Foreign Languages and Literatures  {SF State Bulletin 2013 - 2014}

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Foreign Languages and Literatures

College of Liberal & Creative Arts

Dean: Paul Sherwin

 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HUM 475
Phone: 415-338-1421
Web Site: www.sfsu.edu/~foreign
Chair: Mohammad Salama

 

Programs

B.A. in Chinese: Concentration in Chinese Language

B.A. in Chinese: Concentration in Chinese Literature and Linguistics

B.A. in Chinese: Concentration in Flagship Chinese Language

B.A. in French

B.A. in German

B.A. in Italian

B.A. in Japanese

B.A. in Spanish

Minor in Chinese Language

Minor in Chinese Literature and Language

Minor in French

Minor in German

Minor in Italian

Minor in Japanese

Minor in Persian Studies

Minor in Russian

Minor in Spanish

M.A. in Chinese

M.A. in French

M.A. in German

M.A. in Italian

M.A. in Japanese

M.A. in Spanish

 


 

Program Scope

Bachelor of Arts

The Department of Foreign Languages offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish. The department also offers a minor in these languages and a minor in Russian. Programs are designed for students who are planning to use foreign languages in professional careers, as well as for students who wish to acquire an appreciation of the cultures of other peoples. Students may select courses in language, conversation, composition, reading, linguistics, culture, and literature. Some of the programs offer courses in business and translating skills, and literature and culture courses in English.

 

Students who have had foreign language experience before enrolling at San Francisco State University should consult with an advisor in the specific language program for placement in the proper course in which they can receive credit.

 

A multimedia foreign language laboratory is open to all students enrolled in any class in the department. Basic level courses usually require preparation using audio and video cassettes, CD roms, DVDs, laser discs, and computer programs, located in the multimedia language laboratory.

 

Major. The Bachelor of Arts requirements for a major in any foreign language are the same for all students, including credential candidates. It is suggested that students intending to major in a foreign language consult with an advisor in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures early enough to assure proper scheduling of essential courses.

 

Minor. For students who wish to take a minor in a foreign language, the requirements for all seven languages are 21 units. The first two years of language instruction (lower division courses) are preparatory courses. A few lower division courses may be applied to the minor but must be approved upon consultation with an advisor. For the specific upper division courses required for completion of the minor, consult the individual language program.

 

Upper division courses in the foreign language programs are, in general, conducted in the language under study.

 

Master of Arts

The department offers the Master of Arts in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish. The various master's programs provide advanced instruction in culture, language, and literature. A limited number of graduate teaching assistant positions are available for students engaged in graduate study in the programs. The M.A. programs are designed to prepare students for a variety of careers. M.A. graduates often become teachers in private or public secondary schools, in community colleges, or after completing doctoral studies, in universities.

 

Admission to Programs

Students seeking admission to a master of arts program must have completed an undergraduate major comparable to the major in the appropriate language and literature at San Francisco State University.

 

Applicants without such a major may be admitted conditionally after developing, through consultation with advisors, a program of studies to establish the equivalent of that major. Courses prescribed for equivalency may not be credited toward the master of arts program.

 

Students in all Master of Arts programs are required to have a GPA of at least 3.0 in their undergraduate major.

 

Advancement to Candidacy

In addition to meeting all the university general requirements, students prior to advancement to candidacy must:

  • Meet all conditions required by the language of concentration.
  • Where required, complete with grade of A or B the course 700, Seminar in Research Methods.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in English by passing the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or appropriate courses recommended by specific foreign language graduate advisor. Units earned in these courses may not be applied toward the master's degree. Both native and non-native speakers of English must meet this requirement. Students must take the GRE, if required by the program, and have the results sent before beginning the first semester of graduate study.
  • Demonstrate oral and written proficiency in the language of concentration.

 

If students are unable to meet the above requirements for advancement to candidacy, they may be advised to enroll in additional courses prior to being considered for candidacy. In such cases the courses will not be credited toward the master's degree.

 

Demonstration of Exit-Level Language Proficiency

Professional level of proficiency in the language studied is demonstrated by satisfactory completion of written and oral comprehensive examinations.

 

Students interested in any of these programs are urged to contact the department office or the undergraduate or graduate advisor.

 

International Programs

For undergraduate majors or minors, the department recommends an overseas experience of academic and cultural studies. Students who participate in the International Programs of the California State University may undertake an academic year at certain designated major institutions of higher learning located outside the United States. All students in the overseas language programs should consult with an advisor in the specific language to ensure that courses taken abroad can be applied to the major, the minor, or the degree at San Francisco State University. For the Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish B.A. programs, 15 of the 30 upper-division units required for the major must be taken at the home campus. For the minor, 9 of the 15 to 18 upper-division units must be taken at the home campus. There may also be limits in the other language programs. For graduate students in the German and Italian M.A. programs, a maximum of 9 units from the CSU International Programs will be accepted for the degree. For graduate students in the Chinese, French, Japanese, and Spanish M.A. programs, a maximum of 12 units will be accepted for the degree.

 

Teaching Credentials

A bachelor of arts from San Francisco State University in French, German, Italian, or Japanese may be used to fulfill the subject matter requirement for a Single Subject Teaching Credential required to teach in the secondary schools in the State of California. A master of arts in any of these languages may be used to fulfill the state's requirement to teach that subject at the two-year community colleges.

 

Note: While the master's degree may qualify students to teach at the community college level, it will not qualify them to teach at the elementary or secondary levels. A single subject or multiple subject credential is necessary for such employment. (Refer to the section on Credential Programs in this Bulletin for further details.)

 

Students considering teaching a foreign language and obtaining a teaching credential must see the credential advisor in their language of concentration before planning their program. Specific courses and an assessment of competencies are required for admission to the Single Subject Teaching Credential Program. Students should also contact the Student Service Office in the College of Education, (415) 338-7038, regarding teaching credential information.

 

Special Courses

First and second year language courses in Arabic and upper-division literature and culture courses in Arabic and English translation are offered as well as first year courses in Filipino, Hindi, and Persian; first and third semester in the fall for Arabic, and first semester in the fall and second semester in the spring for Filipino.

 

Career Outlook

Some careers require a foreign language as a primary skill. For those employed in teaching foreign languages, culture and literature, and for those who work as interpreters and translators, a high degree of fluency or near-native competency is required. On the other hand, there are a great number of career alternatives open to people who possess good competency in one or more foreign languages. Local and state agencies as well as the federal government (such as the State Department, the Department of Defense, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Peace Corps) often have openings for people with language skills. Further employment possibilities are in multinational companies with significant global operations (international marketing and accounting firms, international banking, and other international business), advertising, journalism, publishing, communications, and information services, media and entertainment, travel and tourism, the hotel and restaurant industry, health care, as well as in the arts. Competency in one or more foreign languages will open the door to many exciting careers.

