Design and Industry

College of Creative Arts
Dean: Keith Morrison

Department of Design and Industry
FA 121
415-338-2211
Web Site: www.sfsu.edu/~daiwww
E-mail: dai@sfsu.edu
Chair: Ricardo Gomes

Graduate Coordinator: Martin Linder

Faculty

Professors—Chen, Cheng, Edwards, Iandoli, Veeder

Associate Professor—Gomes

Assistant Professors—Catanese, Kelch, Linder

Lecturers—Gates, Neble

Programs

B.A. in Industrial Arts
B.A. in Industrial Arts: Concentration in Product Design and Development
B.S. in Industrial Technology
Minor in Industrial Arts
M.A. in Industrial Arts


Program Scope

The Department of Design and Industry (DAI) offers a Bachelor of Arts in Industrial Arts, a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology, a Bachelor of Vocational Education, a Minor in Industrial Arts, and a Master of Arts in Industrial Arts.

The Bachelor of Arts in Industrial Arts (BAIA) is an interdisciplinary program which provides the student with an opportunity to develop an individualized course of study in the areas of general design studies, visual communication design, and technology. With the guidance of a DAI adviser, each student develops a major program including 21 units of DAI core courses and a minimum of 24 units of electives. The individual program can be based upon a technical concentration acquired in a community college or an equivalent technical program to be completed during the degree work at San Francisco State University.

Students who are considering teaching industrial and technology education (industrial arts) should consult a Design and Industry adviser before planning their majors. Specific courses and a competency assessment are required for admission to the credential program in this area.

The Bachelor of Arts in Industrial Arts with Concentration in Product Design and Development (BAIA/PDD) is a program for students who intend to focus their studies in product-oriented design applications. The 55-unit concentration addresses the creation of industrial goods and services and concentrates on three principle aspects of design: process, people, and product. The BAIA/PDD incorporates the study of user-centered needs, relative to the responsible and resourceful implementation of technology innovation, materials, marketing principles, and aesthetic values.

The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology (BSIT) is a management-oriented technical curricula built upon a program of studies drawn from the Departments of Design and Industry, Information Systems and Business Analysis, Mathematics, and Management. The Bachelor of Science prepares students for technical leadership responsibilities with a broad variety for industries including manufacturing, communication, transportation, and utility services. Graduates in the field of industrial technology are prepared to function as technical managers in industry. Preparation in the BSIT requires the student to choose an emphasis in product development and manufacturing technology, graphic communication technology, or electronics technology.

The Master of Arts in Industrial Arts (MAIA) offers two programs--one for the industry professional and one for the public school teacher. The two programs have the same general requirements but differ in courses taken and goals pursued. Students with a wide range of backgrounds work with a graduate adviser to design M.A. programs which meet their career goals. The student who already has an interdisciplinary B.A., usually continues deeper into the original B.A. disciplines. The student who enters with a single subject B.A., perhaps from another university, frequently looks toward specific employment and adds course work in a second discipline.

The Minor in Industrial Arts is designed to provide non-major undergraduates with a broad exposure to applications and benefits of design and technology. Students will be able to obtain a general knowledge of and foundation in professional design and technology skills in respect to the enrichment of their primary major.

Faculty

The faculty of the Department of Design and Industry are highly qualified design and technology educators, researchers, and technology practitioners. The faculty comes from many leading institutions of higher learning across the nation. Each individual possesses unique skills and preparation; teaching as well as advising responsibilities are always assigned to faculty members based on individual strengths.

The department benefits from a pool of part-time lecture faculty to provide additional strength in many instructional areas. Their experiences and involvement with industry and technology are valuable assets to the program. Faculty members in the department frequently participate in short courses, workshops, and conferences to upgrade their skills and practice in changing technologies and new applications. The faculty is actively involved in various forms of design and applied technical research activities for the purpose of instructional improvement, technical advancement, and professional contribution.

Facilities

The Department of Design and Industry is housed in the Fine Arts Building on the western edge of the campus. Contemporary technologies, such as computer graphics, computer-integrated manufacturing, digital electronics, and automation systems are incorporated into the instructional/learning environment. The facilities include digital laboratories for graphic design, interactive media, CAD, 3-D surface and solid-modeling computer graphics, and computer-aided manufacturing/rapid-prototyping. Technical laboratories are designed for the study of manufacturing, material science (wood, plastics, metal, and material composites), graphic communication (printing), electronics, product design and development.

