English

College of Humanities
Dean: Paul Sherwin

Department of English Language and Literature
HUM 289
415-338-2264
Chair: Beverly Voloshin

Program Coordinators and Undergraduate Advisers:
Composition—Elise Ann Wormuth
Composition for Multilingual Students (CMS, formerly ESL)—Lisa Heyer
English Education—Nelson Graff
Language Studies—Rachelle Waksler, Troi Carleton
Literature—Bruce Avery

Graduate Coordinators:
Composition—Jennifer Trainor
Linguistics—Rachelle Waksler
Literature—Julie Paulson
TESOL—Barry Taylor

Faculty

Professors—Avery, Carleton, Christmas, Gillotte-Tropp, Green, Jain, Klironomos, Kohn, Krasny, Langton, Lyles, Peel, Schoerke, Shih, Soliday, Stec, Swanson, Voloshin, Waksler, Weinstein, Whalley, Wormuth

Associate Professors—Goen-Salter, Hanley, Kwok, Paulson, Roberge, Trainor

Assistant Professors—Abeywickrama, Cannon, Ching, Graff, Hackenberg, Keck, Lockhart, Merriman, Morris, Mylander, Olsher, Santos, Shahani, Yim

Programs

B.A. in English: Concentration in English Education
B.A. in English: Concentration in Individual Major
B.A. in English: Concentration in Language Studies
B.A. in English: Concentration in Literature
Minor in English and American Literature
Minor in English Language Studies
M.A. in English: Concentration in Composition
M.A. in English: Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
M.A. in English: Concentration in Linguistics
M.A. in English: Concentration in Literature
Certificate in Immigrant Literacies
Certificate in Teaching of Composition
Certificate in Teaching Post-Secondary Reading


Program Scope

The B.A. in English typically includes introductory course work in the study of language, the principles of critical investigation and critical writing, and the various methods of literary and/or language study. The requirements for each concentration are intended to make each student familiar with one of the principal areas of English studies, and to show how other areas of English studies can illuminate his or her area of concentration.

The Master of Arts in English with Concentration in Composition emphasizes theory, research, and practice in the teaching of writing at advanced secondary, community college, and college levels. It provides professional preparation for writing teachers and a rigorous scholarly foundation for students preparing for doctoral work in composition or adult literacy.

The Master of Arts in English with Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is offered as a result of a local, national, and international demand for persons prepared to perform various services in English as a foreign or second language. This concentration includes work in literature and foreign languages, with optional electives in education and the social sciences, as well as specialized work at an advanced level in linguistics and language teaching. The concentration provides training for teachers and a suitable background for supervisors and others responsible for the preparation of materials and courses of study in English as a foreign or second language. Completion of the Master of Arts in English with Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) may not fulfill the requirements for teacher credentialing in the State of California; some California credentials may require additional course work and/or examinations.

The Master of Arts in English with Concentration in Linguistics provides students with a solid grounding in the tools of language analysis. The course offerings in contemporary linguistic theory cover a broad spectrum of the levels of linguistic structure: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse analysis, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics. Since the program allows considerable choice in course work beyond a basic set of core requirements, the student in consultation with an adviser can plan a program to suit individual interests and career requirements.

The Master of Arts in English with Concentration in Literature develops professional skills, ensures breadth of knowledge, and provides opportunities for specialization. Broader relationships are studied in the survey, period, and genre courses; narrower, deeper investigations are undertaken in other seminars. The thesis explores critical possibilities well beyond the range of the seminar paper. It measures the candidate's ability to isolate and thoroughly examine a particular literary problem, theme, or idea.

The Certificate in the Teaching of Composition prepares students to teach composition at the secondary and post-secondary levels. It also provides experienced teachers with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of theory and practice in the field.

The Certificate in the Teaching of Post-Secondary Reading enables prospective and already practicing post-secondary teachers to attain proficiency in the teaching of reading at community college, college, and adult levels. Requirements for teaching reading in the community colleges (Assembly Bill 1725) specify that new instructors must possess a master's degree in education with a specialization in reading, or a master's in English or TESOL with additional certification in the teaching of reading.

Career Outlook

The English major can lead to a career in teaching as well as in professional fields such as law, publishing, information science, and business.

Students completing the Master of Arts with Concentration in Composition typically either teach at community colleges or go on to doctoral work with a view to teaching at a four-year institution. At the university level, specialists in composition and rhetoric are in increasing demand as researchers and directors of undergraduate writing programs. Two-year colleges are increasingly recognizing the need for professional training in the teaching of composition and are hiring accordingly.

The Master of Arts with Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) prepares students specifically to teach English to non-native speakers of the language. Most graduates of the program become TESOL classroom teachers in adult education classes, public schools, intensive language programs, and colleges either in the United States or foreign countries. Others choose jobs in related areas such as program administration, curriculum design, materials writing, and teacher training.