 

Foreign Languages and Literatures—Chinese

College of Liberal & Creative Arts

Dean: Paul Sherwin

 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HUM 475
Web Site: http://chinese.sfsu.edu
415-338-1421

Chair: Mohammad Salama
Program Coordinator: Chris Wen-chao Li
Undergraduate Advisers: Chris Wen-Chao Li, Charles Egan, Frederik Green
Graduate Adviser: Chris Wen-Chao Li
Flagship Program Director: Charles Egan
Flagship Program Assistant Director: Frederik Green

 

Faculty

Professors: Egan, Li
Assistant Professor: Green
Lecturers: Cheng, Liou, Tsao

 

Programs

B.A. in Chinese: Concentration in Chinese Language

B.A. in Chinese: Concentration in Chinese Literature & Linguistics

B.A. in Chinese: Concentration in Flagship Chinese Language

Minor in Chinese Language

Minor in Chinese Literature & Linguistics

M.A. in Chinese

 


 

Program Scope

Founded in 1959, the Chinese Program at San Francisco State University provides comprehensive degree programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. For all major and minor options, the Chinese Program offers electives taught in both English and Chinese which provide insight into one of the world’s oldest civilizations and inspire the student to view the modern world from alternative perspectives. Courses on modern literature and film, taught in Chinese, reflect the dynamic transformations of contemporary Chinese society and culture. Training in the fundamentals of linguistics complements program goals by revealing the underlying structures of language. To prepare students as fully as possible for future challenges, the Chinese Program balances traditional academic offerings with practical courses such as Business Chinese, Media Chinese, and Web Chinese, which equip students with career-related language skills.

 

The Bachelor of Arts in Chinese is divided into three separate concentrations: Chinese Language, designed for students with little or no background in Chinese language; Chinese Literature and Linguistics, aimed at native and near-native speakers of Chinese language; and Flagship Chinese Language, a federally funded honors program.

 

The Minor in Chinese Language is designed for beginning language learners, and is focused on the buildup of proficiency in the Modern Standard Language.

 

The Minor in Chinese Literature and Linguistics, is designed for native and near-native speakers, and requires coursework in advanced language, classical language, linguistics, literature, culture, and oratory.

 

The Master of Arts in Chinese provides advanced training in the areas of literature, linguistics and pedagogy, building a solid foundation for further study and language-related careers. Many of our M.A. graduates advance to study and research at the doctoral level, and others develop skills for China-related careers, including teaching Chinese as a second language, international business and law, and translation and interpretation.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Chinese

  • Student will satisfy University Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR) by taking one GWAR offering from the Chinese Program or Department of Foreign Languages. Current GWAR offerings include CHIN 601 GW, CHIN 612 GW and F L 400 GW.
  • Prior to submitting an application for graduation, candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree in Chinese must present evidence of having completed a Culminating Experience Project. The Culminating Experience Project can be completed through one of three options:
  1. Standardized Test:
    The student shall submit evidence of having passed the Hanyu Shuiping Kaoshi (HSK), the Test of Chinese as a Foreign Language (TOCFL), or the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) for Mandarin Chinese at the appropriate level. The following grade levels are treated as passing:
    • Hanyu Shuiping Kaoshi (HSK): Level 4 or higher
    • Test of Chinese as a Foreign Language (TOCFL): Level 3 or higher
    • Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI): Advanced low or higher
  2. Writing Portfolio:
    The student shall submit a writing portfolio with evidence of advanced level academic and/or professional writing in both Chinese and English. The portfolio must contain at least one work of Chinese language academic or professional writing developed out of a writing assignment submitted for credit in an upper division course taught in Chinese, and one work of English language academic or professional writing developed out of a writing assignment accepted for credit in a GWAR course.
  3. Flagship Capstone:
    The Flagship Capstone option is available only to students accepted into the Chinese Flagship Program. Students in the Chinese Flagship Program must choose the Flagship Capstone Option, which consists of a "Capstone Year" abroad, to be implemented once the student has reached proficiency benchmarks set by the Language Flagship and has been recommended by the Council of Chinese Flagship Directors. There are currently two supported Flagship "Capstone Year" programs. (1) Nanjing University Flagship Center, administered by Brigham Young University and the American Councils of International Education: one semester of study at Nanjing University followed by a four-month, full-time professional internship. (2) Tianjin Normal University Flagship Center: two semesters of study simultaneously with a part-time internship.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Chinese: Concentration In Chinese Language

See Chinese Bachelor of Arts introduction above

The Concentration in Chinese Language is designed for beginning language learners with little or no background in Chinese Language. The program places emphasis on the building of proficiency in Mandarin Chinese (putonghua/guoyu) and an appreciation and understanding of literature and culture.

 

Note: Native speakers of Chinese and international students who have completed secondary and/or tertiary education in Chinese language in a Chinese-speaking country are discouraged from choosing this concentration.

 

On-line course descriptions are available.

 

Program

Course Title Units
CHIN 101 First Semester Chinese [High school prerequisite*] 5
CHIN 102 Second Semester Chinese [High school prerequisite*] 5
CHIN 103 Third Semester Chinese 5
CHIN 303 Intermediate Chinese 5
CHIN 311 Conversation and Reading 3
CHIN 312 Speech and Writing 3
CHIN 401 Advanced Chinese 3
F L 325 Linguistics for Foreign Languages 3
CHIN 501 Introduction to Classical Chinese 3
CHIN 507 Traditional Chinese Culture 3
One of the following courses 3
CHIN 600 Topics in Chinese Language, Literature, and Culture in English  
CHIN 601 GW The Poetic Tradition - GWAR
CHIN 602 The Narrative Tradition in English
CHIN 611 The Revolutionary Tradition in Modern Chinese Literature
CHIN 612 GW Negotiating Chineseness in the Late 20th and 21st Centuries - GWAR
HUM 530 Chinese Civilization
GWAR course if not chosen from the 600 level courses above or upper division elective in Chinese or related area (upon advising) 3
Total Units 44

 

Bachelor of Arts in Chinese: Concentration in Chinese Literature and Linguistics

See Chinese Bachelor of Arts introduction above

The Concentration in Chinese Literature and Linguistics is aimed at native and near-native speakers of Chinese language, and consists of 18 units of required coursework in advanced language, linguistics, oratory, literature and culture, plus an additional 12 units of lower and upper division electives in Chinese or a related subject. GWAR is built into the course design.

