Computer Science

College of Science and Engineering
Dean: Sheldon Axler

Department of Computer Science
TH 906
415-338-1008
E-mail: cs@sfsu.edu (undergraduate);
csgrad@sfsu.edu (graduate)
Web Site: http://cs.sfsu.edu
Chair: Dragutin Petkovic

Undergraduate Advisers: Dujmovic, Hsu, Kroll, Lank, Puder, Singh, Wong, Yoon
Graduate Coordinator: Levine
Graduate Advisers: Levine, Murphy

Faculty

Professors—Dujmovic, Eisman, Levine, Murphy, Petkovic, Wong

Associate Professors—Hsu, Kroll

Assistant Professors—Okada, Puder, Singh, Yang, Yoon

Adjunct ProfessorsóButurovic, Hagmann

Lecturers—Osborne, Rankovich-Dujmovic, Tomasevich,Wall

Programs

B.S. in Computer Science
Minor in Computer Science
M.S. in Computer Science
M.S. in Computer Science: Concentration in Computing for Life Sciences
M.S. in Computer Science: Concentration in Software Engineering


Program Scope

The primary mission of Computer Science is to prepare students for employment as computer specialists in the software development and computer manufacturing industries and for continued study toward advanced degrees. The department offers a broad curriculum covering the major areas of the computing discipline integrated with teamwork and group projects. Students are exposed to the fundamentals of computing architecture and computing theory, and focus their studies on the areas of software and system development. Faculty work directly with students to develop in them the skills and knowledge of computing professionals.

Department faculty are committed to teaching excellence. They remain current in the rapidly changing field of computing technology through continued research and publications, direct consultation with local industries, and seminar programs that bring top researchers to campus to speak on current developments in the field. Programs such as the Supervised Industrial Research Program provide opportunities for graduate students to complement their academic learning with real world experience.

The department has an additional commitment to sharing its knowledge and skills with the rest of the university community, with local schools, and with community based organizations of the Bay Area.

The B.S. program stresses a basic foundation in mathematics and physics, and a thorough study of the fundamentals of the discipline--software development, computer architecture, operating systems, programming languages, algorithms, and the theoretical foundations of computer science. A wide variety of elective courses such as database systems, artificial intelligence, computer architecture and graphics, allow students to emphasize study in selected areas. Ethical and social issues of computing are discussed throughout the curriculum. Senior courses include teamwork and group project assignments in order to better prepare students for the future job markets. A number of skill based courses have been added to provide necessary training in the latest software technologies.

The Master of Science in Computer Science prepares students for a wide variety of careers in computing or related industries as well as for advanced study toward a Ph.D. Our program blends strong and practical education with high quality research and project activities. In addition to a curriculum covering the breadth of the computing discipline, the program offers two specializations, software engineering and computing for life sciences. The concentration in software engineering covers the design and development of large yet useable software systems in a world where software teams are distributed globally. The concentration in computing for life sciences covers the development of computer applications and technologies aimed at supporting the burgeoning biotechnology industry. The research component of our graduate studies has been significantly increased and involves students in pursuing research projects, writing papers and attending conferences. The program is supported by the newly formed SFSU Center for Computing for Life Sciences (http://cs.sfsu.edu/ccls/index.html) and several specialized laboratories which provide research and project focus as well as opportunities to collaborate with faculty and students from other SFSU departments and industry.

Computing Facilities

Central Facilities

General Undergraduate Computing Facilities

Specialized Centers, Laboratories, and Computing Resources

Career Alternatives

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Students intending to enter this program at the freshman level should complete two years of algebra and one semester of trigonometry in high school. One year each of high school geometry and physics, as well as basic knowledge of computer organization and programming, are very desirable.

All lower division courses (course numbers below 300) included among the degree requirements are available at many community colleges in California; students intending to enter the program upon transferring to San Francisco State University from a community college should take as many of those courses there as possible.

Students should plan their program of study in the major with the help of a departmental adviser as soon as possible in order that the correct sequence of courses be taken and a proper set of electives be chosen. It is also suggested that students consult with an adviser before selecting courses to meet General Education requirements. (See program below for acceptable science electives.)

Students are encouraged to participate in the Computer Science Cooperative Education Program at SFSU. Under this program, they may obtain industrial employment related to their academic studies. This combination of on-the-job training and academic experience can greatly enhance the value of an undergraduate degree in computer science.

