Bulletin--Special Education-2

Academic Programs: Special Education (Continued)


MASTER OF ARTS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Graduate Advisers—All tenured/tenure-track faculty serve as graduate advisers with a coordinator assigned to each program area as follows: A. Schuler and A. Watanabe, Learning Disabilities; L. Goetz, Severe Disabilities; S. Mangold, Visually Impaired (Blind and Low Vision and Orientation and Mobility); S. Rosen, Physical Disabilities; B. Franklin, Deaf and Hearing Impaired; S. Lamb, Communicative Disorders; L. Cain, Joint Doctoral Coordinator; M. Hanson, Early Childhood Special Education.

Admission to Program
Students desiring to enter graduate level programs in Special Education must complete a department application and apply to the university, if not already enrolled. The department application requests background information, transcripts, and three letters of reference. A minimum of a 2.5 GPA is required for credentials, and a 3.0 GPA is required for master's degrees. See specialization areas for unique admission criteria.

Upon acceptance into the program, students are assigned an adviser. All students must see their advisers before registration.

Written English Proficiency Requirement
Level One: graduate candidates must submit evidence that they have passed the GET (Graduate Essay Test). This examination is offered at the immediate start-up of each semester. New students are expected to take the examination their first semester. If the student fails, s/he may take the examination a second time or enroll in a remedial course, EDUC 614. If students elect not to take the course until they have attempted to pass the examination a second time, it is their choice. However, students who have failed the GET twice must enroll in the remedial course to fulfill the requirement. Completion of this course constitutes completion of the requirement. This course is not a substitute for the GET unless the student has failed the test at least once. Level Two: is measured by successful completion of the master's written comprehensive examination or completion of a field study or a thesis. Satisfactory completion automatically certifies that the second level writing requirement has been met.

Courses for this discipline are listed in alphabetical sequence (see Special Education discipline in the Announcement of Courses section). Upper division courses offered by the department may be considered upon approval of the graduate adviser.

Program						Units
ISED 797	Seminar in Educational Research	    3
SPED 788	Public Policy and Legal Rights 
		of Persons with Disability	    3
One of the following selected on advisement	    3
	SPED 801	Diversity in Special 
			Education: Family Sys-
			tems, Resources, and 
			Culture
	SPED 779	Family Systems and Ser-
			vices for Young Disabled 
			Children
Upper division or graduate courses in special 
	education, as required by each graduate 
	program					   12
Related studies (selected upon approval of 
	graduate major adviser in specialization 
	emphasis)				    6
One of the following options (by advisement and 
	approval of major graduate adviser in 
	specialization emphasis):		  3-6
Option I:*
SPED 895	Field Study or
	SPED 898	Master's Thesis and 
			Oral Defense of Thesis
Option II:
SPED 881	Advanced Research Seminar in 
		Special Education and
Master's Comprehensive Written Examination
Option III:
Two elective graduate seminars which will 
	reflect critical analysis of literature 
	and application of research skills (by 
	advisement and approval of graduate 
	major adviser) and
Master's Comprehensive Written Examination
		Minimum total			30-33
*Students in severe disabilities program emphasis are required to take the Master's Comprehensive Written Examination, as well as either SPED 895 or SPED 898.

CERTIFICATE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION

Admission to the Program
To be admitted students must meet the standards required for candidates for a master's degree program in Special Education. To apply students must hold a 2.5 minimum grade point average and submit three letters of recommendation, transcripts of all college or university level training, and a position statement documenting why they are pursuing this certificate. Further, students must have successfully completed SPED 630, Education of the Exceptional Child, to enroll in the certificate courses.

Written English Proficiency Requirement
Students must meet the English proficiency requirement by demonstrating competency on a written paper and examination.

Program						Units
SPED 777	Atypical Infant Development	 3
SPED 737	Infant Intervention or
	SPED 738	Preschool Intervention	 3
SPED 780	Assessment and Program Evalua-
		tion in Early Childhood Special 
		Education			 3
SPED 831	Internship in Early Childhood 
		Special Education		 3
		Minimum total			12

CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATIONAL THERAPY

Before being considered for acceptance to this certificate program, the student must first be eligible in accordance with all university requirements as outlined in the section "Certificate Programs" of this Bulletin. This same section includes university program guidelines and procedures to be followed in filing for the award of the certificate when it is completed.

Admission to Program
The specific requirements and procedures for acceptance to the certificate program in Educational Therapy are as follows.

Written English Proficiency Requirement
The student is expected to satisfy the graduate level English proficiency requirement through evaluation of written assignments in SPED 710.