 

Program

Course Title Units
CHIN 401 Advanced Chinese 3
F L 325 Linguistics for Foreign Languages 3
CHIN 501 Introduction to Classical Chinese 3
CHIN 507 Traditional Chinese Culture 3
CHIN 530 Oratory and Performance 3
One of the following courses 3
CHIN 600 Topics in Chinese Language, Literature, and Culture in English  
CHIN 601 GW The Poetic Tradition - GWAR
CHIN 602 The Narrative Tradition in English
CHIN 611 The Revolutionary Tradition in Modern Chinese Literature
CHIN 612 GW Negotiating Chineseness in the Late 20th and 21st Centuries - GWAR
HUM 530 Chinese Civilization
Lower division elective in Chinese or related area (upon advising) 3
Upper division electives in Chinese or related area (upon advising) 9
GWAR (if not taken from GWAR courses listed above) (3)
Total Units 30 - 33

 

Note: A minimum of 40 upper division units must be completed for the degree (including upper division units required for the major, general education, electives, etc.). A student can complete this major yet not attain the necessary number of upper division units required for graduation. In this case additional upper division courses will be needed to reach the required total.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Chinese: Concentration in Flagship Chinese Language

See Chinese Bachelor of Arts introduction above

The Concentration in Flagship Chinese Language, in line with federally-funded Chinese Flagship guidelines nationwide, consists of 35 units of lower and upper division language training, many of which are specifically tailored to students in the Flagship program, plus 9 units of coursework in linguistics, culture, classical language, and GWAR. Unique to the Flagship Concentration is a 3 unit content course taught in Chinese by a Chinese-proficient specialist in another subject area. Flagship students must also complete 12 units of Flagship-specific Study Abroad arranged through the Flagship Office, which will include coursework and internship components.

Note: The Concentration in Flagship Chinese Language is open only to students who have been admitted into the Chinese Flagship Program at SF State. Contact the Flagship Office in HUM 573 for information.

 

Program

Course Title Units
CHIN 101 First Semester Chinese
[High school prerequisite*]
5
CHIN 102 Second Semester Chinese
[High school prerequisite*]
5
CHIN 103 Third Semester Chinese 5
CHIN 303 Intermediate Chinese 5
CHIN 311 Conversation and Reading 3
CHIN 312 Speech and Writing 3
CHIN 401 Advanced Chinese 3
CHIN 475
   or
CHIN 476
Flagship Chinese (I)
 
Flagship Chinese (II)
3
F L 325 Linguistics for Foreign Languages 3
CHIN 501 Introduction to Classical Chinese 3
Flagship content course
(pre-existing university course taught in Chinese by Chinese-proficient faculty in any department)
3
GWAR 3
Total Units 44

 

Minor in Chinese Language

This minor is aimed at beginning level learners with little or no background in Chinese Language.

Note: Native speakers of Chinese and international students who have completed secondary and/or tertiary education in Chinese language in a Chinese-speaking country are discouraged from choosing this minor.

 

On-line course descriptions are available.

 

Program

Course Title Units
CHIN 101 First Semester Chinese
[High school prerequisite*]
5
CHIN 102 Second Semester Chinese 5
CHIN 103 Third Semester Chinese 5
CHIN 303 Intermediate Chinese 5
CHIN 311 Conversation and Reading or CHIN 312 Speech and Writing 3
Total Units 23

 

Minor in Chinese Literature and Linguistics

This minor is aimed at native and near-native speakers of Chinese language, and consists of 18 units of required coursework in advanced language, linguistics, oratory, literature and culture, plus an additional 6 units of upper division electives in Chinese or a related subject.

 

On-line course descriptions are available.

 

Program

Course Title Units
CHIN 401 Advanced Chinese 3
F L 325 Linguistics for Foreign Languages 3
CHIN 501 Introduction to Classical Chinese 3
CHIN 507 Traditional Chinese Culture 3
CHIN 530 Oratory and Performance 3
One of the following courses 3
CHIN 600 Topics in Chinese Language, Literature, and Culture in English  
CHIN 601 GW The Poetic Tradition - GWAR
CHIN 602 The Narrative Tradition in English
CHIN 611 The Revolutionary Tradition in Modern Chinese Literature
CHIN 612 GW Negotiating Chineseness in the Late 20th and 21st Centuries - GWAR
HUM 530 Chinese Civilization
Upper division electives in Chinese or related area (upon advising) 6
Total Units 24

 

NOTE: REGARDING STUDY ABROAD
(applies to all Chinese degrees, concentrations and minors): Students are encouraged to study abroad through the International Programs of the California State University and the Bilateral Programs of San Francisco State University. For students opting to study abroad, all study abroad units will count as units in residence and can be used for graduation credit, but no more than half of the units required for the major or minor may be taken outside of the home campus. Flagship Language Concentration students, however, may apply all of their Study Abroad units towards the major.

 

Master of Arts in Chinese

Admission to the Program

A prerequisite for admission to the M.A. program is a B.A. in Chinese (or equivalent), with a Grade Point Average of at least 3.0. Applicants are thus expected to demonstrate advanced proficiency in spoken Mandarin Chinese and Standard Written Chinese, familiarity with major literary/cultural figures and texts, training in the fundamentals of linguistics, and a basic reading proficiency in classical Chinese. San Francisco State University also requires that all students admitted to graduate standing demonstrate proficiency in written English. Applicants who are lacking in one or more of these areas may be admitted conditionally after developing, through consultation with advisors, a program of studies to establish equivalency. Courses prescribed for equivalency may not be credited toward the M.A. degree. In order to assess whether applicants meet acceptable standards and have fulfilled prerequisites, both the Division of Graduate Studies and the Chinese Program are involved in the application review process. Application materials required by the Division of Graduate Studies are described elsewhere in this Bulletin (for details, see Graduate Studies). In addition, the Chinese Program also requires the following supplementary documents: (1) a 500-word analytical statement of purpose in English; (2) a statement in Chinese covering the same or similar content; and (3) three letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic and/or professional qualifications. These supplementary materials should be sent directly to the Chinese Program.

 

On-line course descriptions are available.

 

Program

Course Title Units
CHIN 821 Modern Chinese Literature 3
CHIN 822 Classical Chinese Literature 3
CHIN 824
 
    or
CHIN 825
Testing & Assessment in Teaching/
Learning Chinese as a Second Lauguage

 
Applied Linguistics and Teaching Chinese
3
CHIN 826
    or
CHIN 827
Semantics and Morphology
 
Language Change and Dialectic Variation
3

Exclusively graduate (not paired) elective course in Chinese. 3 units.

Exclusively graduate (not paired) elective course in Chinese, or paired upper division/graduate course in Chinese (students must enroll using the graduate course number) 3 units.

Upper division/graduate electives in Chinese or related subjects with approval of graduate advisor. 9 units

Graduate course in research or teaching methods on advisement. 3 units.