An Endowed Scholarship Fund, established in the memory of Jules H. Strauss, offers an annual award to a computer science major who shows scholarly accomplishment and demonstrates a financial need.

Students are advised that except for the laboratory course, CSC 212, CR/NC grades are not acceptable in courses to be counted for the computer science major or minor programs.

On-line course descriptions are available.

Mathematics and Physics (25 units)
Units
MATH 226-227 Calculus I-II (4 each)
8
MATH 324 Probability and Statistics with Computing
3
MATH 325 Linear Algebra
3
MATH 330 or
CSC 330
Discrete Mathematical Structures for Computer Science
3
PHYS 220/222 General Physics with Calculus I/Laboratory (3/1)
4
PHYS 230/232 General Physics with Calculus II/Laboratory (3/1)
4
Science Electives (4 units)
Science electives selected from among the following GE Segment II Physical and Biological Sciences, Category B, Biological Sciences courses: BIOL 100 and BIOL 101, BIOL 210 and BIOL 211, and BIOL 230. Other science courses are subject to approval.
4
Core Computer Science Requirements (21 units)
CSC 210 Introduction to Computer Programming
3
CSC 212 Introduction to Software Development
2
CSC 213 Fundamentals of Computer Science
3
CSC 305 Social and Ethical Implications of Computing
1
CSC 310 Assembly Language Programming and Introduction to Computer Organization
3
ENGR 356 Basic Computer Architecture
3
CSC 313 Data Structures
3
CSC 413 Software Development
3
Advanced Computer Science Requirements (21 units)
CSC 415 Principles of Operating Systems
3
CSC 510 Analysis of Algorithms I
3
CSC 600 Programming Language Design
3
Senior Presentations. Each major is required to make an oral presentation and a written presentation in an area of computer science during his/her senior year. Guidelines for the presentations are available on the Computer Science web site: http://cs.sfsu.edu.
0
Electives (see requirements below)
12
Total for major
71

Elective Requirements (four 3-unit courses)

Electives are selected from the nine subareas of computer science listed below. Electives must meet the following requirements.

NOTE: It is recommended that students planning to continue their study of computer science in graduate school take both CSC 656 and CSC 520.

The same courses can be used to meet depth and breadth requirements. However, a course cannot be counted towards more than one area of emphasis. For example, the following four electives can be used to meet the requirements in different ways in order to highlight a different area of emphasis (areas of emphasis are shown in parentheses):

The different ways in which these courses can meet the elective requirements are:

Emphasis: Algorithms and Theory of Computing

CSC 520 meets requirement 1
CSC 520 and CSC 675 meet requirement 2 (depth in Algorithms)
CSC 520 or CSC 675 (Algorithms), CSC 656 (Architecture), and CSC 668 (Programming Languages or Software Engineering) meet requirement 3

Emphasis: Programming Languages

CSC 520 meets requirement 1
CSC 520 and CSC 668 meet requirement 2 (depth in Programming Languages)
CSC 520 or CSC 668 (Programming Languages), CSC 656 (Architecture), and CSC 675 (Database) meet requirement 3

In contrast, for example, the following courses do not meet the elective requirements because CSC 520 cannot be double counted as Algorithms and Programming Languages:

The courses listed below constitute a partial list of suitable courses for meeting the elective requirements. The department frequently offers, under the title of CSC 690, new courses that meet elective requirements. Many students also find that, by their senior year, they are prepared to undertake certain graduate courses in computer science. Occasionally, students in good academic standing may take CSC 699, Independent Study, instead of a regularly scheduled course. Students are advised to check university and college regulation regarding academic standing requirements. Finally, it is occasionally possible to use a course taken in a different department or at another university (but only if the course is not offered at San Francisco State University) to satisfy elective requirements. Any course substitutions must be approved in advance by a senior adviser.