The Master of Arts with Concentration in Linguistics prepares students for a variety of teaching and research positions in which the emphasis is on the structure of language. Graduates of the program may teach English language or writing, work in the fields of speech production or speech recognition, or go on to further study in linguistics or related disciplines.

While the Master of Arts with Concentration in Literature is specifically designed to prepare a student for a career in teaching literature in community colleges or high schools in the U.S. or overseas, or for going on to a doctoral program, it has a far broader application. Any career requiring communication, research or analytic skills, literacy, a careful scholarly approach and a broad understanding of human values may use this program as a base. Those include publishing, editing, media, journalism, technical writing, government service, law, and administrative or research work in business or industry.

The Certificate in the Teaching of Composition prepares students for teaching composition at the advanced secondary, community college, and college levels. Many students in M.A. programs other than Composition take the certificate as a means of preparing themselves for teaching positions in two-year colleges, recognizing that other degree concentrations in English may not make them sufficiently marketable. In addition, a number of two-year college and high school English teachers take the courses to develop their expertise in composition.

The Certificate in Teaching Post-Secondary Reading enables prospective and already practicing post-secondary teachers to develop their ability to meet specific individual professional needs in the area of basic literacy and reading instruction. This certificate prepares students for teaching positions in the community colleges and community agencies where specialized background and techniques are necessary.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH

General Information

Students who are considering teaching in the secondary schools should see a departmental credential adviser before planning their program. Specific courses and an assessment of competencies are required for admission to the Secondary Education Credential program. Students should also contact the Teacher Preparation Center, Burk Hall 244, (415) 405-3594, regarding teaching credential information.

English majors with concentrations in Literature, Language Studies, or Individual Major are required to complete a 45-unit program consisting of 6 units of lower-division prerequisites, 15 units of core requirements and 24 units in an area of concentration. English majors with a concentration in English Education must complete 6 units of lower-division prerequisites, 12 units of core requirements, between 23 and 26 units in the area of concentration, plus 12 to 22 units in an area of emphasis.

English courses normally earn 3 units of credit. However, some courses which fulfill requirements for the major are variable unit courses and may earn 4 or 5 units. For further information on how to apply these additional units to completion of the major, consult with your adviser.

A maximum of 9 units of work in lower-division courses, including lower-division pre-/co-requisite units, may be accepted for credit in the major upon consent of an adviser.

A.P. credit and lower-division Composition courses (e.g. ENG 214) cannot be used to fulfill the lower-division requirement in the major or minor.

As of spring 2009, ENG 480: Junior Seminar fulfills the CSU Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR) for all English majors.

A maximum of 9 units of literature classes from other departments (such as Comparative and World Literature) may be accepted for credit in the major upon consent of an adviser.

B.A. in English: Concentration in English Education1

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Lower-division prerequisites/corequisites Units
Any two lower-division courses in literature in English. One of these courses may also satisfy the "Mythology and Oral Traditions" requirement in the English Education Core. 6
Core Requirements (12 units)
ENG 480 Junior Seminar 3
One upper-division course in Shakespeare 3
Two upper-division survey courses  
ENG 461 Literature in English II: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries 3
ENG 462 Literature in English III: Twentieth Century and Beyond 3
Concentration: English Education (23–26 units)
ENG 420 Introduction to the Study of Language 3
Applied Linguistics (choose one of the three listed below or see an adviser) 3
ENG 425 Language in Context  
ENG 426 Second Language Acquisition (co-requisite: introductory course in a foreign language)
ENG 706 Seminar in Sociolinguistics of Composition
World Literature 3
ENG 655 Literature and the Adolescent Reader 3
Mythology and Oral Traditions (if not taken as prerequisite above) (choose one of the nine courses below) 0-3
  CLAS 330 Ancient Epic Tales  
  CLAS 360 Greek and Roman Mythology
  CWL 250 Fables and Tales
  CWL 260 Myths of the World
  CWL 421 Celtic Literature
  ENG 636 Greek and Roman Myth and Modern Literature
  AFRS 233 African Mythology and Black Consciousness
  AIS 162 American Indian Oral Literature
  RAZA 435 Oral History and Traditions
ENG 417 Academic Literacy and the Urban Adolescent (formerly ENG 678) 3
ENG 419 Advanced Composition for Teachers 3
One speech performance class (choose one of the two listed below) 4
COMM 362 Introduction to Oral Interpretation  
COMM 363 Oral Interpretation of the First Person Voice
ENG 688 Assessment in English Language Arts (English Education e-portfolio – see below) 1
Emphasis–In addition, candidates must complete one of the following four emphasis areas.2
Emphasis: Literature (12 units)
ENG 460 Literature in English: Medieval Through Seventeenth Century 3
Senior Seminar 3
One additional upper-division elective 3
Theory Course 3
Total for Major 53-56
Emphasis: Language Studies (12-15 units)
ENG 421 Structure of English 3
ENG 422 History of English Language 3
ENG 424 Phonology and Morphology 3
ENG 425 Language in Context (if not used to satisfy Applied Linguistics above) 3
One Additional Elective in Language Studies (Chosen with approval of adviser) 3
Total for Major 53-59
Emphasis: Creative Writing (15 units)
C W 301 Fundamentals of Creative Writing 3
C W 302 Fundamentals of Creative Reading 3
Craft of Writing (choose one of the three below) 3
C W 511 Craft of Poetry  
C W 512 Craft of Fiction
C W 513 Craft of Playwriting
Upper-Division Creative Writing Electives 6
Total for Major 56-59
Emphasis: Drama3 (19-22 units)
Lower-Division Acting 6
TH A 130 Acting Workshop 1  
TH A 230 Acting Workshop 2
Stage Production, General and Technical Theatre 4
TH A 205 Introduction to Technical Theatre and Design (2)  
and one of the following three courses
TH A 310 Scenery and Properties Laboratory and Crew (2)
TH A 312 Costuming and Makeup Laboratory and Crew (2)
TH A 313 Lighting and Sound Laboratory and Crew (2)
Theatre Backgrounds (choose one of the three courses below) 3
TH A 401 Theatre Backgrounds: 500 BC-1642  
TH A 402 Theatre Backgrounds: 1642-1900
TH A 403 Theatre Backgrounds: 1900 - Present
Acting and Directing (upper division — one may be used for Speech Performance above, which would reduce the English Education requirements by 1 unit) 6-9
Total for Major 59-66