 

Minimum total: 30

and
Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations in two subfields

 

The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.

 

Foreign Languages and Literatures—French

College of Liberal & Creative Arts

Dean: Paul Sherwin

 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HUM 475
Phone: 415-338-1421
Web Site: www.sfsu.edu/~french

Chair: Paola Cortes-Rocca
Program Coordinator: Bérénice Le Marchand
Undergraduate Advisors: Marie-Paule Laden, Delphine Perret, unless otherwise specified
Graduate Advisor: Bérénice Le Marchand

 

Faculty

Professor: Perret
Associate Professors: Laden, Le Marchand

 

Programs

B.A. in French

Minor in French

M.A. in French

 


 

Program Scope

The French program offers lower division language courses and upper division language, culture, and literature courses leading to a B.A. in French. Students who have previously studied French should consult with a French advisor for placement at the proper class level. The program offers graduate seminars in literature, culture, and linguistics leading to the M.A. in French, which allows students to teach at the community college level or to continue graduate study for a doctorate. While many of our B.A. and M.A. graduates pursue teaching careers or further study, a good number go on to careers in other fields such as international law or business.

 

Our program emphasizes training in the four language skills—listening, speaking, reading, and writing as the basic groundwork for more advanced study of the language, literature, and culture. The aim is to broaden students' cultural perspectives by introducing them to various aspects of French and Francophone cultures as they are manifested throughout the world. Students who complete a French major should have both the linguistic and cultural preparation to be able to function at a fairly advanced level in a French-speaking society or with French speakers, and have developed a tolerance for forms of expression and ways of life different from their own. It is hoped that this will prepare them both to pursue careers and to participate fully in today's and tomorrow's global cultures.

 

Bachelor of Arts in French

The French major consists of 30 units of upper division coursework. Up to 16 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the major.

 

All upper division courses are conducted in French (except F L 325), and students are expected to use French in their speaking, reading, and writing (except, for writing, in FR 400 GW).Writing in the Major: Students must complete the University’s GWAR requirement by taking FR 400 GW, F L 400 GW or CWL 400 GW On-line course descriptions are available. Unless otherwise indicated all courses are 3 units.

 

Program (required courses)

Course Title Units
F L 325
    or
FR 450
    or
FR 301
Linguistics for Foreign Languages
 
Translating Themes
 
French Phonetics
3
FR 305 French Composition 3
FR 400 GW
    or
FR 410
French Culture - GWAR
 
Contemporary Culture
3
FR 500 Introduction to Literary Texts 3

Electives in the major:
Choose any six courses in French numbered 300 to 699, not taken as a required course. At least three of these courses must be at the 400 level or above. 18 units

Total: 30 units

 

Note: A minimum of 40 upper division units must be completed for the degree (including upper division units required for the major, general education, electives, etc.). A student can complete this major yet not attain the necessary number of upper division units required for graduation. In this case additional upper division courses will be needed to reach the required total.

 

Minor in French

The French minor consists of 21 units of upper division coursework. Up to 16 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required before taking upper division courses.

 

All upper division courses are conducted in French (except F L 325), and students are expected to use French in their speaking, reading, and writing (except, for writing, in FR 400 GW).

 

Program

Course Title Units
F L 325
    or
FR 450
    or
FR 301
Linguistics for Foreign Languages
 
Translating Themes
 
French Phonetics
3
FR 305 French Composition 3
FR 400 GW
    or
FR 410
French Culture - GWAR
 
Contemporary Culture
3
FR 500 Introduction to Literary Texts 3

Electives for the minor:
Three French upper division courses, 300 level or above, 9 units

Minimum total: 21 units

 

Master of Arts in French

Program Scope

The M.A. Program in French is primarily focused on the study of literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Our main objective is to offer interesting and challenging courses, based on original research and the field of specialization of the French faculty, in order to inspire and teach students to do graduate work while developing their knowledge of French and Francophone literature and culture. All graduate courses in the French Program are conducted in French and students are expected to use French in all their work, including in their Master’s thesis. We offer a variety of courses on periods, genres and themes. Courses are rotated and renewed over a period of two to three years in order to cover most areas and periods of French and Francophone literature. Students are required to take courses covering 5 different centuries from the Middle Ages to the 20th century among the 7 periods / areas offered. Courses available are listed in alphabetical order in the Bulletin (consult Index for page reference). Short descriptions of the specific courses offered for the academic year can be found on the French web site.

 

Admission to Program

Applicants must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. They must demonstrate the proficiency level in French and the knowledge on language, culture and literature expected at the conclusion of a baccalaureate major in French. Consideration will also be given to students with advanced French competency who have obtained a B.A. in another field. They may be admitted as conditionally classified graduate students and are required to remediate or complete all deficiencies before attaining classified status. In order to be accepted by the Program, applicants need to send directly to the French Graduate Advisor (see Faculty page) an analytical statement of purpose of approximately 500 words written in English, and another one in French covering the same content, a sample of written work in French (such as a literary dissertation), two letters of recommendation, and make an appointment for an oral interview in French (in person or by phone).

 

Please note that the only upper division courses accepted for the graduate program are the elective courses (for which graduate students are the courses (for which graduate students are also expected to complete additional work) recommended and accepted by the graduate advisor. The following courses are not accepted : FR 304, 305, 306.

 

Written English Proficiency Requirements

All graduate students at SF State must complete Level One and Level Two English writing requirements.

Level One: Submission of a Statement of Purpose in the application for admission to the French M.A. The statement is to be written in English (500 words) and include the same or similar statement written in French.
Level Two: Level Two may be met in one for two ways:

  • Option I: Submit either a 15 - 20 page essay written in English for a graduate class (program other than the French Program), or an English translation of a 15 - 20 page essay written in French for a graduate class in the French Progam, unless the French instructor of that class accepts to receive an essay written in English.
  • Option II: Submission of a 15 page summary of the M.A. thesis written in English. This summary will be submitted for evaluation to the French faculty.

Students are advised to consult with their graduate advisor early in the program on how best to prepare for the Level Two writing requirement.

 

Program

Graduate courses in French. 15 units.

Upper division/graduate courses in French language, literature, or civilization. 6 units.

 

One of the following options:

Option I

Upper division/graduate courses in French or in related subjects, with approval of graduate advisor. 9 units

 

and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations

 

Option II

Upper division/graduate courses in French or in related subjects, with approval of graduate advisor. 6 units.

 

Course Title Units
F R 898 Master's Thesis 3

and Master's Comprehensive Oral Examination

Minimum total: 30

 

Written and Oral Examinations Option. Students are admitted to oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.

 

Master's Thesis Option. Students must pass an oral examination at the end of the semester preceding the semester when they write their thesis.