Areas of Special Emphasis

Algorithms and Theory of Computing
CSC 520, Theory of Computing
CSC 630, Computer Graphics Systems Design
CSC 637, Software Techniques for Computer Music
CSC 671, Neural Networks
CSC 675, Introduction to Database Systems
MATH 400, Numerical Analysis I

Architecture
CSC 641, Computer Performance Evaluation
CSC 656, Computer Organization

Artificial Intelligence
CSC 620, Natural Language Processing
CSC 665, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
CSC 671, Neural Networks

Database
CSC 664, Multimedia Systems
CSC 675, Introduction to Database Systems

Graphics and Multimedia
CSC 630, Computer Graphics Systems Design
CSC 637, Software Techniques for Computer Music
CSC 642, Human-Computer Interaction
CSC 664, Multimedia Systems

Numerical and Symbolic Computing
MATH 400, Numerical Analysis I

Operating Systems and Distributed Processing
CSC 615, UNIX Programming
CSC 641, Computer Performance Evaluation
CSC 645, Computer Networks
CSC 650, Secure Networked Systems
CSC 651, System Administration
CSC 667, Internet Application Design and Development

Programming Languages
CSC 520, Theory of Computing
CSC 620, Natural Language Processing
CSC 640, Software Engineering
CSC 665, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
CSC 668, Object Oriented Programming

Software Engineering
CSC 640, Software Engineering
CSC 642, Human-Computer Interaction
CSC 667, Internet Application Design and Development
CSC 668, Object Oriented Programming

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Many university students want to acquire sufficient computer science background to enable them to use computers effectively in their major areas, or to provide an alternative source of income after graduation, but do not want to study computer science in the depth required for the B.S. degree. For such students, a minor consisting of the most central courses in the B.S. program, plus some electives, is ideal. Students are advised that except for the laboratory course, CSC 212, CR/NC grades are not acceptable in courses to be counted for the Computer Science Minor.

Program Requirements
Units
CSC 210 Introduction to Computer Programming
3
CSC 212 Introduction to Software Development
2
CSC 213 Fundamentals of Computer Science
3
CSC 305 Social and Ethical Implications of Computing
1
CSC 310 Assembly Language Programming and Introduction to Computer Organization
3
CSC 313 Data Structures
3
CSC 413 Software Development
3
Upper division computer related elective by approval of the minor adviser
3
Total for minor
21

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Program Description

All students share breadth requirements in the areas of computing foundations, computer systems, and software development. Particular concentrations then differ in the choice of courses that provide depth in a chosen area and in the work done for the culminating experience. Students are expected to decide on a concentration prior to enrollment in the second semester. Integrated into the curriculum is significant team and project experience. There are two options for the mandatory culminating experience, the master's thesis or the applied research project.

Elective Requirements

All students are required to include six units of elective credits in their program. Electives include:

Note: A maximum of six units of upper division courses (numbered below 700) may be applied to the degree with the consent of the course instructor and graduate adviser.

Graduate Seminar Requirement

In addition to curricular requirements, prior to enrolling in CSC 895/898, all graduate students are required to attend the department Graduate Seminar series during one semester of their studies. These weekly seminars explore current topics in computer science research and assist students with choosing a topic for the culminating experience. Details for meeting this requirement may be found at http://www.cs.sfsu.edu/news/2005_2006-Pernet-Requirments.html.

Practicum

This 1-3 unit option is chosen by students who wish to enhance their master’s degree by completing an industrial practicum. After finding the job in local industry, the student will submit a research proposal to the department’s supervisor (normally the department chair) that describes the expected work and learning outcome. The department’s supervisor must approve the proposal before the student begins the research. Once approved, the student will enroll in 1 unit of CSC 893, Supervised Industrial Research. At the conclusion of the work experience, the student must file a written report outlining the research and work experience. The report is submitted to the department’s supervisor. Students may repeat CSC 893 for a maximum of 3 units. The total number of units for the degree for students who complete CSC 893 will be 33 units. It is recommended that this option be pursued only during the summer.

NOTE: CSC 893 allows international students to obtain permission to work off campus for the duration of the course.

Admission to Program

Admission to the graduate program in computer science is a two-step process that should be completed simultaneously:

  1. Apply to San Francisco State University: Complete the on-line CSU Mentor application. Follow all other requirements for admission to the university by accessing www.sfsu.edu/~gradstdy/.
  2. Apply to the Department of Computer Science graduate program: Full details can be found at http://cs.sfsu.edu/GradApply.html.

We encourage students with 4 year degrees other than Computer Science to apply to our program as conditional applicants. Please check the above link for details.