Important Notes:
1 Admission to the credential program at SFSU requires a GPA of 2.75 (B-) or better.
2 Check with an English Education adviser for specific courses that meet the requirements in the English Education concentration and with an adviser in your emphasis area to ensure that your electives are approved.
3 Candidates pursuing an emphasis in Drama should see a minor adviser in Theatre Arts to learn how to supplement the English Education major with a minor. The Drama emphasis area allows substitutions in the English Education Concentration. See an adviser if you are considering this area.

Candidates with a particular interest in Communication Studies or Comparative and World Literature can pursue special strands within those majors for subject matter competency in English.

Electronic Portfolio:
As a candidate in English Education, you must register for ENG 688 during your final semester, when you will compile an electronic portfolio to demonstrate that you have met all of the core outcomes of the Single Subject Program. You should include artifacts - examples of your work, and faculty and peer comments on your work - and reflections that explicitly tie elements of the artifacts to the outcome statements. You can find directions for the portfolio at http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~etrac/portfolio, and your instructors in English 417 (formerly 678), 419, and 655 will assist you with compiling materials and composing your reflections.

 

B.A. in English: Concentration in Literature

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Lower-division prerequisites/corequisites Units
Lower-division coursework in literature in English
(prerequisites for or corequisites with English 480: Junior Seminar)
6
Core Requirements (15 units)  
One upper-division course in Shakespeare 3
ENG 480 Junior Seminar 3
ENG 460 Literature in English I: Beginnings to Seventeenth Century 3
ENG 461 Literature in English II: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries 3
ENG 462 Literature in English III: Twentieth Century and Beyond 3
    Total for Core 15
Concentration: Literature  
One course in Language Studies with approval of adviser 3
One course in theory or criticism 3
One course in Global Literatures in English with approval of adviser 3
Electives (five courses)
Of these electives, one course must be in literature before 1800 (apart from core Shakespeare requirement), and one course must be a designated Senior Seminar.
15
    Total for Concentration: Literature 24
Total for major 45

 

B.A. in English: Concentration in Language Studies

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Lower-division prerequisites/corequisites Units
Lower-division coursework in literature in English, (prerequisite for or corequisite with English 480: Junior Seminar.) 6
Core requirements (15 units)  
ENG 420 Introduction to the Study of Language 3
One upper-division course in Shakespeare 3
ENG 480 Junior Seminar 3
Two upper-division survey courses (choose two of the three listed below) 6
ENG 460 Literature in English I: Beginnings to Seventeenth Century  
ENG 461 Literature in English II: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
ENG 462 Literature in English III: Twentieth Century and Beyond
    Total for Core 15
Concentration: Language Studies 24
ENG 421 Structure of English  
ENG 422 History of the English Language
ENG 424 Phonology and Morphology
ENG 425 Language in Context
Electives (Four courses chosen with approval of adviser)
Total for major 45

 

B.A. in English: Concentration in Individual Major

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Lower-division prerequisites/corequisites Units
Lower-division coursework in literature in English (prerequisites for or corequisites with English 480: Junior Seminar). 6
Core requirements (15 units)  
One upper-division course in Shakespeare 3
ENG 480 Junior Seminar 3
Three upper-division survey courses 9
ENG 460 Literature in English I: Beginnings to Seventeenth Century  
ENG 461 Literature in English II: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
ENG 462 Literature in English III: Twentieth Century and Beyond
    Total for Core 15
Concentration: Individual Major 24
Students enrolling in the Individual Major Program will follow a 24-unit course of study worked out in continuous close consultation with an individual program adviser. Each course of study is adapted to the background and interests of the student. The Individual Major is available to students who can define a course of study in a serious and coherent way. Interested students apply with the English Department advising coordinator.  
Total for major 45

A list of undergraduate advisers is available in the English Department (HUM 289) or on www.sfsu.edu/~english.

