GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS IN BUSINESS


Undergraduate Programs in Business Administration
Minor Programs in Business Administration

General Information

The College of Business offers a variety of programs at the graduate level, thereby providing diverse paths to achieving high quality in management education. Most students opt for one of the general Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) programs, but some prefer a more specialized and focused master of science (M.S.) program.

Accelerated M.B.A. This is a fixed curriculum, cohort program offered off-campus for working professionals. The General Guidelines later in this section do not apply; instead, refer to the specific program description that follows the General Guidelines section below.

Alliance M.B.A. This is a flexible off-campus program that is delivered directly to workplaces anywhere in the world, using some combination of two-way audio-video teleconferencing and Alliance faculty traveling to the workplace. The courses are intensive, with three-unit courses delivered over a six week period, and four-unit courses over eight weeks. The General Guidelines later in this section do not apply; instead, refer to the specific program description that follows the General Guidelines section below.

M.B.A. This is the flagship graduate business degree program that most students select. Courses are offered on campus and at the Downtown Center, and the program is designed to accommodate needs of either full-time students or those who have other commitments. The program allows for limited specialization in any of several functional areas of emphasis.

M.S.B.A. The program allows for more flexibility in developing a personalized curriculum, and permits substantial specialization in a particular functional area or cross-disciplinary studies. Courses for this program are offered on the main campus, both day and evening.

Admission to Programs

U.S. citizens and permanent residents are accepted for both fall and spring admission according to the following schedule.

International students are accepted for both fall and spring admission.

The above dates are subject to change. Check with the Graduate Studies for the latest dates.

Prospective applicants judged to be of exceptionally high potential, especially those with extensive business experience, may be considered and processed on an exception basis beyond the dates indicated. Admission of these late applicants, however, may be contingent on time limitations and the enrollment may be restricted by space availability in the courses that will be offered in the forthcoming semester. The College of Business Graduate Studies Office should be contacted (415/338-1279) for information about current enrollment conditions.

Each applicant must submit the following to the Director of Graduate Studies in Business:

The College of Business utilizes an entry index of 1100 based on a combination of undergraduate grade point average, which must exceed 2.7 (last 60 semester units or last 90 quarter units), and the GMAT test score. The index is computed as 200 times the grade point average earned in the last 60 semester units of graded course work (based on A = 4), plus the GMAT score. While normally the minimally acceptable GMAT score is 470, the average score of students who are accepted is in excess of 530. The verbal and quantitative portions of the GMAT will be evaluated separately as well as in combination, and a student must earn at least a 20% score in both verbal and quantitative sections to be considered for automatic admission. The selection committee also will consider evidence of unusual motivation, career maturity, and past success in making admission judgments.

NOTE: Enrollment in graduate courses in Business (700-899) is limited to classified graduate business students and, with second priority, classified graduate students in other colleges.

Enrollment in BUS 890 and BUS 895 is limited to classified graduate students in business only.

Open University students, unclassified graduate students, and undergraduate students are only allowed to enroll in College of Business graduate courses with written permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

Grading Policy

Phase II courses must be taken on a basis of A, B, C, D, F grading. At the instructor's discretion, pluses and minuses may be used. CR/NC grading is not allowed, except in cases of credit by examination.

Phase III courses must be taken on a basis of A, B, C, D, F grading. At the instructor's discretion, pluses and minuses may be used. CR/NC grading is not allowed.

Grade Deficiency

In the College of Business, if a classified graduate business student drops below a 3.0 grade point average during a semester, s/he will be notified on the grade report by the Registrar's Office that s/he has been placed on probation. If the grade point deficiency is not made up, the student may be declassified effective the beginning of the semester following the first probationary semester. In such status, the student will not be allowed to enroll in graduate level business courses (700 and 800 level).

Any student who becomes declassified under the above provisions and who wishes to appeal such declassification must file a formal appeal within ten days of the date of notice of declassification. Such appeal must be filed with the Director of Graduate Studies of the College of Business.