Career Outlook

Business and Industry

Middle Management
Project Management
Product Development
Sales-Buyer
Purchasing
Field Service
Technical Services
Job Development Training
Market Research
Production Coordinator
Quality Control
Research Technician

Design

Product Design
Visual Communication Design (graphic design and interactive digital media)
Graphic Communication (printing)
Interdisciplinary

Education

Teaching
Curriculum
Supervision
Administration

Advising

During the first semester and/or prior to admission to the department, all students are required to enroll in DAI 370, Colloquium. Freshmen may also enroll in CA 100 or AU 101, First Year Experience. A requirement of the Colloquium is to meet with an adviser and complete a "Major/minor contract."

During matriculation and prior to the semester of graduation, students must periodically check with their adviser to update their major advising contract and program goal.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS

On-line course descriptions are available.

Core Requirements Units
DAI 300 Design I 3
DAI 370 Colloquium [taken first semester] 3
DAI 505 Research and Development Laboratory [taken last semester] 3
Units selected from the following (must choose from different groups): 6
DAI 110 The Arts of Industry or  
  DAI 210  Industrial Science
DAI 327 Digital Media I or
  DAI 324  Communications/Presentations
DAI 320 Drafting and Sketching for Design or
  DAI 424  Rapid Visualization
Units selected from the following: 6
  DAI 321 Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting  
  DAI 332 Electric Energy
  DAI 342 Metals Manufacturing Technology I
  DAI 344 Plastics Technology I
  DAI 326 Graphic Reproduction Technology I
  DAI 325 Graphic Design I
Total for core 21
Technical Emphasis
Units selected with approval of Design and Industry adviser (12 units must be DAI)
24
Total for major 45

Bachelor of Arts in Industrial Arts: Concentration in Product Design and Development

The concentration provides the most focused study of design within the DAI Department and deals with the proliferation of industrial goods and services. The concentration is interdisciplinary, incorporating the study of the nature and processing of materials, marketing, and aesthetics. The design concentration prepares students for work throughout industry where change is structured. Design consultancies, operations, research and development, community planning, and design research are examples of career areas for design students.

Prerequisites Units
PHYS 101 Conceptual Physics 3
PHYS 102 Conceptual Physics Laboratory 1
ACCT 300 Accounting and Finance Reporting 3
ECON 305 Economic Analysis for Non-majors 3
Total for prerequisites 10
MKTG 431 Marketing 3
Core Requirements (listed under B.A. program) 21
Concentration
DAI 356 History of Design/Technology 3
DAI 321 Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting 3
DAI 342 Metals Manufacturing Technology I 3
DAI 344 Plastics Technology I 3
DAI 320 Drafting and Sketching for Design or 3
  DAI 424   Rapid Visualization
DAI 406 Model Development Laboratory 3
DAI 400 Product Design and Development 3
Total for concentration 21
Total for major 55

NOTE: Courses taken to fulfill core requirements may be substituted with other courses by advisement.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology (BSIT) offers a management-oriented technical curricula built upon a program of studies drawn from DAI, Decision Sciences, Information Systems, Mathematics, and Management. This degree prepares students for leadership across a broad variety of technical industries.

On-line course descriptions are available.

Mathematics and Science
DS 110 Mathematical Analysis for Business or 3
  MATH 110   Business Calculus
DS 212 Business Statistics or 3
  MATH 124   Elementary Statistics
CHEM 101 Survey of Chemistry 3
CHEM 102 Survey of Chemistry Laboratory 1
PHYS 101 Conceptual Physics 3
PHYS 102 Conceptual Physics Laboratory 1
Total mathematics and science sequence 14
Business Management
ACCT 300 Accounting and Finance Reporting 3
ECON 305 Economic Analysis for Non-majors 3
MGMT 405 Introduction to Management and Organizational Behavior 3
MGMT 610 Human Resource Management 3
Total business management sequence 12
Total basic requirements 26
Core Requirements
In addition to the basic requirements and foundation courses, a professional emphasis is required of all students. NOTE: the departmental colloquium must be taken during the first semester of attendance in Design and Industry.
Foundation Courses
DAI 210 Industrial Science 3
DAI 300 Design I 3
DAI 320 Drafting and Sketching for Design or 3
  DAI 321   Introduction to Computer-aided Drafting
DAI 324 Communications/Presentations 3
DAI 370 Colloquium 3
DAI 510 Industrial Quality Control 2
DAI 505 Research and Development Laboratory 3
Total core requirements 20
Professional Emphasis (see below) 17-18
Total for major 63-64
Professional Emphases
Each student completes course work in one professional emphasis.
Product Development and Manufacturing Technology
DAI 110 The Arts of Industry 3
DAI 332 Electric Energy 3
DAI 342 Metals Manufacturing Technology 3
DAI 344 Plastics Technology I 3
DAI 400 Design II 3
DAI 460 Automated Manufacturing Systems 2
Total for emphasis 17
Graphic Communication
DAI 322 Computer Graphic Imaging 3
DAI 325 Graphic Design I 3
DAI 326 Graphic Reproduction Technology I 3
DAI 327 Digital Media I: Introduction 3
Units selected on advisement 6
Total for emphasis 18
Electronics Technology
DAI 332 Electric Energy 3
DAI 430 Industrial Controls 3
DAI 432 Electronics I 3
DAI 532 Applied Digital Electronics 3
Units selected on advisement 6
Total for emphasis 18

MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS

A minor in Design and Industry consists of 24 units that are largely chosen with an adviser to tailor the minor to the student's goals. One half of the course work for the minor must be taken at the upper division level.