 

MINOR IN ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Program Units
Two lower-division courses in Literature 6
ENG 480 Junior Seminar 3
One of the following courses in Language Studies: ENG 420, 421, 422, 425, or 429. 3
One upper-division course in Shakespeare: ENG 583 or ENG 584 3
Two upper-division courses 6
Total for minor 21

NOTE: One Literature course, lower- or upper-division, must be in Global Literatures in English.

MINOR IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDIES

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Program Units
ENG 420 Introduction to the Study of Language 3
ENG 421 The Structure of English 3
ENG 424 Phonology and Morphology 3
ENG 425 Language in Context 3
3 units selected from the following: ENG 422, 426, 429, 651 3
Two lower- or upper-division courses in Literature 6
Total for Minor 21

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN ENGLISH

Advising is central to the program. Students must see their advisers to shape their programs initially, to gain approval for course choices, and to prepare for the oral examination. Please contact the graduate secretary, in English, for more detailed advising information.

All M.A. candidates who wish to receive the Single Subject Teaching Credential concurrently with the M.A. should confer with an appropriate adviser in the College of Education.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH: CONCENTRATION IN COMPOSITION

General Information

Applicants without an undergraduate major in English or a related field may be admitted conditionally but must complete 12 units (upper-division or graduate) of literature or related courses on advisement before being advanced to classified standing and filing the Graduate Approved Program. All applicants, regardless of their undergraduate major, must also complete 3 units, on advisement, in the area of language studies. Courses taken to meet admission requirements for non-English major applicants will not be accepted as part of the GAP.

ENG 700 should be completed in the first semester for students beginning in fall and in the second semester for students admitted in spring and must be passed with a grade of B or better.

The master's program permits students to include on their GAP only courses in which they have received grades of B or better. It is expected that a student completing this program is able to write prose publishable in academic journals.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: Students must demonstrate proficiency in written English prior to admissions by submitting a writing sample with their application. Level Two: Students must earn a grade of B or better in all of the required courses as well as satisfactorily complete ENG 898: Master's Thesis.

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Program Units
ENG 700 Introduction to Composition Theory 3
ENG 704 Pedagogy in Composition I 3
ENG 705 Pedagogy in Composition II 3
ENG 706 Seminar in Sociolinguistics of Composition 3
ENG 890 Seminar in Research in Composition 3
ENG 898 Master's Thesis and Oral Defense 3
Units to be taken with the approval of an adviser from the following: 12
ENG 429 Stylistics  
ENG 555 Short Story
ENG 635 Coming of Age in America
ENG 701 Theoretical Backgrounds in Community College and College Reading Instruction
ENG 707 Current Issues in Composition
ENG 708 Computers and the Teaching of Writing
ENG 709 Seminar in Teaching Integrated Reading and Writing I
ENG 710 Seminar in Teaching Integrated Reading and Writing II
ENG 715 Pedagogy and Practice in Post-secondary Reading
ENG 717 Projects in Teaching Literature
ENG 718 Supervision of Teaching Experience
ENG 651 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
ENG 730 Introduction to Graduate Study: TESOL
ENG 800 Special Topics in the Study of Composition and Reading
  or other approved courses within or outside the English Department
Minimum total 30

Culminating Experience. A master's thesis must be successfully completed by all candidates for the degree. The thesis, which investigates an appropriate subfield of inquiry, must have the recommendation and approval of two faculty thesis advisers. All SFSU specifications for completion of a master's thesis must be met. Before completion of the thesis, a student must pass an oral defense. Students may take ENG 890 twice and, if failing both times, will be recommended for declassification. They may repeat their oral defense once, and, if failing both times, will be recommended for declassification.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH: CONCENTRATION IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES

Admission to Program

Prerequisites: In order to be fully classified, students must meet the conditions below:

English 421 and 424 may be taken concurrently with English 730. English 425 and 426 must be completed prior to English 730. All linguistics/language studies courses must be taken for a letter grade, and students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA in these courses and no grade lower than a B- to continue in the program. Literature courses may be taken for a letter grade or credit if the courses selected permit the grading option desired.

Students whose native language is not English and whose B.A. was completed outside the U.S. must present evidence of a computer-based TOEFL score of at least 240 (Internet-based TOEFL: 95, paper-based TOEFL: 590) with a writing subscore of at least 4.5 (Internet-based writing score of at least 24). Applicants who do not meet this minimum TOEFL requirement will not be admitted; there is no conditional admission. A TOEFL score of 240 is considered to be very minimal; applicants who demonstrate stronger English proficiency with a higher TOEFL score (and higher writing subscore) will have a better chance of being recommended for admission to the Master of Arts in English: Concentration in TESOL program.