Generally, the specified course requirements, including stipulated conditions thereto, for the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) may not be changed, substituted for, or altered in any way. Any exceptions to this rule must be requested, in writing, before the course work is attempted and must be approved by the Graduate Committee of the College of Business.

General Guidelines

All students planning to complete a master's degree through the College of Business must complete on advisement the applicable requirements as specified in Phases I, II, and III below. Phase I represents proficiency requirements which must be satisfied early in the student's study in a graduate program in business. Phase II represents foundation course work which will be planned on advisement in accordance with the guidelines provided below. The number and type of courses prescribed for a student in Phase II will be determined on the basis of the student's degree objective, academic background, professional experience, and planned focus within the selected degree program. Phase III represents the advanced program that all students will be required to complete.

Phase I—Proficiency Requirements

Written English Proficiency. Level One: all incoming M.B.A./M.S.B.A. candidates are required to satisfy the entry-level written English proficiency requirement by a satisfactory score on the GMAT Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA), a satisfactory score on the Graduate Essay Test (GET), or successful completion of BUS 514 by the end of the second semester in the program. Level Two: demonstration of a higher level of English proficiency than the required entry level. The students should then be able to demonstrate ability to do scholarly writing in the chosen field. This is normally shown by satisfactory completion of the research project or the master's thesis.

Mathematics/Statistics Proficiency. All students entering the graduate program in business must demonstrate a basic proficiency in mathematics and statistics, by passing mathematics and statistics tests given at various times during the year or by successfully completing DS 510 and 512, respectively. This proficiency must be demonstrated before enrolling in any 800-level courses or by the end of the second semester in the program, whichever comes first.

Phase II—Foundation Requirements

Depending upon a student's previous academic background, the Phase II program may range from 0 to 24 units for the M.B.A. and 0 to 27 units for the M.S.B.A. The foundation requirements are met by taking the eight business foundation courses or by waivers of individual courses based on previous equivalent course work. Each equivalency will be determined by course content, grade received, elapsed time since work was completed, and supporting experience.

Business Foundation Courses for M.B.A. and M.S.B.A.
BUS 781 Financial and Managerial Accounting
BUS 782 Computer Applications and Information Systems for Management
BUS 783 Economics for Managers
BUS 784 The Political, Social, and Legal Environment of Business
BUS 785 Financial Management
BUS 786 Operation Analysis
BUS 787 Marketing Management and Multinational Operations
BUS 788 Management Principles and Organizational Behavior

For M.S.B.A. only, BUS 690 is required if BUS 890 is not taken as a part of the graduate program.

Phase III—Advanced Program Requirements

Advancement to Candidacy

Before being considered for advancement to candidacy the applicant must meet all general university requirements, satisfy all foundation requirements, be certified in written English proficiency (Level One), and complete at least six units in College of Business courses in the 800 series.

When requirements have been satisfied, the graduate adviser and the director of Graduate Studies in Business may recommend to the Dean of the Division of Graduate Studies that the applicant be advanced to candidacy for the degree by filing a Graduate Approved Program.

ACCELERATED MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (AMBA) PROGRAM

Joseph M. Messina, Director
Accelerated MBA Program, College of Business
(415) 405-3692
E-mail: amba@sfsu.edu

Faculty: Baack, L., Baack, S., Dopp, Elimam, Ericson, Gaglio, McCline, Messina, Nicholson, Purser, O'Shaughnessy, Sengupta, Sayeed, Wong

The Accelerated MBA (AMBA) is a fixed curriculum, cohort program designed to accelerate careers of mid-level managers into executive management. Typically, classes meet off-campus at a Bay Area corporate site and students complete all degree requirements within two years.

Admission Requirements. Formal admission requirements are similar to those for the on-campus MBA and MSBA programs. Each cohort is comprised of fully employed professionals from all functional areas of business, who typically have at least five years of experience and have demonstrated a pattern of increased responsibility throughout their professional careers. Students need not have had previous course work in business.

Cost. Tuition and fees are consistent with the SFSU requirement that all off-campus programs be self-supporting. Contact the AMBA office for current tuition and fees.