Completion of the Program
Prerequisites
SPED 775	Diagnosis for the Learning 
		Handicapped
SPED 772	Curriculum for the Learning 
		Handicapped
SPED 774	Behavior Management
SPED 778	Teaching Reading to the Learning 
		Handicapped
SPED 616	Utilizing Microcomputers with 
		Special Learners
ISED 797	Seminar in Educational Research

Requirements					Units
SPED 709	Advanced Differential Diagnosis	3
SPED 710	Management of Clinical Practice	3
SPED 806	Seminar in Field Practices*	3
		Minimum total			9
*Enrollment contingent upon permission of adviser based on performance in advanced classes.

CERTIFICATE FOR INTEGRATED SERVICES

Admission to Program
For admission to the certificate program in Integrated Services, the following prerequisites and requirements must be met.

Course Requirements				Units
SPED 788	Public Policy and Legal Rights 
		of Persons with Disability or
	SPED 902	Public Policy in Special 
			Education (on advisement 
			only)			 3
SPED 801	Diversity in Special Education: 
		Family, Resources, and Culture	 3
EDUC/BSS 803	Integrated and Collaborative 
		Services for Children		 3
SPED 821	Advanced Problems in Special 
		Education (practicum modules)	 3
SPED 831	Internship in Special Education	 3
SPED 711	Student Support Seminar (2) 
		[repeated second semester]	 4
		Total for certificate		19
Written English Proficiency Requirement
Those students pursuing a master's degree concurrently must meet this requirement by conforming to the regulations for the Level One Literacy Requirement, as described by their respective graduate degree department. Students who already possess a master's degree will meet the requirement through writing assignments in the seminar, EDUC/BSS 803.

Completion Requirements
Students not possessing a credential or master's degree must complete a credential or a master's degree program concurrently with the award of this certificate. As per university requirements, two-thirds of the program units must be completed in residence.

CERTIFICATE IN REHABILITATION TEACHING FOR THE BLIND

Admission to Program
Admission to the certificate program follows standards required for a graduate degree. Applicants must hold a minimum of a 2.5 grade point average in an undergraduate degree from an accredited university, and submit three letters of recommendation and transcripts along with the departmental application. Program faculty interview candidates to determine if the program is suitable to meet the applicant's career objectives. Check with program advisers for courses required for a Master of Arts in Special Education with an emphasis in Rehabilitation Teaching for the Blind.

Written English Proficiency Requirement
Students must meet the English proficiency requirement by demonstrating competence through a written examination during the first semester of enrollment and the completion of a written paper.

Program						Units
SPED 601	Observation and Participation in 
		Special Education		 3
SPED 732	Adaptive Skills in Rehabilita-
		tion Teaching			 3
SPED 733	Seminar in Rehabilitation 
		Teaching of the Blind		 3
SPED 735	Technology for the Visually 
		Impaired			 3
SPED 749	Medical and Educational Impli-
		cations of Visual Impairment	 3
SPED 750	Survey of Education & Rehabilita-
		tion for the Visually Impaired	 2
SPED 752	Psychosocial Aspects of 
		Blindness			 3
SPED 754	Communication Skills for the 
		Visually Impaired		 3
SPED 755	Introduction to Orientation and 
		Mobility			 3
SPED 831	Internship in Special Education	 6
ISED 606	Principles of Adult Education	 4
		Minimum total			36

CERTIFICATE IN SERIOUS EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE

Admission Requirements
The following prerequisites and requirements must be met.

Curriculum
Students must have completed or be enrolled in either the Learning Handicapped (LH) or Severely Handicapped (SH) Specialist Credential program, or a Master of Arts in Special Education.

						Units
SPED 601	Observation and Participation 
		in Special Education		1
SPED 711	Student Support Seminar		2
SPED 781	Education of Seriously 
		Emotionally Disturbed		3
SPED 824	Advanced Behavioral and 
		Instructional Techniques	3
		Total units			9
Completion Requirements
Students not possessing a credential in LH or SH must complete a credentialing program concurrently with the award of this certificate. As per university requirements, two-thirds of the program units must be completed in residence.

CERTIFICATE IN VOCATIONAL SPECIAL EDUCATION

Admission Requirements
The student must have a bachelor's degree and either possess or be enrolled in a program that grants a credential or master's degree. The general requirements for admission to the graduate school at SFSU will apply. Students must have a GPA which allows them to be admitted to the university as an unclassified graduate student. Three professional references are required and transcripts of previous course work must be submitted. A prerequisite to the certificate program is SPED 630, Education of Exceptional Children.

Written English Proficiency Requirement
Students must meet the English proficiency requirement by demonstrating competence through a written examination during the first semester of enrollment and the completion of a written paper.