In addition, non-native speakers of English who are required to take the TOEFL, who are admitted, and who enroll, must take the ESL Placement Test (ESLPT) for assessment of their English writing proficiency upon entry to the university. They may be required to take ENG 670 and/or other writing course(s).

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: Satisfactory performance on the final research paper for ENG 426, Second Language Acquisition, or, if the course is waived, an equivalent paper. Students whose writing ability is not satisfactory will be required to take a graduate-level composition course, such as ENG 670 or CHS 514. This course may not be used to fulfill other requirements for the M.A. Level Two: Satisfactory performance in ENG 891.

Teaching Experience

Students who have fewer than two years of ESL/EFL teaching experience are required to get teaching experience before enrolling in ENG 733, Student Teaching. This requirement may be fulfilled by (a) enrolling in ENG 726, (b) an internship at the American Language Institute (http://www.sfsu.edu/~bulletin/current/rnlfac.htm), or (c) approval by an adviser of sufficient prior teaching experience.

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Core Courses (18 units)
The core courses listed below are required of all students graduating from this program.
Units
ENG 653 TESOL: Pedagogical Grammar 3
ENG 730 Introduction to Graduate Study of TESOL 3
ENG 731 Seminar: TESOL Listening and Speaking Skills 3
ENG 732 Seminar: TESOL Reading and Writing Skills 3
ENG 733 Student Teaching in TESOL 3
ENG 891 Integrative Seminar in TESOL 3
Group Courses (12 units)
Upper-division/graduate courses selected with adviser's approval from subjects in each of Groups I, II, and III (listed below)
12
Minimum total 30
and Master's Comprehensive Examinations or Master's Thesis and Oral Defense (see below)
Group I: Advanced Seminar in TESOL (3 units)
ENG 720 Seminar in Language, Literature, and Culture: TESOL
ENG 722 Seminar in Language Assessment
ENG 724 Special Topics in TESOL
ENG 736 Teaching ESL in the Community
Group II: Advanced Seminar in Linguistics (3 units)
ENG 719 Seminar: Contemporary Semantic Theory
ENG 723 Seminar in the Structure of English
ENG 725 Special Topics in Linguistics
ENG 727 Research Methods in Language Studies
ENG 728 Seminar in Sociolinguistics
ENG 729 Seminar in Psycholinguistics
Other graduate-level course in Linguistics approved by an adviser
Group III: Related Courses (6 units)
Related courses selected with the approval of an adviser.

During the second-to-last semester in the program, students are required to complete a form called the Graduate Approved Program (GAP), which lists those courses they are using to fulfill the Master of Arts in English: Concentration in TESOL program requirements. Students must earn an overall GPA of 3.0 and a B- or better in all courses listed in that document.

Foreign Language Requirement. For native speakers of English, one semester's work (3-5 units), or its equivalent, in a non-Indo-European language is required in order to complete the Master of Arts in English: Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. With the approval of an adviser, an Indo-European language which differs considerably from English (e.g., Farsi, Hindi) may be substituted. American Sign Language (ASL) may also be used to fulfill this requirement. For non-native speakers of English, the foreign language requirement is waived. (However, note that the Foreign Language Prerequisite Requirement applies to all.)

Culminating Experience. Either the Master's Examinations or a Master's Thesis must be successfully completed by all candidates for the degree. The oral and written comprehensive examinations assess the ability of students to integrate the knowledge and experience they have acquired in this field. The examinations are on the content areas covered in the program with an emphasis on methodological facets of TESOL. The candidate may take the examinations twice and, if failing both times, will be disqualified from the graduate program.

A thesis, which investigates a subfield of inquiry within TESOL, must have the recommendation and approval of two faculty thesis advisers. All SFSU specifications for completion of a master's thesis must be met. Upon completion of the thesis, the student must pass an oral defense.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH: CONCENTRATION IN LINGUISTICS

Admission to Program

Prerequisites: In order to be fully classified, students must have already taken the equivalents or take at SFSU the following:

All linguistics/language studies courses must be taken for a letter grade, and students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA in these courses with no grade lower than a B- to continue in the program.

Students whose native language is not English and whose B.A. was completed outside the U. S. must present evidence of a computer-based TOEFL score of at least 240 (Internet-based TOEFL: 95, paper-based TOEFL, 590) with a writing subscore of at least 4.5. (Internet-based writing score of at least 24). Applicants who do not meet this minimum TOEFL requirement will not be admitted; there is no conditional admission. A TOEFL score of 240 is considered to be very minimal; applicants who demonstrate stronger English proficiency with a higher TOEFL score (and higher writing subscore) will have a better chance of being recommended for admission to the Master of Arts in English: Concentration in Linguistics program.

In addition, non-native speakers of English must take the ESL Placement Test (ESLPT) for assessment of their English writing proficiency upon entry to the university. They may be required to take ENG 670 and/or other writing course(s).