Location. Class meetings are held off-campus, at sites throughout the Bay Area.

Curriculum. The core curriculum balances the art and science of management so the student not only understands theoretical issues, but also learns to apply the theory in diverse management situations. The foundation courses of accounting, economics, and statistics are efficiently integrated with the functional areas of finance, marketing, organizational behavior and design, and computer information systems to accelerate the student's progress through the program. Case studies of actual business situations and guest speakers with specialized expertise are an important part of the curriculum. Specialized courses are selected by the faculty to meet the specific objectives of mid-career professionals. These courses emphasize leadership, cross-functional analysis, teamwork, and current issues in executive management such as electronic commerce. Each class member is expected to complete a research project (BUS 895) that identifies a current problem in the individual's firm or industry, examines alternatives, and recommends a course of action.

The courses that comprise the program are listed below. All courses are three semester units unless otherwise noted in parentheses.

Foundation Courses
BUS 881 Financial and Managerial Accounting (4)
BUS 883 Economics and Quantitative Analysis for Managers (4)
BUS 884 The Political, Social, and Legal Environment of Business (2)
BUS 886 Statistics and Operations Analysis (4)
Graduate Approved Program (GAP) Courses
BUS 882 Advanced Computing Applications and Information Systems for Management (4)
BUS 885 Corporate Financial Management (4)
BUS 887 Strategic Marketing Management (4)
BUS 888 Organizational Behavior, Design, and Change (4)
BUS 890 Seminar in Strategic Management
BUS 895 Research Project in Business
and 4 specialized courses selected by AMBA faculty for each cohort

Accreditation. Along with the on-campus MBA and MSBA programs, the AMBA is accredited by AACSB International, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. SFSU is accredited by WASC, Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

ALLIANCE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (ALLIANCE MBA) PROGRAM

Joseph M. Messina, Director
Alliance MBA Program, College of Business
(415) 338-6348
E-mail: allmba@sfsu.edu

Faculty: L. Baack (SFSU), S. Baack (SFSU), Boykin (CSU Chico), Castaldi (SFSU), Dopp (SFSU), Elimam (SFSU), Ericson (SFSU), Gaglio (SFSU), Gill (SFSU), McCline (SFSU), Messina (SFSU), Nicholson (SFSU), Purser (SFSU), Perttula (SFSU), O'Shaughnessy (SFSU), Sayeed (SFSU), Sengupta (SFSU), Stockman (CSU Sacramento), Toy (CSU Chico), Wong (SFSU)

The Alliance MBA program allows working professionals with no prior business course work to earn an MBA within 24 months. The entire program is delivered directly to one's place of business using either two-way audio-video teleconferencing, Alliance faculty traveling to the corporate site, or some combination of the two. Corporations, government organizations, and educational groups should contact the Alliance MBA office to discuss customized programs to meet their needs.

Cost. Tuition and fees are consistent with the SFSU requirement that all off-campus programs be self-supporting. For current tuition and fees, contact the Alliance MBA office.

Location. Class meetings are held off-campus at corporate sites. Specialized courses for the first cohort are in information technology and e-commerce marketing.

Alliance Faculty. Faculty are selected from CSU campuses that are members of the MBA Alliance.

Curriculum. The core curriculum balances the art and science of management so the student not only understands theoretical issues, but also learns to apply the theory in diverse management situations. The foundation courses of accounting, economics, and statistics are efficiently integrated with the functional areas of finance, marketing, organizational behavior and design, and management information systems to accelerate the student's progress through the program. Case studies of actual business situations and guest speakers with specialized expertise are an important part of the curriculum.

Specialized courses are selected by the faculty to meet the specific objectives of mid-career professionals. These courses emphasize leadership, cross-functional analysis, teamwork, and current issues in executive management such as electronic commerce.

The courses that comprise the program are listed below. All courses are three semester units unless otherwise noted in parentheses.