Program Units
DAI 110 The Arts of Industry 3
DAI 327 Digital Media I: Introduction 3
One of the following courses with consent of adviser: 3
  DAI 210 Industrial Science  
  DAI 300 Design I
DAI 370 Colloquium 3
Courses selected with approval of DAI adviser 12
Total for minor 24

MASTER OF ARTS IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS

Graduate Advisers—Catanese, Chen, Cheng, Edwards, Gomes, Iandoli, Kelch, Linder, Veeder

The department offers the Master of Arts in Industrial Arts. This curriculum provides students with the opportunity to:

This program is designed for students who want to:

Students pursuing this program come from a variety of occupational areas including: education, service occupations, manufacturing, product design, visual communication design, management, electronics, construction, power and energy, and small business entrepreneurship. Employment opportunities include preparation for career advancement/enhancement through advanced study in design and related disciplines, acquisition of additional technical skills, and continued research and development activity.

Admission to Program

The application process to the DAI graduate program is a dual application process. One application for the university and a second application for the department. The DAI Graduate Application for the Design and Industry Department requires the submission of a statement of purpose; resumé; three letters of recommendation; and a portfolio, evidence of creative work, technical work, or written work.

Students entering this program normally present an undergraduate major in design, engineering, fine arts, industrial arts, or industrial technology subject major. The department does accept students with other undergraduate majors in cases where students desire to make career changes and/or wish to do advanced study in design or technology related subject matter for enhancing career development and professional growth. For non-majors, a minimum of twelve additional units are required by advisement encompassing such areas as design; visual communications design; graphic design; and basic tools, materials, processes knowledge and skills. For a copy of the Design and Industry Department Graduate Student Information Form write or call the Department of Design and Industry Office.

Advancement to Candidacy

A student is advanced to candidacy for a degree when the Graduate Approved Program (GAP) is accepted and approved by the dean of Graduate Studies. All conditions placed on conditionally classified status must be satisfied before a student develops a GAP. It should be filed in the semester immediately preceding registration for the final six units of graduate work. It is the student's responsibility to monitor his/her own progress and to work with appropriate department advisers filling out appropriate university forms as necessary and meeting published deadlines.

Written English Proficiency Requirement

As stated in the Graduate Studies section of the university Bulletin, each graduate student must demonstrate the ability to write American English correctly and effectively. Following university policy, the Design and Industry Department has two levels of assessment.

Level One: Students must complete a department approved essay examination; students who demonstrate by examination that they need additional work writing American English will be referred to appropriate resources on campus and additional course work in the English area will be added to their Graduate Approved Program unit total upon consultation and in coordination with the DAI department graduate coordinator. Level Two: Students can meet this requirement by the successful completion of the written phase of the culminating experience work that is part of either the Creative Work Project (DAI 894), or the Master's Thesis (DAI 898).

NOTE: It is the Department of Design and Industry's policy that a student must have a comprehensive written proposal approved at the department level within one semester prior to enrolling in either DAI 894, Creative Work Project, or DAI 898, Master's Thesis.

On-line course descriptions are available. Upper division courses may be selected with prior approval of the graduate adviser.

Program Requirements Units
DAI 700 Introduction to Graduate Study 3
Units selected from the following graduate courses as approved by the graduate adviser: 12
  DAI 705 Seminar in Industrial Technology  
  DAI 750 Seminar in Industrial Education
  DAI 752 Selected Problems in Industrial Education
  DAI 755 Design Seminar in Project Management
  DAI 800 Seminar in Design
  DAI 805 Seminar in Industrial Design Practices [topic course]
  DAI 805 Seminar in Graphic Communication [topic course]
  DAI 852 Directed Experience in Design and Industry
One of the following: 3
  DAI 894 Creative Work Project  
  DAI 898 Master's Thesis
Supporting upper division/graduate courses as approved by graduate major adviser 12
Minimum total 30



SFSU Home   Search   Need Help?  

1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (415) 338-1111

Last modified July 05, 2012 by bulletin@sfsu.edu