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: Satisfactory performance on the final research paper for ENG 426, Second Language Acquisition, or, if the course is waived, an equivalent paper. Students whose writing ability is not satisfactory will be required to take a graduate-level composition course, such as ENG 670 or CHS 514. This course may not be used to fulfill other requirements for the degree. Level Two: Satisfactory performance in ENG 895 or 898.

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Required Core Courses Units
ENG 719 Seminar: Contemporary Semantic Theory 3
ENG 723 Seminar in the Structure of English 3
ENG 725 Special Topics in Linguistics 3
ENG 727 Research Methods in Language Studies 3
ENG 728 Seminar in Sociolinguistics 3
ENG 729 Seminar in Psycholinguistics 3
Total for core 18
Related Courses (9 units)
Units to be taken from one or more of the following groups of related courses or other courses approved by an adviser.
9
Linguistics
ENG 422 History of the English Language  
ENG 804 Training Practicum in Linguistics
PHIL 830 Seminar in the Philosophy of Language
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
ENG 651 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages: Basic Principles  
ENG 653 TESOL: Pedagogical Grammar
ENG 720 Seminar in Language, Literature, and Culture: TESOL
ENG 726 Practicum in TESOL
ENG 730 Introduction to Graduate Study: TESOL
ENG 731 Seminar: TESOL Listening and Speaking Skills
ENG 732 Seminar: TESOL Reading and Writing Skills
Special Topics in Linguistics
ENG 722 Seminar in Language Assessment  
ENG 724 Special Topics in TESOL (1-3)
ENG 725 Special Topics in Linguistics
Speech and Communication Studies
COMM 503 Sex Roles and Communication (4)  
COMM 541 Intercultural Communication (4)
COMM 750 Seminar in Communication and Culture (4)
Reading and Writing
ENG 657 Grammar and Rhetoric of the Sentence  
ENG 704 Pedagogy in Composition I
ENG 705 Pedagogy in Composition II
ENG 715 Pedagogy and Practice in Postsecondary Reading
Literature
ENG 720 Seminar in Language, Literature, and Culture: TESOL  
ENG 782 Seminar in Chaucer
One of the following: 3
ENG 898
    or
ENG 895
Master's Thesis
 
Field Study or Applied Research Project
 
    and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations
Minimum total 30
and Foreign Language Requirement (see below)

Master's Examinations. Failure in these examinations does not disqualify the candidate unless the examining committee so directs. The candidate may take the examinations twice, and, if failure occurs both times, will be disqualified from the graduate program.

Foreign Language Requirement. 10 semester units, or the equivalent, of a modern European language, plus a minimum of one semester or the equivalent of a non-Indo-European language, concurrent with ENG 426, is required of all candidates for the Master of Arts in English with Concentration in Linguistics. The student has the alternative of satisfying the foreign language requirement by examination. Units earned in foreign language study are not to be included in the student's Graduate Approved Program.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH: CONCENTRATION IN LITERATURE

Admission to Program

Applicants must meet general university requirements as stated in this Bulletin. Admission to the literature concentration is competitive.

In addition to the materials sent to the graduate admissions office, the applicant must submit the following items to the English Department in order to be considered for admission: English Department application; at least two letters of recommendation; one official set of transcripts; and a writing sample (five-page critical essay). Contact the graduate secretary in English for the department application and deadlines.

Applicants who meet the following requirements are eligible for admission to classified status: completion of an undergraduate English literature major, comparable to the major program at this university, and achievement of a GPA of at least 3.0 in the major.

Applicants who do not meet the above requirements may be accepted conditionally and can achieve classified status as follows:

Denial. Applications that do not permit admission under the above rules must be denied unless the Graduate Literature Curriculum Committee makes an exception.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: satisfactory performance on papers in ENG 741. Level Two: satisfactory completion of the M.A. thesis.

Program

The program consists of ten courses (minimum 30 units) of which seven courses (minimum 21 units) must be graduate level courses. Of these graduate courses, six (18 units) must be English Department courses, of which three (9 units) must be seminars from the 742-790 range. Students may choose either an emphasis in General Studies or Special Studies. See guidelines for each emphasis after the Program Requirements.

NOTE: English courses usually earn 3 units of credit; however, some upper-division courses which fulfill requirements for the M.A. in Literature may be offered for 3 to 5 units.

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Program Requirements Units
ENG 741 Theory of Literature 3
ENG 742-790 Graduate Seminars 9
Graduate level courses 6
Electives on advisement 9
ENG 898 Master's Thesis 3
and Master's Oral Examination
Minimum total 30

NOTE: ENG 704, 705, and 715 may not be included among the electives. Related courses from other departments (up to 6 units with approval of adviser) may be included.

Students must earn a B- or better in all courses listed on the GAP.

All students follow the General Studies Emphasis unless the Special Studies Emphasis is chosen before completing four of the required ten courses (see below).