DS 512

Business Statistics

BUS 881

Financial and Managerial Accounting (4)

BUS 882

Advanced Computing Applications and Information Systems for Management (4)

BUS 783

Economics for Managers

BUS 784

The Political, Social, and Legal Environment of Business

BUS 885

Corporate Financial Management (4)

BUS 786

Operations Analysis

BUS 887

Strategic Marketing Management (4)

BUS 888

Organizational Behavior, Design, and Change (4)

BUS 890

Seminar in Strategic Management

BUS 895

Research Project in Business

In addition to the eleven required courses, the Alliance faculty selects four specialized courses for each cohort.

Course Delivery Methods

Course duration is determined by the needs of corporate Alliance partners. Three-unit courses are typically 3.15 hours per week for twelve weeks or 6.3 hours per week for six weeks, but other configurations are possible. Four-unit courses are typically 6.25 hours per week for eight weeks or 3.33 hours per week for fifteen weeks, but other configurations are possible.

Teleconferencing Delivery

Some courses may be delivered using two-way audio-video teleconferencing. These lectures typically are delivered six hours per week from the teleconferencing centers of one of the Alliance campuses. Students receive the lectures at their corporate site.

On-site Delivery

Some courses may be delivered by Alliance faculty going to the corporate site. On-site courses typically employ the following formats:

Three-unit courses

Four-unit courses

Other course delivery configurations as well as the mix of teleconferencing and on-site lectures is dependent on the needs of specific Alliance corporate partners.

Accreditation. Along with the on-campus MBA and MSBA programs, the Alliance MBA is accredited by the AACSB, The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. San Francisco State University is accredited by WASC, The Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

General Information

This program is designed as a balanced preparation for managerial careers in business. Its purposes are to prepare students for responsible positions in a rapidly changing world; to develop an attitude of intellectual curiosity to foster a program of continuous learning throughout life; to assist students in their recognition and development of the initiative, imagination, and creativity needed for effective functioning as managers in a complex environment; and to study management as a unique function applicable to all types of endeavors which involve the coordination of people and material resources toward given objectives. The Master of Business Administration is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

On-line course descriptions are available.

Program Units
DS/ISYS 814 Seminar in Advanced Computing Applications for Management 3
FIN 819 Financial Analysis and Management 3
MGMT 842 Seminar in Organization Design and Change 3
MKTG 860 Seminar in Strategic Marketing 3
Adviser-approved elective (any 800-level course offered by the College of Business) 3
Electives in field of specialization (all must be 800-level courses offered by the College of Business) 9
BUS 890 Seminar in Strategic Management 3
BUS 895 Research Project in Business 3
Graduate Approved Program (GAP) total  7 30
Phase II Requirements 0-24
  Total 30-54

Accounting Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Franz, McWilliams, Naser-Tavakolian

The primary objective of this limited specialization is to provide broad-based knowledge in accounting especially directed to managerial positions in the accounting profession and business organizations. The specialization and elective graduate courses, all at the 800 level, should be selected upon advisement from the graduate course listing for the College of Business.

Graduate-level accounting courses for the M.B.A. program may be selected from 800-level accounting courses. ACCT 800 and 801 may not be taken for credit.

Decision Sciences/Operations Research Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Cholette, Elimam, Özlük, Saltzman, Udayabhanu

The decision sciences/operations research emphasis covers techniques used in forecasting, simulation, data analysis, operations research, and quality and productivity, along with other powerful quantitative and computer-based tools for analyzing business problems. All the courses focus on real-world applications rather than on abstract theory.

All graduate decision sciences students must consult a Decision Sciences graduate adviser before taking Phase III specialization courses for the M.B.A. degree.

In addition to the Phase III eighteen (18) units prescribed for this degree, students desiring a limited specialization in decision sciences should take one adviser approved elective and three courses from the following group, of which at least two should have a DS prefix: DS 811, DS 816, DS 851, DS 852, DS 853, DS 854, FIN 820, FIN 822, MKTG 864. Other graduate-level courses may be taken with prior written adviser approval.

