
BIOL 526	Plant Physiology Laboratory (2)
BIOL 612	Human Physiology
BIOL 613	Human Physiology Laboratory (2)

MINOR PROGRAM IN CHEMISTRY

Twenty-four units of chemistry are required, including CHEM 111, 113, and 114, or their equivalents. Twelve of these units, including four upper-division units, must be taken at San Francisco State University. Twelve of the twenty-four units must be upper division. Eight of the twenty-four units must correspond to upper-division courses at San Francisco State University. Clinical Science majors who elect CHEM 334 usually meet all these requirements; they should consult a chemistry adviser regarding the Chemistry Minor.

The following courses, or their equivalents, cannot be counted toward the minor: CHEM 100, 101, 102, 105, 106, 361, 599, and 694.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

Admission to Program

Students must meet these criteria:

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: newly admitted students are required to take the Graduate Essay Test (GET) (administered by the Testing Office) preferably before the first enrollment takes place, but no later than the end of the first semester of enrollment, to determine if writing deficiencies exist. If remedial work is necessary, the student shall be expected to complete prescribed course(s) in English. Level Two: later in the process of completing the master's degree, the student is expected to demonstrate an advanced level of proficiency in written and spoken English by successfully completing both CHEM 880 and a thesis.

Advancement to Candidacy

In order to be advanced to candidacy, students must:

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY

For general information for all Chemistry graduate students, see Graduate Programs in Chemistry and Biochemistry above.

							Units

CHEM 834 Organic Spectroscopic Methods 3 One of the following courses selected on advisement of graduate major adviser: 3 CHEM 850 Valency and Spectroscopy CHEM 851 Biochemical Spectroscopy CHEM 880 Seminar 3 Other Requirements CHEM 897 Research 6 (After initiating a research project, a graduate student must enroll each semester in CHEM 897 while actively engaged in research for the M.S. degree. A maximum of six units of CHEM 897 may be included on the Graduate Approved Program.) CHEM 898 Master's Thesis 3

Related Study

Upper division or graduate courses in chemistry, 
physics, mathematics, or biology on advisement of
graduate major adviser							12
Minimum total								30
and Oral Defense of Thesis

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY: CONCENTRATION IN BIOCHEMISTRY

For general information for all Chemistry graduate students, see Graduate Programs in Chemistry and Biochemistry above.

						Units

CHEM 834 Organic Spectroscopic Methods 3 One of the following courses selected on advisement of graduate major adviser: 3 CHEM 850 Valency and Spectroscopy CHEM 851 Biochemical Spectroscopy CHEM 880 Seminar 3

Other Requirements

Courses in biochemistry selected from the following:			6
CHEM 841	Enzymology
CHEM 843	Membrane Biochemistry
CHEM 844	Bioinorganic Chemistry
CHEM 845	Glycoconjugate Biochemistry
Upper division or graduate courses in chemistry, physics,
mathematics, or biology on advisement of graduate major
adviser. (May include courses listed above which have
not been taken to satisfy either the core 
requirement or the six-unit biochemistry requirement.)			6
CHEM 897	Research						6
(After initiating a research project, a graduate student must
enroll each semester in CHEM 897 while actively engaged in research
for the M.S. degree. A maximum of six units of CHEM 897 may be
included on the Graduate Approved Program.)
CHEM 898	Master's Thesis						3
Minimum total								30
and Oral Defense of Thesis



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