General Studies Emphasis

Students are required to take one course (minimum of 3 units) from those listed below under the category Literary History, and one course (minimum 3 units) from those listed under the category Literary Theories and Methods. The department recommends that students take two from each category, and that at least one from each category be a graduate seminar (711, 712, 742-800).

Literary History

Undergraduate courses: 501, 503*, 504, 508*, 509, 510, 512*, 514, 516, 520, 521*, 522, 525*, 526, 527, 528, 529, 531, 532, 533, 535, 546, 550, 551, 552, 553, 554, 555, 556, 557, 558, 559, 570, 571, 573, 574, 580, 583, 584, 589; 655.

Graduate seminars: 711, 712, 750-789.

Or classes approved by an adviser.

Note: the asterisked courses might be conceivable as Literary Theory and Methods depending on what approach is being taken by the instructor. These are the "Studies in ..." format courses, and can count under Literary Theory and Methods only with the permission of an adviser.

Literary Theories and Methods

Undergraduate courses: 429, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607, 608, 610, 611, 612, 613, 614, 615, 616, 618, 630, 631, 633, 634, 635.

Graduate seminars: 742, 744, 745, 746, 747, 748, 790, 800.

Or classes approved by an adviser.

Early Period Requirement. Three of the 30 units in the General Studies Emphasis must be chosen from courses in literature before 1800. The early period requirement may be met by courses that also fulfill the above listed program requirements (for example, the early period course might also count as the Literary History or Literary Theories and Methods required course, or it might count as an elective). Thus, the early period requirement is a distribution requirement, not a course requirement.

Special Studies Emphasis

The special studies emphasis is available to students whose proposed fields of study (for example, cultural criticism or reader response approaches to literature) do not fall readily within the Literary History and Literary Theories and Methods rubrics of the general studies emphasis. Students who wish to focus on special studies must define their course of study in a written proposal submitted early in their graduate career and before completing four of the required ten courses. The proposal must be approved and signed by a graduate adviser and by the English Department's graduate literature program coordinator.

The number of courses and seminars, graduate level courses, and electives selected individually by the student and proposed for the special studies emphasis must conform to the program requirements (see above).

Culminating Experience

Master's Thesis, Prospectus, and Oral Examination required for the General Studies and Special Studies Emphases. The prospectus and the oral are scheduled before a student begins writing the thesis. The prospectus is a written statement, usually including the controlling purpose of the thesis; the selection of literary materials; the relevant scholarship and criticism; and the value and interest of the study. The oral is a one-hour examination on the prospectus conducted by the two thesis readers.

A candidate who has failed the oral examination may not take it again before the next regular semester. A candidate who failed the examination twice will not be permitted to continue in the program for the M.A. in Literature. Consult The Prospectus and the Thesis handout available in the English Office for more information.

CERTIFICATE IN IMMIGRANT LITERACIES

The Certificate in Immigrant Literacies is designed to provide academic training in the study of language, literacies, and the immigrant experience. The program integrates community service learning to enable Certificate students to integrate their professional expertise and cross-disciplinary thinking with meaningful civic action.

Admissions Requirements and Application Process

For matriculated students, admission to the certificate program requires submission of an online application. Application materials include: (1) a short personal statement which outlines the applicants’ interests in immigrant language and literacy issues; (2) transcript, (3) current vita or résumé; (4) names and contact information for TWO references. (provide name, job title or relationship, address, phone number); and (5) evidence of completion of the university’s Level I written English proficiency requirement. The same application materials will be required from applicants who are non-matriculated students.

For matriculated graduate students in TESOL: Evidence of completion of the written English proficiency requirement is demonstrated by satisfactory completion of ENG 426 Second language acquisition.

For matriculated graduate students in other departments: Students should check the requirements as stipulated by their program area.

For non-matriculated students: Students are asked to include the following in their applications materials: passing score on the Analytical Writing section of the GRE or GMAT; or a 3-4 page academic writing sample (e.g., research paper, grant proposal, publication) using rubrics approved by CWEP and held on file in the graduate division office.

A small fee is charged for processing the application.

Applicants who are matriculated graduate students may enter the Certificate Program at any point after acceptance into a SF State graduate degree program. Graduate students who wish to apply must consult with their adviser immediately to find out how best to sequence their coursework to satisfy both home Department requirements and Certificate requirements.

Applicants who are not currently matriculated in any SF State graduate degree program (e.g., in-service ESOL teachers, health professionals) must apply (via graduate admissions) and be admitted to the University and to the graduate Certificate Program. Acceptance into the program is with approval of the Certificate Program Director and consent of program faculty following review of the application materials (listed above).

Students interested in admission to the certificate programs need not have completed undergraduate degree programs in English literature or language studies, nor do they need to be enrolled in master's programs offered in the Department of English. Graduate students from master's programs offered in this department should contact their advisers to find out how many of the certificate courses may be used towards meeting degree requirements in their MA program. Unclassified graduate students and candidates for degrees in other departments may be accepted into the program with the approval of the certificate faculty.