Electronic Commerce Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Bhimjee, Gill, Henley, Lowe, Messina, Nickerson, Perttula, Sengupta

The electronic commerce technology emphasis provides students with an understanding of various aspects of electronic commerce in businesses and other organizations. Students may elect to take courses that cover the design and development of electronic commerce web sites, Internet marketing, electronic commerce project management, marketing strategy for electronic commerce, data communications for electronic commerce, multimedia application development, and other business aspects of electronic commerce.

Students desiring a limited specialization in electronic commerce must complete three electronic commerce-related courses at the 800-level in the College of Business with adviser approval.

Finance Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Chen, Messina

The primary objective of the program is to provide broad management perspective as well as in-depth analytical skills and conceptual background in the various aspects of domestic and international financial management and decision-making. The courses offered are aimed at understanding, analyzing, and improving managerial decision-making process in the fields of corporate finance, financial markets and institutions, investment and portfolio analysis, financial data analysis, and international finance.

The program is designed to prepare the students for employment positions in the field of finance, which require analytical skills and decision-making abilities. Students should carefully check prerequisites for all 800-series courses.

Every M.B.A. student desiring a limited specialization in finance must complete FIN 820, Seminar in Financial Management; FIN 825, Seminar in Investments; and one elective, on advisement, from the graduate course listing for finance.

Information Systems Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Bhimjee, Gill, Henley, Nickerson

The computer information systems emphasis offers a program in the development, use, management, and support of information systems in businesses and other organizations.

Students desiring a limited specialization in computer information systems complete ISYS 812, or the equivalent, and two (three if the ISYS 812 requirement is satisfied by equivalency) of the following courses: ISYS 862, 863, 864, 865, 868, 871.

International Business Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Evans, Lee, Nicholson, Wong

The program is designed to prepare individuals to assume managerial responsibilities in international business, to perform in a responsive and responsible way in the multinational environment, and to contribute to economic development and international understanding through investment, production, and trade.

The M.B.A. is a broadly based, highly structured, and widely recognized degree designed for the individual seeking greater managerial responsibility across the broad spectrum of business and government operations.

Specialized international business courses are found in the listings for accounting, finance, management, marketing, and transportation as well as those for international business. They include ACCT 808, FIN 835 and 836; IBUS 815, 830, 855, 857, 859, 879, 881, 890, 895, and 898; and MKTG 880 at the graduate level.

Limited specialization and elective courses, all at the 800-level, are selected with the adviser's approval from the College of Business listings.

Management Studies Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Albert, Baack, S., Castaldi, Dopp, Ericson, Gaglio, Glenn, Harrison, Jenner, McCline, Purser, Silverman, Staley, Sullivan

The specialization in management and organization provides the student with detailed knowledge of managerial functions, concepts and practices of organization design and behavior required for decision making in a wide range of managerial positions. The specialization in human resource management is designed to prepare individuals for work in personnel departments of business or governmental agencies, or for other positions in the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, The National Labor Relations Board, and similar agencies.

The specialization in entrepreneurial/small business management is designed to provide the student with the concepts, skills, and attitudes necessary to start and manage a small business. The program focuses on new venture creation, business planning, innovation, and the foundations for small business management.

Limited specialization and elective graduate courses, all at the 800 level, must be approved in advance, in writing, by the graduate adviser.

Marketing Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Appell, Beall, Bhat, Bushman, Ho, Hussain, Im, Lowe, O’Donnell, Perttula, Robertson, Sengupta, Strebel, Wardlow

The program prepares a student for career opportunities in business firms, non-profit organizations, or governmental agencies. The combination of graduate work and specific job experience can lead to staff or line positions in general marketing, sales, Internet marketing, advertising, new product development, retail management, and marketing research.

Limited specialization and elective graduate courses, all at the 800 level, should be selected, upon advisement, from the graduate course listing for the College of Business.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

General Information

This degree is intended for students who desire a more individually designed program in business for eventual careers in business, government, trade associations, or the business functions of other agencies. It permits substantial specialization in a particular functional area or cross-disciplinary studies.

The Master of Science in Business Administration is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

Students in the M.S.B.A. program must follow the Phase I, II, and III requirements listed under the general guidelines in the Graduate Degree Programs in Business section.