 

Foreign Languages and Literatures—German

College of Liberal & Creative Arts

Dean: Paul Sherwin

 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HUM 475
Phone: 415-338-1421
Website: www.sfsu.edu/~german

Chair: Paola Cortes-Rocca

Undergraduate Advisors: Volker Langbehn (A - L), Ilona Vandergriff (M - Z)
Program Coordinator: Volker Langbehn
Graduate Advisor: Ilona Vandergriff

 

Faculty

Professors: Vandergriff, Langbehn

 

Programs

B.A. in German

Minor in German

M.A. in German

 


 

Program Scope

The German Program at San Francisco State University offers a comprehensive and carefully designed program for undergraduate and graduate studies in the area of language, literature, culture, and linguistics.

 

The program addresses the needs of students at all levels, from those without prior knowledge of German to those with advanced, near-native or native competency in German. The curriculum is designed to enable students to develop language proficiency in accordance with the nationally recognized ACTFL standards. Learning German will open up new cultural perspectives and allow students to communicate with 120 million people in the German-speaking countries.

 

The program serves students from the entire University. Many of the students enrolled are double majors, who concurrently pursue a degree in disciplines such as International Relations, Humanities, History, Psychology, Creative Writing, Communication Studies, and Music. Students can also opt for a European Studies Minor.

 

In cooperation with the Office of International Programs we encourage students to study abroad. Through the California State University (CSU) International Program, students may study, for example, at the Universität of Tübingen, Universität of Heidelberg or other institutions of higher learning. Such opportunities give students an immersion experience, helping to build and reinforce language skills while earning units towards graduation. The program also facilitates paid summer internships in German-speaking Europe.

 

Bachelor of Arts in German

The academic program leading to a B.A. in German offers a wide range of courses to meet the diverse needs of today's student population. The undergraduate curriculum includes coursework in language, literature, linguistics and culture. In addition, students can select courses in translation and German for business. To ensure that all students develop advanced language competency, the German Program places great importance on small-sized participatory classes, which maximize opportunities to communicate in German.

 

Innovative teaching methods, films, multimedia and online materials enhance classroom interaction and enrich the academic experience. In addition, excellent computer facilities and a Foreign Language Multimedia Lab provide support for our academic program.

 

The German major consists of 30 units of upper division coursework. Up to 16 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the major.

 

Writing in the Major: Students must complete the University's GWAR requirement by taking F L 400 GW or CWL 400 GW

 

On-line course descriptions are available.

 

Program

Course Title Units
GER 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
GER 325 Applied German Linguistics: Phonetics and Phonology 3
GER 401 German Culture and Civilization 3
GER 510 German Literature I 3
GER 511 German Literature II 3

Upper division electives on advisement: 15 units

Total: 30 units

 

Note: A minimum of 40 upper division units must be completed for the degree (including upper division units required for the major, general education, electives, etc.). A student can complete this major yet not attain the necessary number of upper division units required for graduation. In this case additional upper division courses will be needed to reach the required total.

 

Minor in German

The minor consists of 30 units of upper division coursework. Up to 16 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the major.

 

Program

Course Title Units
Choose two courses from the following: 6
GER 301 German in Review
GER 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition
GER 335 German Through Cinema
GER 341 Intensive Language Practice and Analysis
Choose one course from the following: 3
GER 325 Applied German Linguistics: Phonetics and Phonology
F L 325 Linguistics for Foreign Languages
GER 330 German Language and Society
Choose one course from the following 3
GER 401 German Culture and Civilization
GER 502 Contemporary Germany
HUM 375 Biography of a City: Berlin
Choose one course from the following 6
GER 510 German Literature I
GER 511 German Literature II
GER 556 19 th and 20 th Century German Plays
GER 613 Weimar Literature in English

Electives on advisement: 3 units

Total: 21 units

 

Up to 12 units may be taken through the CSU International Program in Germany. These units must be upper division and must be approved by a German advisor.

 

Master of Arts in German

The graduate program in German offers students a challenging and enriching course of study that encompasses linguistics as well as literary and cultural history from the Middle Ages to the present. Over the course of their graduate studies in German, students acquire a rich interdisciplinary perspective and in-depth knowledge of the literatures of the German-speaking countries along with the critical skills for literary analysis. The program offers many graduate courses in German. As a result, many of our M.A. candidates develop superior language competency.

 

Admission to the Program

It is generally expected that students entering the program will have a B.A. degree or equivalent in German: however consideration will be given to applicants with advanced German language competencies who have a B.A. in another field. These applicants may be admitted as conditionally classified graduate students and will be required to remediate or complete all deficiencies before attaining classified status.

To apply to the program:

  • Applicants must also have a minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Demonstrate advanced proficiency level in German
  • Submit an analytical statement of purpose written in English of approximately 500 words, stating the reasons for applying to the graduate program
  • Submit a sample of analytical writing of 500 words or more written in German
  • Provide one set of transcripts
  • Submit at least two letters of recommendation.

If you have any questions, please contact the program’s graduate advisor to discuss academic preparation for the M.A.

 

Program

Course Title Units
GER 745 Seminar in the Development of the German Language 3

Graduate courses in German. 12 units.

Upper division/graduate courses in German language, literature, or civilization. 6 units

Upper division/graduate courses in German language, literature, or civilization, or in related subjects with approval of graduate advisor. 9 units

 

Minimum total: 30 units

and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations

 

The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than two times.

 

Written English Proficiency. Students have to submit an analytical or argumentative writing of 3,500 words or more written in English, such as a graduate seminar paper. The writing will be evaluated by the German Academic Review Committee using ten criteria in four categories: (1) structure/organization, (2) conclusions grounded in theory and research, (3) knowledge and understanding, and (4) academic discourse which is comprehensive, logical, and consistent.

 

Foreign Languages and Literatures—Italian

College of Liberal & Creative Arts

Dean: Paul Sherwin

 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HUM 475
Phone: 415-338-1421
Web Site: userwww.sfsu.edu/~italian

Chair: Paola Cortes Rocca
Program Coordinator: Christopher Concolino
Undergraduate Advisor: Christopher Concolino
Graduate Advisor: Elisabetta Nelsen

 

Faculty

Professor: Nelsen
Associate Professor: Concolino

 

Programs

B.A. in Italian

Minor in Italian

M.A. in Italian

 


 

Program Scope

The Italian program offers courses in the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and understanding; a broad and comprehensive background in literature, culture, civilization, and Italian studies as well as preparation for a specialized career. Many students study Italian to become language teachers. Many students of music, art, film, archaeology, international relations, history, business, and comparative literature, as well as students planning to become translators and interpreters have discovered the usefulness of Italian. Others take Italian purely for the cultural enrichment they derive from it. The study of Italian is particularly rewarding for those of Italian heritage. It also opens the doors to the CSU International Program Center in Florence, to various Italian art and professional academies, and to Italian universities where students can pursue studies in any field.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Italian

Preparation for the major: The Italian major consists of 30 units of upper division coursework. Up to 16 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the major.