Out-of-state and international students are welcome to apply to the Program. For applicants whose native language is not English: a recent internet based TOEFL (IBT) score of 95, with an essay rating of 24. Applicants who do not meet the minimum TOEFL requirement will NOT be admitted; there is NO conditional admission. A TOEFL score of 95 is considered to be very minimal; applicants who demonstrate stronger English proficiency with a higher TOEFL score (and higher essay rating) will have a better chance of being admitted.

Program Units
ENG 832 Seminar in Immigrant Literacies & Community Based Projects 3
Select one of the following: 3
ENG 736 Teaching ESOL in the community  
ENG 735 Community-based curriculum development
Select one of the following: (see note below) 3
HED 810 Public health and community organizing  
HED 835 Health policy
HED 845 Training and Educational Process
A AS 833 Seminar: Asian American Family and Identity
A AS 875 Asian American Community Health Issues
ETHS 710 Theories and Concepts in Ethnic Studies
OR other graduate-level SF State course related to the topic of immigrant literacies and civic engagement (with approval of adviser).
Capstone: 3
Special Study, e.g., ENG 899 for MA TESOL students; HED 899 for Master of Public Health students; ETHS 750: Ethnic Community Practicum for Ethnic Studies students; or equivalent graduate-level community service-learning course (with approval of adviser)  
Total 12

CERTIFICATE IN THE TEACHING OF COMPOSITION AND CERTIFICATE IN TEACHING POST-SECONDARY READING

The Certificate in Teaching of Composition and the Certificate in Teaching Post-secondary Reading are designed to provide theoretical and pedagogical preparation for students who plan to teach writing and/or reading in post-secondary classrooms.

Admission to Program

For matriculated students, admission to either or both of the certificate programs requires completion of the internal English Department application, which should be submitted to the department.

This internal application is available in the main department office, HUM 289, or at www.sfsu.edu/~english. Those seeking the Certificates in Teaching Composition or Post-secondary Reading must submit the application during their first semester of certificate coursework.

Anyone who wishes a certificate but is not currently a matriculated graduate student will need to apply to the university, using the published admissions process, before being considered for admission to the composition or reading certificate programs. For information about how to complete this application, students should consult the appropriate graduate coordinator of the Division of Graduate Studies.

Students interested in admission to the certificate programs need not have completed undergraduate degree programs in English literature or language studies, nor need they be enrolled in master's programs offered in the Department of English. Graduate students from master's programs offered in this department should contact their advisers to find out how many of the courses taken for composition or reading certificates they may use to meet degree requirements in their MA program. Unclassified graduate students and candidates for degrees in other departments may be accepted into the program with the approval of the composition or reading faculty.

Upon completion of all the certificate courses, the students must fill out a CAP form (Certificate Approved Program) for the final award of the degree. Please contact the English Department in HUM 289 for specific instructions.

All certificate candidates should familiarize themselves with the general guidelines for earning a certificate on this campus. A student planning to earn an undergraduate or graduate certificate must meet the requirements listed in the Certificate Programs section of this Bulletin. Any student who decides he/she wishes to enter the MA program in Composition must consult his/her adviser immediately to find out how best to proceed.

Certificate in the Teaching of Composition

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: students will meet Level One requirements in their home department. Level Two: students must earn a grade of B or better in all of the required courses.

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Program Units
ENG 657 Grammar and Rhetoric of the Sentence 3
ENG 704 Pedagogy in Composition I 3
ENG 705 Pedagogy in Composition II 3
Select one of the following: 3
ENG 429 Stylistics  
ENG 656 Topics in Reading in the Secondary School
ENG 658 Projects in Study and Reading Techniques
ENG 700 Introduction to Composition Theory
ENG 701 Theoretical Backgrounds in Community College and College Reading Instruction
ENG 706 Seminar in Sociolinguistics of Composition
ENG 707 Current Issues in Composition
ENG 708 Computers and the Teaching of Writing
ENG 709 Seminar in Teaching Integrated Reading and Writing I
ENG 710 Seminar in Teaching Integrated Reading and Writing II
ENG 715 Pedagogy and Practice in Post-secondary Reading
ENG 717 Projects in the Teaching of Literature
ENG 718 Supervision of Teaching Experience
ENG 732 Seminar: TESOL Reading and Writing Skills
ENG 800 Special Topics in the Study of Composition and Reading
Total for program 12

Certificate in Teaching Post-secondary Reading

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: students will meet Level One requirements in their home department. Level Two: students must earn a grade of B or better in all of the required courses.

Courses are 3 units unless otherwise indicated. On-line course descriptions are available.

Program Units
ENG 701 Theoretical Backgrounds in Community College and College Reading Instruction 3
ENG 709 Seminar in Teaching Integrated Reading and Writing I 3
ENG 710 Seminar in Teaching Integrated Reading and Writing II 3
ENG 715 Pedagogy and Practice in Post-secondary Reading 3
Total for certificate 12


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Last modified July 06, 2012 by bulletin@sfsu.edu