Program Units
BUS 898 Master's Thesis8 3
Courses offered by the College of Business reserved exclusively for graduate students (800-level courses) 15
Courses offered by the College of Business and/or in allied fields, as approved by graduate major adviser 12
Graduate Approved Program (GAP) total 30
Phase II Requirements (including BUS 690, if needed) 0-27
  Total 30-57

Limitations:

  1. Up to six of the units may be upper-division undergraduate courses with the approval of the graduate major adviser and the College of Business graduate director.
  2. In unusual cases, to meet unique needs, up to twelve of the units may be upper-division undergraduate courses provided that the GAP containing more than six such units is approved by the College of Business Graduate Committee prior to the filing of the GAP.
  3. In no instance may the GAP contain undergraduate courses that are:
    1. lower-division undergraduate courses;
    2. business core courses;
    3. courses where an equivalent 800-level course is available.

Accounting Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Franz, McWilliams, Naser-Tavakolian

This program provides an opportunity for students to specialize more extensively in accounting, including financial accounting, auditing, managerial accounting, taxation, and accounting information systems. In addition to BUS 898 (3 units), at least fifteen units of 800-level graduate accounting courses must be completed. The remaining twelve units may be selected from appropriate graduate and undergraduate courses. The course selection must be approved by an adviser. ACCT 800 and 801 may not be taken for credit if ACCT 301 and 302, or the equivalents, have been completed.

Decision Sciences/Operations Research Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Cholette, Elimam, Özlük, Udayabhanu

The decision sciences/operations research emphasis covers techniques used in forecasting, simulation, data analysis, operations research, and quality and productivity, along with other powerful quantitative and computer-based tools for analyzing business problems. All the courses focus on real-world applications rather than on abstract theory. Students also have the option of taking courses that are tied to manufacturing and service operations in public and private organizations.

Designed for students who want to develop a strong specialization in areas requiring analytical thinking and superior problem-solving skills. A background in basic mathematics through calculus is desirable. In addition to the three units prescribed for this degree (BUS 898), students desiring this specialization must take DS 811 and DS/ISYS 814, at least three courses with a DS prefix from the following group, and with prior adviser approval, twelve (12) units of electives constituting an integrated specialization: DS 816, DS 851, DS 852, DS 853, DS 854.

Electronic Commerce Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Bhimjee, Gill, Henley, Nickerson, Sayeed

The electronic commerce emphasis provides students with an understanding of the planning, development, and management of electronic commerce applications. Core courses in the emphasis cover: design and development of electronic commerce websites, data communications, and network technology; management of electronic commerce projects; and marketing concepts related to electronic commerce. Elective courses allow students to pursue selected technical or non-technical topics in greater depth.

The emphasis includes eight required courses and two elective courses. The required courses are: ISYS/DS 814, ISYS 871, 865, 864, MKTG 869, MKTG 860 or FIN 819 or MGMT 842, BUS 890, ISYS 895 or BUS 898. The two elective courses must be selected with adviser approval.

Finance Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Chen, Messina

The primary objective of the program is to provide broad management perspective as well as in-depth analytical skills and conceptual background in the various aspects of domestic and international financial management and decision-making. The courses offered are aimed at understanding, analyzing, and improving managerial decision-making process in the fields of corporate finance, financial markets and institutions, investment and portfolio analysis, financial data analysis, and international finance.

The program is designed to prepare the students for employment positions in the field of finance, which require analytical skills and decision-making abilities.

Students should carefully check prerequisites for all 800-series courses.

At least fifteen (15) units of graduate finance courses in the 800 series beyond FIN 819 (minimum grade of B–) and BUS 898 (Master's Thesis) must be selected with the consent of an adviser. Students must have an adviser-approved program before attempting any 800-level course work.

Information Systems Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Bhimjee, Gill, Henley, Nickerson, Sayeed

The information systems emphasis offers a program in the development, use, management, and support of information systems in businesses and other organizations.

Students desiring a limited specialization in information systems complete ISYS 812 or the equivalent, and two (three, if ISYS 812 is satisfied by equivalency) of the following courses: ISYS 862, 863, 864, 865, 868, 871.