 

Proficiency can be demonstrated by completing the necessary lower-division courses or testing out of them.

 

All upper-division courses are conducted in Italian, and students are expected to use Italian in their speaking, reading, and writing.

 

Writing in the Major: Students must complete the University’s GWAR requirement by taking F L 400 GW, CWL 400 GW or ITAL 600 GW.

 

On-line course descriptions are available. Unless otherwise indicated all courses carry 3 units of credit.

 

Program

Course Title Units
ITAL 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
F L 325 Linguistics for Foreign Languages 3
ITAL 401 Italian Culture and Civilization 3
ITAL 510 Italian Literature—Early Period 3
ITAL 511 Italian Literature—Late Period 3

Upper division electives on advisement: 15 units

Total: 30 units

 

Note: A minimum of 40 upper division units must be completed for the degree (including upper division units required for the major, general education, electives, etc.). A student can complete this major yet not attain the necessary number of upper division units required for graduation. In this case additional upper division courses will be needed to reach the required total.

 

Minor in Italian

Preparation for the minor: The Italian minor consists of 21 units of upper division coursework. Up to 16 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the minor.

 

Program

Course Title Units
ITAL 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
F L 325 Linguistics for Foreign Languages 3
ITAL 401 Italian Culture and Civilization 3
ITAL 510 Italian Literature—Early Period 3
ITAL 511 Italian Literature—Late Period 3

Electives on advisement: 6 units

Total: 21 units

 

Master of Arts in Italian

The Master of Arts in Italian program stresses the study of literature and culture. We emphasize Italianistica (Italian Studies), and individual authors from the Middle Ages to the present. The history of Italian literature is taught through linguistic and thematic development in relation to larger European and extra-European contexts. Close textual analysis that includes the study of stylistics, rhetoric, semantics and syntax are a part of graduate seminars, but courses naturally provide useful background knowledge related to topics in art, history, music and philosophy. The M.A. program requires students to deepen their knowledge of genres and literary periods, which they undertake in courses taught in Italian. This fact enables them to reach superior language competency in spoken and written Italian. Many of our graduates teach in secondary schools and community colleges or continue their studies for the Ph.D.

 

Admission to the Program

Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a B.A. in Italian or its equivalent. Those without this degree may be admitted conditionally and asked to complete additional units in consultation with the graduate advisor.

 

The following documents must be sent to the graduate advisor: 1) two letters of recommendation; 2) an analytical Statement of Purpose in English of approximately 500 words, which should be accompanied by 3) a second version written in Italian; (the two Statements of Purpose are required for admission in order to show proficiency in writing at the graduate level); official proof of the applicant’s score on the GRE (Graduate Record Examination).

 

Program

Graduate Seminars in Italian (with course number 880): 15 units.

Graduate Seminars or Paired Graduate courses in Italian Literature from the following: 6 units.

Course Title
ITAL 800 Italian Literature on Film in English
ITAL 850 The Italian Theatre
ITAL 870 Italian Women Writers
ITAL 881 Divine Comedy

Upper division undergraduate courses; paired courses or graduate courses in Italian or related disciplines with approval of graduate major advisor. 9 units

and Master's Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations*

 

Minimum total: 30 units

A maximum of 6 units may be taken in English.

 

A maximum of 9 units transferred from CSU approved study-abroad programs may count toward the M.A. if taken as upper-division undergraduate units or graduate-level units.

 

* Students are admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may be attempted not more than twice.

 

In order to meet the University’s exit requirement for written English, M.A. students will be asked to enroll in F L 800: Seminar in Academic Writing and Research Methodology before taking their Master’s Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations.

 

Foreign Languages and Literatures—Japanese

 

College of Liberal & Creative Arts

Dean: Paul Sherwin

 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HUM 475
Phone: 415-338-1421
Web Site: userwww.sfsu.edu/~japanese

Chair: Paola Cortes-Rocca
Program Coordinator:  Midori McKeon
Undergraduate Advisors: Makiko Asano (Minor), Masahiko Minami (Major)
Graduate Advisor: Tomoko Takeda

 

Faculty

Professors: McKeon, Minami
Associate Professor: Asano
Assistant Professor: Takeda

 

Programs

B.A. in Japanese

Minor in Japanese

M.A. in Japanese

 


 

Program Scope

The undergraduate Japanese program focuses on developing proficiency in the language in a socio-cultural context by offering a variety of language training courses and by conducting courses in culture and literature in Japanese. In addition to the required course work, students choose electives from a broad range of subjects, which include various courses in literature and culture as well as in translation, interpretation, and business Japanese. The Master of Arts in Japanese offers two emphases: Teaching of Japanese as a Foreign Language and Professional Applications of the Language Study. The curriculum for the teaching emphasis prepares students for a career in teaching Japanese at the community college level. Courses offered include linguistics, pedagogy, and culture. The professional applications emphasis helps students acquire competency in their specific occupational goals in areas such as business, government, communication, arts, and other professional fields.

 

On-line course descriptions are available. Unless otherwise indicated all courses are 3 units.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Japanese

The Japanese major consists of 44 units of lower and upper division coursework. Up to 10 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the major.

 

Upper-division courses in Japanese are generally conducted in Japanese, and students are expected to use Japanese in their speaking, reading, and writing.

 

Writing in the Major: Students must complete the University’s GWAR requirement by taking F L 400 GW, CWL 400 GW, HUM 300 GW, or COMM 562 GW on advisement.

 

Program

Course Title Units
JAPN 103 Third Semester Japanese 5
JAPN 250 Intensive Study of Kanji (Level 1) 3
JAPN 301 Japanese Conversation 3
JAPN 302 Japanese Reading and Grammar 3
JAPN 250 Intensive Study of Kanji (Level 2) 3
JAPN 305
    or
JAPN 306
Advanced Conversation and Composition I
 
Advanced Conversation and Composition II
3
JAPN 309 Advanced Readings in Japanese 3
F L 325 Linguistics for Foreign Languages 3
JAPN 401 Topics in Japanese Culture 3
JAPN 250 Intensive Study of Kanji (Level 3) 3
JAPN 510 Modern Japanese Literature 3

Upper division electives on advisement: 9 units

Total: 44 units

 

Note: A minimum of 40 upper division units must be completed for the degree (including upper division units required for the major, general education, electives, etc.). A student can complete this major yet not attain the necessary number of upper division units required for graduation. In this case additional upper division courses will be needed to reach the required total.