						Units
SPED 616	Utilizing Microcomputers with 
		Special Learners		 3
SPED 661	Career Education for the 
		Learning Handicapped in the 
		Public Schools			 3
SPED 805	Internship in Vocational Educa-
		tion for Special Needs Students	 3
SPED 850	Issues in Vocational Special 
		Education			 3
		Total units			12

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION: CONCENTRATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

AND

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION IN EDUCATION: CONCENTRATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Administrative Organization
The Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education is a program within the Colleges of Education of two campuses, San Francisco State University and the University of California, Berkeley. The program is administered through an Executive Committee composed of faculty members from both campuses. The committee, co-chaired by representatives from each campus, is responsible for satisfying the respective faculties of SFSU and UCB. Student performance and competencies are required to meet the scholarly requirements of the Graduate Divisions of both institutions.

Members of the faculty from SFSU are primarily from the Department of Special Education, which represents multiple areas relating to persons with disabilities, and from Communicative Disorders. Faculty from such departments as Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, and Political Science are also available to work with doctoral students. The majority of the Berkeley faculty come from the Graduate School of Education and includes faculty from each of the major divisions (Social and Cultural Studies; Educational Administration; Educational Psychology; Language and Literacy; Mathematics, Science, and Technology). In addition, faculty from several associated fields such as psychology, public health, optometry, anthropology, public policy, social welfare, and social and behavioral sciences also participate in the program.

The Executive Committee, in accordance with guidelines established by the Graduate Divisions and Colleges of Education on both campuses, and with the approval of the faculties, sets the requirements for admission, curriculum, and degree requirements. The co-chairpersons have the responsibility of serving as general advisers to doctoral students and working with the Executive Committee in the direct administration of the program.

Admission Requirements
In addition to the possession of a master's degree or its equivalent, major factors used in selection of candidates are both the undergraduate and graduate grade point averages, scores on the Graduate Record Examination, a sample of professional writing, a statement of purpose, three letters of recommendation, and a personal interview. Applicants who have not taken the Graduate Record Examination should make arrangements to take the test prior to or at the time of application. Scores should be reported to both institutions. Previous professional experience in working with exceptional individuals is highly desirable. Students are admitted at the beginning of the Fall semester each year. The application deadline for admission is January 6 of the same year.

Program Requirements
Basic requirements for all students include work in statistics and research methodology, professional seminars concerned with major public policy issues and research pertaining to disabilities, and an advanced graduate course in learning and development. The major purpose of the first year program is to have the student complete all courses designed to give competence in developing and implementing a research project and to critically review and interpret professional and research literature. In addition, work will be taken in the areas of the student's major interest. This should be helpful in giving direction to the nature of the position papers and research related to the dissertation.

Beyond the basic courses the program is individually designed to meet the student's interests and needs. The student works with faculty on both campuses in designing an acceptable program which meets the graduate requirements on both campuses. Internships are made available as part of the program.

The duration of the program is from three to four years. Two years of full-time residence is required. Enrollment alternates on a year-to-year basis between the two campuses with work taken on both campuses each year. Payment of fees on one campus permits the student to take work and utilize the facilities of the other campus at no additional charge. Students may elect courses from any department or college on either campus.

Oral Examining Committee

This committee is comprised of three members from each university. One member from each university must be outside the College of Education. Members of the Oral Examining Committee are selected by the student. The chair of the committee may come from either campus. The passing of the oral examination is prerequisite to admission to candidacy.

Dissertation Committee

The Dissertation Committee is comprised of at least three faculty members representing both campuses. One member must be outside the College of Education. The student selects the committee members and requests one individual to serve as chair.

Use of Community Resources

Internships and practicum experiences are available through a variety of private and public agencies. These experiences are designed to enhance leadership abilities in administration and supervision, teacher education, curriculum development and research. Included among the agencies available are the following: Northern California Diagnostic School for the Neurologically Handicapped, California School for the Deaf, California Department of Mental Hygiene, Developmental Centers for the Handicapped (Severely and Profoundly Handicapped), Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute, Mt. Diablo Rehabilitation and Therapy Center, Peninsula Children's Center (Severely and Emotionally Disturbed), Lawrence Hall of Science (U.C., Berkeley), Far West Regional Laboratory for Educational Development, Communicative Disorders Clinic (Department of Special Education, SFSU), California State Department of Education (Division of Special Education), Recreation Centers for the Handicapped, Public School Districts and County Offices, Stanford University School of Medicine, Kaiser Foundation Hospital (Oakland, CA).


Bulletin 1994-96 Table of Contents, SFSU Home Page

last modified July 26, 1995


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