International Business Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Evans, Lee, Nicholson, Wong

The program is designed to prepare individuals to assume managerial responsibilities in international business, to perform in a responsive and responsible way in the multinational environment, and to contribute to economic development and international understanding through investment, production, and trade. The M.S.B.A. provides an opportunity for greater specialization in international operations and functions.

Specialized international business courses are found in the listings for accounting, finance, management, and marketing as well as those for international business. They include ACCT 808; FIN 835 and 836; IBUS 815, 830, 855, 857, 859, 879, 881, 890, 895, and 898; and MKTG 880 at the graduate level.

With an adviser's approval, the student selects courses from the 800-series in the College of Business, and supporting graduate and upper-division courses from appropriate colleges to provide: (1) a functional emphasis; (2) a functional or regional emphasis including language; or (3) a program tailored to the individual needs and objectives of the student.

Management Studies Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Albert, Baack, S., Castaldi, Dopp, Ericson, Gaglio, Glenn, Harrison, Jenner, McCline, Purser, Silverman, Staley, Sullivan

The specialization in management and organization provides the student with detailed knowledge of managerial functions, concepts, and practices; and of organization design and behavior required for decision making in a wide range of managerial positions. The specialization in human resource management (HRM) is designed to prepare individuals for work in personnel departments of business or governmental agencies, or for other positions in the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, The National Labor Relations Board, and similar agencies.

The specialization in entrepreneurial/small business management is designed to provide the student with the concepts, skills, and attitudes necessary to start and manage a small business. The program focuses on new venture creation, business planning, innovation, and the foundations for small business management.

At least fifteen (15) units of graduate courses in the 800 series beyond the three units required (BUS 898) should be selected, upon advisement, from the graduate courses listed for the College of Business. All selections must be approved in advance, in writing, by the graduate adviser. Special emphases are available in management, industrial relations, productivity improvement, and human resource management.

Marketing Emphasis

Graduate Advisers—Appell, Beall, Bhat, Bushman, Ho, Hussain, Im, Lowe, O’Donnell, Perttula, Robertson, Sengupta, Strebel, Wardlow

The program prepares a student for career opportunities in business firms, non-profit organizations, or governmental agencies. The combination of graduate work and specific job experience can lead to staff or line positions in general marketing, sales, Internet marketing, advertising, new product development, retail management, and marketing research.

Every student with an emphasis in marketing must complete MKTG 860, MKTG 861, and MKTG 864. At least six  units from the following must be completed: MKTG 862, MKTG 865, MKTG 867, MKTG 868, and MKTG 869. At least six additional units in 800-level courses offered by the College of Business must be selected upon advisement.


Undergraduate Programs in Business Administration
Minor Programs in Business Administration


Footnotes

  1. Students enrolling in DS 110 must satisfy the university entry-level mathematics requirements (see the General Education, Segment I section of this Bulletin).
  2. ACCT 100 and ACCT 101 may be substituted for ACCT 300, on advisement.
  3. MATH 250 is an equivalent to DS 212; prerequisite mathematics capability may be satisfied by DS 110 or MATH 110.
  4. ECON 100 and 101 may be substituted for ECON 305, on advisement.
  5. ACCT 301 and 302 may be substituted for ACCT 303, on advisement.
  6. The BUS 360 prerequisite will be waived for business minors.
  7. In order to meet the breadth requirements of the AACSB no more than twelve (12) units with a common prefix in the Phase III Advanced Program may be taken unless the student has completed a capstone business policy course (BUS 690 or equivalent) in prior work or in addition to other required graduate work in the program. If a capstone policy course has been completed, the maximum number or units with a common prefix is fifteen.
  8. For the M.S.B.A. program with a limited specialization in international business, IBUS 895 may be taken in lieu of BUS 898; for the limited specialization in information systems and decision sciences/operations research, ISYS 895 may be taken in lieu of BUS 898; for the limited specialization in accounting, ACCT 895 may be taken in lieu of BUS 898.


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