 

Note: In general, it takes three semesters of JAPN 250 Intensive Study of Kanji to reach Level 3 mastery (1,000 characters) Level 3 mastery of Kanji is prerequisite to JAPN 510.

 

Minor in Japanese

The Japanese minor consists of 23 units of lower and upper division coursework. Up to 10 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the minor.

 

Upper-division courses in Japanese are generally conducted in Japanese, and students are expected to use Japanese in their speaking, reading, and writing.

 

Program

Course Title Units
JAPN 103 Third Semester Japanese 5
JAPN 250 Intensive Study of Kanji (Level 1) 3
JAPN 301 Japanese Conversation 3
JAPN 302 Japanese Reading and Grammar 3
JAPN 305
    or
JAPN 306
Advanced Conversation and Composition I
 
Advanced Conversation and Composition II
3
JAPN 309 Advanced Readings in Japanese 3

Upper-division electives on advisement: 3 units

Total: 23 units


Individual student programs will be designed by an academic advisor, according to student's background and need.

 

Master of Arts in Japanese

The Master of Arts in Japanese offers two emphases:

  • Teaching of Japanese as a Foreign Language
  • Professional Applications

 

Admission to the Program

For admission to the master's program in Japanese, non-native speakers of Japanese must have a bachelor's degree in Japanese or in a field related to the area of intended emphasis. Native speakers of Japanese must have a bachelor's degree (no restrictions on the field). Applicants must also have a minimum 3.0 GPA; demonstrate the proficiency level in Japanese expected at the conclusion of a baccalaureate major in Japanese; submit two analytical essays - one in English (500 words), and the other in Japanese covering the same content stating the relevant past experiences and the reasons for applying to the graduate program at SF State; provide one set of transcripts; submit at least two letters of recommendation written in English or Japanese, both of which must be from an individual familiar with the applicant's academic performance; and provide TOEFL scores (for non-native speakers of English only; photocopies acceptable as long as the admissions office receives sealed scores) or sealed scores for the GRE Analytical Writing Test (for native speakers of English).

 

Written English Proficiency Requirements

Level One: Written English proficiency will be evaluated based on the analytical essay (written in English) that is to be submitted as part of the application package.

Level Two: Proficiency is demonstrated by satisfactory completion of a research project, master’s thesis and oral defense, or written and oral comprehensive examinations.

 

Core Courses for Both Emphases:

Select three of the following four courses (If all four courses (JAPN 750, 800, 860, 890) are taken, the fourth one will count as an elective.) 9 units

Course Title
JAPN 750 Seminar in Japanese Linguistics
JAPN 800 Seminar in Analysis of Japanese Cultural Studies
JAPN 860 Seminar: Topics in Japanese Literature
JAPN 890 Integrative Seminar: Japanese Language and Culture

 

Emphasis (units selected from one of the emphases listed below)

Culminating Experience Requirement:

One of the following three options: 3 units

  1. JAPN 895 Applied Research Project and Oral Defense
  2. JAPN 898 Master's Thesis and Oral Defense
  3. Master's Comprehensive Oral and Written Examinations (which will cover 4 fields: Japanese Culture, Linguistics, Literature, and the student’s field of interest, such as Japanese business and education).

Minimum total: 30 units

 

Teaching of Japanese as a Foreign Language Emphasis

Select 12 units (if all five courses (JAPN 760, 765, 770, 775, 780) are taken, the fifth one will count as an elective.) 12 units

Course Title
JAPN 770 Seminar in Teaching Japanese
JAPN 775 Seminar in Materials Development for Teaching Japanese
JAPN 780 Practicum in Teaching Japanese
And one of the following:
JAPN 760 Practicum in Teaching Japanese
JAPN 765 Seminar in Pedagogical Japanese Linguistics

 

Electives selected on advisement: 6 units

Minimum units for emphasis: 18 units

 

Professional Applications Emphasis

Units selected on advisement from the following (at least 9 units must be at the graduate level): 12 units

Course Title
JAPN 350 Introduction to Translation
JAPN 390 Business Japanese
JAPN 395 Advanced Business Japanese: Business Writing
JAPN 401 Edo Culture
JAPN 401 Heian Culture: Culture of Peace
JAPN 401 Japanese Identity
JAPN 401 Japanese Tea Ceremony and Tea Culture
JAPN 401 Japanese Way of Living
JAPN 401 Life and Thought of Medieval Japan
JAPN 401 Modern Cultural History of Japan
JAPN 510 Modern Japanese Literature
JAPN 590 Japanese Women Writers
JAPN 590 Contemporary Japanese Literature
JAPN 690 Introduction to Consecutive Interpretation
JAPN 710 Current Topics: Magazines and Periodicals
JAPN 710 Current Topics: Newspapers
JAPN 710 Current Topics: Radio and Television
JAPN 710 Interpretation Workshop
JAPN 710 Translation Workshop
JAPN 725 Technical Translation
JAPN 730 Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation
JAPN 735 Seminar in Simultaneous Interpretation
JAPN 765 Second Language Acquisition
JAPN 860 Seminar in Modern Japanese Literature
JAPN 860 Hyakunin Isshu: 100 Poems by 100 Poets
JAPN 860 The Tale of Genji and No Plays

Selected courses with approval of graduate advisor

 

Electives selected upon advisement (Japanese courses or courses from other departments): 6 units

Minimum units for emphasis: 18 units

 

Applied Research Project or Thesis. If the master’s degree is not earned within 2 semesters of enrolling in a culminating experience course (JAPN  895 or 898), students must maintain continuous enrollment by taking a “zero unit” course in the College of Extended Learning (CEL 499) until the project or thesis is completed.

 

Comprehensive Examinations. Student are admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. Both examinations may not be attempted more than two times.

 

Foreign Languages and Literatures—Russian

College of Liberal & Creative Arts

Dean: Paul Sherwin

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HUM 475
Phone: 415-338-1421
E-mail: russian@sfsu.edu
Web Site: www.sfsu.edu/~russian

Chair: Mohammad Salama
Undergraduate Advisor: Natalia Tkachov

Faculty

Lecturers: Hanson, Kristal, Tkachov

 

Program

Minor in Russian

 


 

Program Scope

The Russian program offers lower division language courses (Russian 101-103) and courses in advanced language, conversation, composition, culture, and civilization as well as a considerable range of literature—both in Russian and in English translation—comprising a minor that will enhance a wide range of majors in various disciplines. In this post-Soviet era the study of Russian language and culture, and the knowledge of the country as a whole, becomes even more imperative. Students are either frequently visiting Russia or working there for an extended period of time. In addition, there is now a greater availability of Russian archival material to Western students, researchers, and scholars.

 

The minor in Russian consists of 23 units of lower and upper division coursework. Up to 13 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the minor.