Financial Assistance

Graduate assistantships are occasionally available for qualified master's students. These opportunities include participating in funded research projects, assisting with management of departmental and university computer laboratories as well as lecturer positions for beginning undergraduate computer science courses. Frequently, there are internship opportunities available for work at local companies. International students should address all questions related to their visa status and eligibility for practical training (off-campus work) to the Office of International Programs.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

Level One: Effective Spring 2003, all computer science students admitted to the M.S. program are required to satisfy English Level One no later than their first semester of enrollment in the core graduate courses. Level One is satisfied by either a score of PASS on the Graduate Essay Test (GET, administered by the SFSU Testing Center) or a passing grade in SCI 614 or CHS 514. Students may enroll in CHS 514 if all sections of SCI 614 are full SCI 614 is strongly recommended for all students who wish to develop their skills in professional writing. Students are allowed to take the GET only once, preferably prior to their first semester of enrollment. Level Two: the second level of proficiency in written English must be demonstrated before graduation. At this time, the student must demonstrate writing skills which exemplify scholarly style in computer science. This is demonstrated by the master's thesis or the research project.

Policy on Enrollment While Conducting Directed Research

Pursuant to Policy F89-165 adopted by the Academic Senate in 1989, the Computer Science Department has adopted the policy that all graduate students who are working with a research adviser (above and beyond general advising during office hours) and/or having his/her thesis or project reviewed, must enroll in at least one unit of CSC 895, 897, 898, or 899. Registered students will have priority for departmental computing resources.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

For general information for all computer science students, see Graduate Programs in Computer Science above.

On-line course descriptions are available.

Core Requirements
Units
Computing Foundations--units selected from the following:
3
CSC 810 Analysis of Algorithms II
 
CSC 825 Automata Theory and Formal Languages
Computer Systems--units selected from the following:
3
CSC 835 Distributed Systems
 
CSC 846 Systems Architecture
Software Development--units selected from the following:
3
CSC 848 Advanced Software Engineering
 
CSC 868 Object Oriented Programming
Total for core
9
General Requirements--units selected from the following: (For concentration requirements, see below.)
9
CSC 720 Advanced Operating Systems
 
CSC 730 Database Systems
CSC 830 Advanced Computer Graphics
CSC 842 Human Computer Interaction
CSC 845 Computer Networks
CSC 864 Multimedia Systems
Electives-upper division/graduate 3-unit electives selected on advisement
6
Practicum Option-(on advisement) up to 3 units of CSC 893
3
Culminating Experience
CSC 897 Independent Research or
3
CSC 899 Special Study
CSC 895 Applied Research Project and Oral Project Presentation or
3
CSC 898 Master's Thesis and Oral Defense of Thesis
Total for culminating experience
6
Total
30 - 33

Note: CSC 848, Advanced Software Engineering, is required for the software engineering concentration.

Master of Science in Computer Science: Concentration in Software Engineering

For general information for all computer science students, see Graduate Programs in Computer Science above.

Program
Units
Core Requirements (see above)
9
Concentration Requirements
CSC 840 Software Metrics and Quality Assurance
3
CSC 841 Computer Performance Evaluation
3
CSC 842 Human Computer Interaction
3
Total for concentration
9
Electives-upper division/graduate 3-unit electives selected on advisement
6
Practicum Option-(on advisement) up to 3 units of CSC 893
3
Culminating Experience
CSC 897 Independent Research or
3
CSC 899 Special Study
CSC 895 Applied Research Project and Oral Project Presentation or
3
CSC 898 Master's Thesis and Oral Defense of Thesis
Total for culminating experience
6
Total
30 - 33

Master of Science in Computer Science: Concentration in Computing for Life Sciences

For general information for all computer science students, see Graduate Programs in Computer Science above.

Program
Units
Core Requirements (see above)
9
Concentration Requirements
CSC 730 Database Systems
3
CSC 857 Bioinformatics Computing
3
CSC 858 Biology for Computer Science Majors
3
Total for concentration
9
Electives-upper division/graduate 3-unit electives selected on advisement
6
Practicum Option-(on advisement) up to 3 units of CSC 893
3
Culminating Experience
CSC 897 Independent Research or
3
CSC 899 Special Study
CSC 895 Applied Research Project and Oral Project Presentation or
3
CSC 898 Master's Thesis and Oral Defense of Thesis
Total for culminating experience
6
Total
30 - 33


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