 

On-line course descriptions are available.

 

Minor in Russian

Program

Course Title Units
RUSS 103 Third Semester Russian 5
RUSS 260 Russian Culture and Civilization in English 3
RUSS 305 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
RUSS 307 Advanced Reading and Composition 3
RUSS 511 Russian Literature II 3

Electives on advisement (all must be upper division courses): 6 units

Total: 23 units

 

Foreign Languages and Literatures—Spanish

College of Liberal & Creative Arts

Dean: Paul Sherwin

 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HUM 475
Phone: 415-338-1421
Web Site: http://www.sfsu.edu/~spanish/

Chair: Paola Cortes-Rocca
Program Coordinator: Michael Hammer
Undergraduate Advisors: Gustavo Calderón (A - H), Michael Hammer (I - P), Fermin Rodriguez (Q - Z)
Graduate Advisor: Fermin Rodriguez

 

Faculty

Professor: Calderón
Associate Professors: Cortes-Rocca, Hammer, Rodriguez

 

Programs

B.A. in Spanish

Minor in Spanish

M.A. in Spanish

 


 

Program Scope

The Spanish program offers a Bachelor of Arts, a minor, and a Master of Arts in Spanish. At the undergraduate level, the classes in linguistics, culture, and civilization are aimed at improving one’s understanding of the language and the people who speak it.

 

An ever increasing Spanish-speaking population has made Spanish the second most spoken language in the state of California and in other states of the Union. The study and knowledge of this language, therefore, offers career alternatives in practically all fields of work and is definitely an asset when seeking employment.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

Preparation for the major:

The Spanish major consists of 30 units of upper division coursework. Up to 16 units of prerequisite coursework or demonstrated language proficiency is required to begin the major.

 

Proficiency can be demonstrated by completing the necessary lower-division courses, testing out of them, or by taking the placement test. All upper division courses are conducted in Spanish, and students are expected to use Spanish in their speaking, reading, and writing.

 

It is also recommended that students complete SPAN 301 (Advanced Grammar and Composition) prior to taking upper division courses in language and literature.

 

Writing in the Major: Students must complete the University’s GWAR requirement by taking SPAN 401 GW, F L 400 GW, or CWL 400 GW.

 

On-line course descriptions are available. Unless otherwise indicated all courses are 3 units.

 

Program

Course Title Units
F L 325
    or
SPAN 326
Linguistics for Foreign Languages
 
Applied Spanish Linguistics: Morphology and Syntax
3
SPAN 341 Introduction to the Reading of Literary Texts 3
SPAN 401 GW
    or
SPAN 405
Culture and Civilization of Spain - GWAR
 
Culture and Civilization of Spanish America
3
SPAN 595 Senior Survey in Spanish or Spanish American Literature
(taken once during senior year)
3

 

Electives in the major:

Choose any six courses in Spanish numbered 300 to 699. At least three of these courses must be at the 400 level or above. 18 units

Total: 30 units

 

Note: A minimum of 40 upper division units must be completed for the degree (including upper division units required for the major, general education, electives, etc.). A student can complete this major yet not attain the necessary number of upper division units required for graduation. In this case additional upper division courses will be needed to reach the required total.

 

Minor in Spanish

Program

Course Title Units
F L 325
    or
SPAN 326
Linguistics for Foreign Languages
 
Applied Spanish Linguistics: Morphology and Syntax
3
SPAN 341 Introduction to the Reading of Literary Texts 3
SPAN 401 GW
    or
SPAN 405
Culture and Civilization of Spain - GWAR
 
Culture and Civilization of Spanish America
3

 

Electives:

Choose four Spanish courses, three of which must be at the upper division level (300 or above). 12 units

Total: 21 units

 

Master of Arts in Spanish

The M.A. program in Spanish is mostly focused on Spanish and Latin American literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the present. Over the course of their graduate studies in Spanish, students acquire a solid grounding in major works of poetry, prose, and theater, as well as the tools necessary to approach these works critically. All courses in the Spanish program are taught in Spanish. For more information, please see the graduate program website at: http://www.sfsu.edu/~spanish/grads.html.

 

Admission to the Program

In addition to the requirements established by the University and the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, a student must also meet the following admission requirements established by the Spanish M.A. Program.

  1. All applicants are expected to have the equivalent of a B.A. in Spanish, that is, 30 units of upper division work in Spanish, with a GPA of 3.0 or better. If the student has not met this requirement, he or she may, at the discretion of the Program, be admitted as a “conditionally classified” graduate student. Students thus admitted must satisfactorily complete a number of specified courses before they become fully classified. These courses are not included in the 30 units required for the Masters.
  2. Applicants must arrange for two letters of recommendation to be sent to the program.
  3. Applicants must demonstrate to the Spanish faculty a record of prior scholastic achievement indicative of potential success as a graduate student. This means that applicants must submit a brief writing sample (essay) in Spanish or English which shows the scope of the applicant’s critical preparation and analytical ability. Ideally this will be a paper written in an undergraduate class, from 1,000 to 1,200 words in length.
  4. Applicants must also submit two copies of a brief statement of purpose (500 words), one written in English, the other in Spanish.
  5. Applicants are responsible for meeting the appropriate deadlines. Materials sent directly to the Spanish Program must be postmarked by April 1 to be considered for fall admission, or by October 1, to be considered for spring admission.

 

Program

Graduate courses in Spanish (700-800 level) for a total of 15 units.

Upper division/graduate courses (500-899) 6 units.

At least 8 courses (24 units) must be taken within the program, and up to 6 units from a related field may be counted for the degree. Any courses taken outside the Spanish Program must have prior approval of the Graduate Advisor. 9 units.

 

Minimum total: 30 units

 

Written English Proficiency. Since the Master’s Comprehensive Written and Oral Examinations are in Spanish, students must fulfill the Level-Two English requirement by passing F L 800 with a B or higher. Students who do not receive at least a B must retake the course.

 

Examinations. The semester before a candidate plans to take the Spanish comprehensive written and oral examinations, he or she should contact the graduate advisor in order to arrange for a screening interview. By the time of the screening interview, the student should have read all of the books on the reading list. The screening committee assesses the candidate's preparation and advise him or her on any areas of study that need more attention before the examinations. Candidates will NOT be screened until they have satisfied the English proficiency requirement.

 

The student is admitted to the oral examination upon passing the written examination. The exam consists of 5 questions on Spanish and Latin American literary topics. The grading scale ranges from 0-5 points. Students must receive a minimum of 2 points on each question and must receive at least 15 total points to pass the exam. Both examinations may be attempted a maximum of two times. For more information, please see the program website at www.sfsu.edu/~spanish/exampolicy.html.

 

 

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